Xtratime Community banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In an interview in Worldsoccer Scolari goes on about how if it´s necessary to "play ugly" to win the world cup, his Brazil team will do so. As an example, he cites the teams of 1982 and 1994 and seems to be implying that the team of 1982 is largely forgotten but the team of 1994 has become immortal - because that team won the world cup.

But is that really so?

First of all, the team of 1994 wasn´t that ugly - not compared to various teams Scolari has welded together. But it was certainly nowhere nearly as beautiful as the team of 1982 - we all agree about that, I hope.

But has the team of 1994 really become immortal in Brazil while the team of 1982 has been forgotten?

How say you, Brazilians?

For us in Europe, I think I can safely say that while we respect the team of 1994 as a very strong football team we hardly remember anything that team actually did on the field - with the exception of a few tricks by that certainly immortal striker Romario. Branco´s goal against the Netherlands and (sadly) poor Leonardo´s red card against USA.

(What a fine footballer he was! Has he really quit? I always thought Luxemburgo´s greatest mistake was not immediately after France 1998 starting to build a new team around Leonardo in midfield. This would have given him authority and Brazil a much-needed stability. Any comments?)

On the other hand, those of us that were already around in 1982 remember almost the whole games from Spain in vivid detail. And the games of the team of 1986 also, by the way. In some ways that team was ever better or more pleasant to watch.

The mantra of both coaches and journalists is that nobody remembers quality, only results. I think that´s bull****. The moment I remember best from WC 1998 is that immortal moment when the Paraguyan jumped over the legs of two defenders with the ball stuck between his feet. Glorious! But I don´t remember the results of that game - and couldn´t care less.

Really, isn´t it time fans of real football started to protest this mantra about the result being the only thing that counts?

I love Brazil but I would much prefer them to exit early playing beautiful football and creating unforgettable moments for us spectators that winning the world cup by playing "ugly".

But perhaps the Brazilians themselves covet victory so much that they don´t care how it is accomplished. Eh?
 

·
Canonized
Joined
·
37,734 Posts
Honestly, brazilians remember both teams. But proabbly teh 94 team is remembered more because it is more recent. Anybody that is 24 years old today never saw the 82 team play. I was 6 in the time, and my memory is better than an average person, i can say that i remember only a few thing sof the 82 team (i have never watched any game of that WC ever since!).

I prefer to win beautiful, than to lose playing extraodinary. You don't necessary have to play "ugly" to win. That is bulllocks! Ask the Italians that!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Never watched a game of the 1982 team? My dear boy, I envy you. Because you have something to look forward to in life!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,458 Posts
Brazil coach Scolari warns players against violence

RIO DE JANEIRO (May 8, 2002 02:27 PM EDT) - Brazil coach Luiz Felipe Scolari has warned his players to curb their physical approach at this summer's World Cup finals in Korea and Japan.

The four-time world champions, who only just sneaked into an event they never have missed, were accused through the qualifying stages of roughhouse tactics.

The physical style of AS Roma's Emerson, in particular, has come under the microscope for his continual fouls which often border on violence.

Several Brazilian referees have predicted soccer's showcase event will be marked by on-pitch violence, but Scolari told television station GloboNews Wednesday: "I think, on the contrary, that World Cup referees will stamp down on violence right from the start.

"Players know football is a physical, contact sport, however, and in Europe tough tackles are not always considered a foul. My players will just have to be careful."

Many soccer fans find the attractive, silky skills of Brazil's 1970 world-championship-winning midfield at the other end of the spectrum from the tough-tackling style of its contempoary counterparts.

Brazil's tough, 1994 World Cup-winning captain, Dunga, who had continual criticism for his physical style, was a forerunner of the current trend of midfielders who destroy rather than create
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top