Xtratime Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do you guys find it a worrying trend that players seem to be starting younger and younger?

The likes of Martins, Torres, Rooney, C.Ronaldo and Fabregas are getting games at such early age. Later they would suffer from burnout, lose their form for around a season or two, and then faces a huge hurdle to recapture their past glory, like Ronaldo.

The game has got so far, and the stakes for success have gotten so huge that its difficult to distinguish whether sth is done for the good of the game, for the love of the game or for the simple motive of success and money.

For instance, clubs are already poaching players at ridiculous ages, 13-16 years old. All for the reason of helping the player develop his ability for a great career ahead. How would a 14 year old deal with all the atention, hype, pressure, expectations? And when the parents/family tried to step in and provide a guiding hand, the players then in typical generation X fashion rebel and challenge them, like Anna Kournikova in tennis for example.

I've jsut watched the 1970 WC final and was wondering are there still time for modern football to retain the old values of football - pure passion and art. Seeing Ronaldinho playing with a smile settles me down a bit, although after looking at the latest Maradona pictures has tainted that feeling a bit.

What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,152 Posts
For me the real worry is the money and attention. I think alot of talents are being wasted because they have too much money at too young a age and some lose the hunger and the fight to be the best.

Also lack of games isn't good and if you look at alot of the greats of the game they played games in their teens. Maybe Maradona or Pele wouldn't be the same players if they were in the youth teams of Real Madrid or Barca since they were 14 and getting paid quite abit. Obviously I don't mean 60 games a season but its important to get games especially if you are extremely gifted.

The playing part of it isn't the worrying thing(Its not exactly going to war), But the exposures of the modern game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,477 Posts
karrmadamaii said:
Do you guys find it a worrying trend that players seem to be starting younger and younger?

The likes of Martins, Torres, Rooney, C.Ronaldo and Fabregas are getting games at such early age. Later they would suffer from burnout, lose their form for around a season or two, and then faces a huge hurdle to recapture their past glory, like Ronaldo.
Had you followed football for more than two years ou would know that this is not a difference from the past. Maldini debuted at 16, Van Basten at 16/17 and they where first teamers one year later. I can give some examples for most years at least 20 years back in time. Wether a talented young player makes a debute is up to them and the structure of the clubthey play in. In countries that they export a lot of players the players bebute much earlier in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,902 Posts
In the late 20s/early 30s Herbert Chapman travelled to the middle of nowhere in England to sign a young Ted Drake to play for Arsenal. He wasn't much older than seventeen when he made his debut for us. Nothing new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
JKris said:
Had you followed football for more than two years ou would know that this is not a difference from the past. Maldini debuted at 16, Van Basten at 16/17 and they where first teamers one year later. I can give some examples for most years at least 20 years back in time. Wether a talented young player makes a debute is up to them and the structure of the clubthey play in. In countries that they export a lot of players the players bebute much earlier in general.
My point is, the young players entering the hustle and bustle of first-team, top-flight football as key squad players, or stars are much2 more. Given the more exposed nature of publicity today, and the insane levels of payment available, plus the great competition of success makes getting the next Ronaldinho at the youngest age possible has become a "sport" participated by the big clubs.

I've thought abt Maldini as I wrote the thread, but that wasn't my point. There would be nothing wrong for kids to come out at a young age, however the frequency of this happening has risen nowadays, esp the the case where the kids are being labelled as the "Next Somebody" or "Future Great".

How much were the these young players paid back then, and even if by comparison of scale, the payments are not much different than nowadays, the current publicity generated has a greater effect and impact on that young players lives.

Question - Would a young Freddy Adu get such attention as he would nowadays back then?

You're 13 years old and all of a sudden, you're the next Ronaldo. It certainly doesn't help that many kids' dreams are playing footie, and the attention alone would bring a negative impact, plus the handling of that attention by a 13 year-old wouldn't be the same as one of 25 year old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
If the people who are responsible for the players don't have a problem with it, who are we to say they are too young? They must be doing something right, if they can get in the team at such a young age.

In my opinion, they should be given a chance. How can they get experience, if they don't get a chance? Sometimes, you have to take risks, if you want to be successful. Good luck to them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
The big concern has always been that too much pressure is put on really young players who aren't developed mentally and physically and they suffer burn-out. It happened in the past and it will happen in the future. How many prodigies will stay in the spotlight and have a good, long career? The main difference I notice today is that football is such a big thing that any child who can bounce the ball in the air a few times gets his face on tv and in the papers and becomes the next big thing, with an agent and those corrupt sportswear companies sniffing around. It's almost child abuse and it's ridiculous - because every schoolyard in every country in the whole word has a playground maestro who can do a few tricks. But then, it's probably our own fault for being impressed by affectations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
Roy Race said:
The big concern has always been that too much pressure is put on really young players who aren't developed mentally and physically and they suffer burn-out. It happened in the past and it will happen in the future. How many prodigies will stay in the spotlight and have a good, long career? The main difference I notice today is that football is such a big thing that any child who can bounce the ball in the air a few times gets his face on tv and in the papers and becomes the next big thing, with an agent and those corrupt sportswear companies sniffing around. It's almost child abuse and it's ridiculous - because every schoolyard in every country in the whole word has a playground maestro who can do a few tricks. But then, it's probably our own fault for being impressed by affectations.
Yes, that's a BIG problem. Children are expected to perform at the highest level, when they aren't properly developed.

They should be given the opportunity to enjoy their childhood and once they're ready, they should be given the opportunity to prove themselves.

People need to make sure the young players are properly taken care of, that they aren't rushed into playing regularly and that people don't expect too much of them, at such a young age.. These players need to be given the best start possible, for them to be successful for a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ahsan said:
These players need to be given the best start possible, for them to be successful for a long time.
Sometimes, the best of starts is not the biggest of starts.

Only 15 years ago, we have seen a lot of players playing well into their 30s and retiring around 35-36 in the top flight, playing in big teams. Nowadays its quite rare to find such players, except only in the lower leagues.

Besides that, if the young players excell for 3 years, gets injured, and gets back on the long road for recovery, how long would the club be patient and wait for the player to return to his old self? With other younger players coming up, I think the decision's pretty clear. After that we'll have one more 26 year-old who's past his best.

Imagine that, a 26-year old has been.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
a lot of young player want to move to early in big club!
They have to learn in "familial" club , and after when they're strong enough move to a big club!
Zidane don't become "Zizou" before age of 24, and ronaldinho 23!
A lot of player are too stupid too understand that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
karrmadamaii said:
Sometimes, the best of starts is not the biggest of starts.

Only 15 years ago, we have seen a lot of players playing well into their 30s and retiring around 35-36 in the top flight, playing in big teams. Nowadays its quite rare to find such players, except only in the lower leagues.

Besides that, if the young players excell for 3 years, gets injured, and gets back on the long road for recovery, how long would the club be patient and wait for the player to return to his old self? With other younger players coming up, I think the decision's pretty clear. After that we'll have one more 26 year-old who's past his best.

Imagine that, a 26-year old has been.
First of all, you're right about the way a player starts his career. It's not necessarily best for the player to start at a big club, but I never mentioned anything about where it would be best for a player to start his career.

About the point you made concerning injuries, I never mentioned that either. I was just saying that if a player is to have a long and successful career, it is important that he is taught how to take care of himself, how to handle himself and conduct himself properly..

If a player gets injured, it is up to the club to decide whether or not they want to wait for the player to recover. There will obviously be young players waiting for a chance, but there is no guarantee that they will get it.

The club may buy a more experienced player, instead of taking a risk on a young player. This is a different debate. Let's just concentrate on the original topic of the thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,223 Posts
IN the 60s and 70s loads of players were REGULARS at 16 and 17. Look at George Best and Glyn Pardoe. Pardoe played for us at the age of 15 and became a regular pretty much straight away!

~ The Green ;)ne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,570 Posts
Players even in the past started out very young. Rivera started playing in Serie A at 16 years of age. I think that what we "could" worry about is the money involved and the pressure some kids are put through given that a lot of money is won by winning the competitions etc. I think that, the question is also blown out of proportions, as in I do not see a real threat but a possible one. Its diff. if you know what I mean. :)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top