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I was shopping yesterday, and the store had music on the speakers. I wasn't really listening, but suddenly I heard, loud and clear, these lyrics:

"It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you.
There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do."

I started to cry right there in the store... for my adopted national team.

In the past few days, I have been asked by my friends and my e-friends and also by not-so-friendly people, why I support Argentina. More importantly, I have been asked if I will stop supporting them now.

I first was introduced to La Seleccion sometime during 1991 or maybe early 1992 (it was so long ago I can't remember). I was flipping through the television stations with my remote control, not particularly looking for anything, but suddenly there was a soccer game on one of the Spanish stations. I had never seen a soccer game before. Certainly never a professional international match. One of the teams playing was Argentina. I watched the whole match, which I found out later had been a tape rerun of the 1991 Copa America final. Since it was in Spanish, and I knew zero Spanish, I didn't know at the time what it was. When the game was over, I turned it off and went about my daily business. But I couldn't get that blue and white team out of my mind.

Within a few days I went to a local book store and looked for soccer books, of which they had about three. I bought one that had a few out-of-date paragraphs about the Argentina national team. But on the way out, there was a magazine, in Spanish, with a picture of a soccer player on it. It was El Grafico. I took it home, but of course couldn't read a word of it. The magazine sat around my house for a few more weeks, and still I couldn't get that blue and white team out of my mind. There was only one thing I could do, and I had to do it: Teach myself to read Spanish. So I got a dictionary and started translating word by word the articles in the El Grafico magazine. It was slow going and very frustrating. But I kept at it because for some reason I just had to know more about that team. I wasn't really even sure where Argentina was. I knew it was in South America, but knew virtually nothing about it.

I found out that one of their best players was Gabriel Batistuta. I gradually found bits and pieces of information, translated it, and learned more about him and the national team. From afar I followed as best I could their qualifying for the 1994 World Cup.

Those of you who live in real soccer countries cannot understand what it is like in the USA especially before the 1994 World Cup. Nobody knew, nobody cared. I felt very alone and felt as if I was watching through a blurry telescope at something happening in another universe.

To make a long story shorter, I followed the NT through the 1994 World Cup and their unfortunate ending, then through the turbulence of the Passarella era, Bati's problems, Redondo's problems, the rise of the young group of players from the 1996 Olympics. All of this without the internet. I was still alone with my adopted team.

Then late in 1997 I got a computer at home with an internet connection and I found that there actually were other people out there who were interested in Argentina. I was not alone after all. It was like discovering life on another planet. That made such a huge difference for me. By then, I was pretty good at reading Spanish and through the internet I was able to access all of the main Argentina newspapers and even get information in English! That must sound very stupid and quaint to some of you, but it was a true revelation for me. A miracle of miracles.

The 1998 World Cup also ended in disappointment for Argentina and I felt very bad for the players, but I was so happy that Passarella was finally gone, taking with him his persecution of Batistuta.

The years from 1998 to 2002 were so much fun for me. Following players that I had struggled so hard to get to know through my previous translating efforts. The qualifying rounds were great, one match a month! That was heaven to be able to follow the scores on the internet and then hopefully Telemundo or Univision would run a tape. The team was almost the same as 1998 but with such an attitude difference. These players all were working together for the same goal. I don't know where anyone would get the idea that any of these players were arrogant or selfish or overconfident. They were not.

Four years I spent with these players. And now it's over. I cannot imagine the grief these men are feeling today. All that hope...gone.

I have learned so much from the Argentina team. I have found out alot about the country, the people, the continent of South America. I can even find Paraguay on a map, which most Americans cannot do, I'm sure. It has been worth every minute of time I spent and every bit of effort.

I still have my first copy of El Grafico. The player on the cover was Maradona. At the time I bought the magazine, I didn't know who he was. But I do now. And I can read it cover to cover without the help of a dictionary.


So sorry I bored you all with this.

But I have to say this one last thing to the Argentina national team:

"It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you. There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do."
 

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Wow, what a great post Humbird:)
Its the same story for me but I didnt learn how to read and write in Spanish:D I mean I also follow up the Arg NT when I was 12 years old back in 1991 during the Copa America, since that day I didnt miss single Arg match broadcasted in our country, I even follow up every team in Europe which have Arg player.
One day I promised myself to watch the Arg NT playing in front of my eyes, and Batistuta the most. That dream came true but the bad luck is after me whatever:D (maybe I am the one who prevent the Arg NT of winning any major trophy) because days before the match I was going to watch Bati got injured:(
I still hope of watching Bati player in front of me, and I am sure that I will make it come true... and the most important thing is visting Argentina and I will try my best to go there.
 

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Does any body has a word about this charming, facinating, bewitching, spellbinding and unbelievable post.

Humbird, you are the voice of Argentina fans.
Well done my queen.

:)

Humbird said:
I was shopping yesterday, and the store had music on the speakers. I wasn't really listening, but suddenly I heard, loud and clear, these lyrics:

"It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you.
There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do."

I started to cry right there in the store... for my adopted national team.

In the past few days, I have been asked by my friends and my e-friends and also by not-so-friendly people, why I support Argentina. More importantly, I have been asked if I will stop supporting them now.

I first was introduced to La Seleccion sometime during 1991 or maybe early 1992 (it was so long ago I can't remember). I was flipping through the television stations with my remote control, not particularly looking for anything, but suddenly there was a soccer game on one of the Spanish stations. I had never seen a soccer game before. Certainly never a professional international match. One of the teams playing was Argentina. I watched the whole match, which I found out later had been a tape rerun of the 1991 Copa America final. Since it was in Spanish, and I knew zero Spanish, I didn't know at the time what it was. When the game was over, I turned it off and went about my daily business. But I couldn't get that blue and white team out of my mind.

Within a few days I went to a local book store and looked for soccer books, of which they had about three. I bought one that had a few out-of-date paragraphs about the Argentina national team. But on the way out, there was a magazine, in Spanish, with a picture of a soccer player on it. It was El Grafico. I took it home, but of course couldn't read a word of it. The magazine sat around my house for a few more weeks, and still I couldn't get that blue and white team out of my mind. There was only one thing I could do, and I had to do it: Teach myself to read Spanish. So I got a dictionary and started translating word by word the articles in the El Grafico magazine. It was slow going and very frustrating. But I kept at it because for some reason I just had to know more about that team. I wasn't really even sure where Argentina was. I knew it was in South America, but knew virtually nothing about it.

I found out that one of their best players was Gabriel Batistuta. I gradually found bits and pieces of information, translated it, and learned more about him and the national team. From afar I followed as best I could their qualifying for the 1994 World Cup.

Those of you who live in real soccer countries cannot understand what it is like in the USA especially before the 1994 World Cup. Nobody knew, nobody cared. I felt very alone and felt as if I was watching through a blurry telescope at something happening in another universe.

To make a long story shorter, I followed the NT through the 1994 World Cup and their unfortunate ending, then through the turbulence of the Passarella era, Bati's problems, Redondo's problems, the rise of the young group of players from the 1996 Olympics. All of this without the internet. I was still alone with my adopted team.

Then late in 1997 I got a computer at home with an internet connection and I found that there actually were other people out there who were interested in Argentina. I was not alone after all. It was like discovering life on another planet. That made such a huge difference for me. By then, I was pretty good at reading Spanish and through the internet I was able to access all of the main Argentina newspapers and even get information in English! That must sound very stupid and quaint to some of you, but it was a true revelation for me. A miracle of miracles.

The 1998 World Cup also ended in disappointment for Argentina and I felt very bad for the players, but I was so happy that Passarella was finally gone, taking with him his persecution of Batistuta.

The years from 1998 to 2002 were so much fun for me. Following players that I had struggled so hard to get to know through my previous translating efforts. The qualifying rounds were great, one match a month! That was heaven to be able to follow the scores on the internet and then hopefully Telemundo or Univision would run a tape. The team was almost the same as 1998 but with such an attitude difference. These players all were working together for the same goal. I don't know where anyone would get the idea that any of these players were arrogant or selfish or overconfident. They were not.

Four years I spent with these players. And now it's over. I cannot imagine the grief these men are feeling today. All that hope...gone.

I have learned so much from the Argentina team. I have found out alot about the country, the people, the continent of South America. I can even find Paraguay on a map, which most Americans cannot do, I'm sure. It has been worth every minute of time I spent and every bit of effort.

I still have my first copy of El Grafico. The player on the cover was Maradona. At the time I bought the magazine, I didn't know who he was. But I do now. And I can read it cover to cover without the help of a dictionary.


So sorry I bored you all with this.

But I have to say this one last thing to the Argentina national team:

"It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you. There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do."
 

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You seem to be very serious.

It's still a mystery to me though that you can have these emotions for another country's national team. I also think it's a mystery that people can adopt feelings for a club, which isn't even in your own country. And maybe haven't even seen that club in reality.

I guess it's a globalization thing. Which is nice as football can unite people from all over the world...
 

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Wow! That was an amazing post. I've been a fan of South American football for quite a while. I've been a huge fan of Argentina since 1994. In the last three World Cups, their team has been one of the most attractive. They come out to play football, and not play like cowards, packing men behind the ball and hoping for a counter-attack. That's why I support them, and could never support a team that plays like Sweden.
This has been a good group of players as well, no primadonnas. I don't know where people get that impression. And despite of what the English press says, they play clean football for the most part. They won the fair-play trophy at the last World Cup, I believe. They've got good young players, and good coaches, so they'll be back.
Tomorrow I'll be going to see Boca v.s River in the Orange Bowl in Miami. It would be good to see some of the next generation on show.
 

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Magic#10 said:
You seem to be very serious.

It's still a mystery to me though that you can have these emotions for another country's national team. I also think it's a mystery that people can adopt feelings for a club, which isn't even in your own country. And maybe haven't even seen that club in reality.

I guess it's a globalization thing. Which is nice as football can unite people from all over the world...
Simply coz its about following the great footballers and the great football nations as Brazil and Argentina.

Thats maybe why you don't find non-danish follow Denmark or Sweden..... and you find those people cheeringf or other NTs who produce a great football. :D
 

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thats my honorary argie!!!!:D

its good to have you here hum.
 
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it's the same with me.ever since the day argentina went out of the world cup,i can't seem to score a single goal in about 240 minutes i have played.it is amazing how much argentina affects my mind
 

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very well done Humbird! :cool:

i thought your fans stronger to resist any frustration.but sadness is still sadness,you cant deny.the more you fall for,the more you hurt youself.finally someone abreacted to resonant others.you are a true fan,Hum,im proud of you.:proud:

keep on,god will pay for you.
 
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But i hope all of us can remain strong and get up from where we have fallen.
 
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