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Says he was a Serbian triple-agent (who'm Ian Fleming based James Bond on) but his last name is Bulgarian and his father had the Turkish name Omer,

Suho, any ides who can lay claim to this womanizing legend?
 

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100% Serb-Bulgarian-Turko-Vlach-Albo-Venetian brigand employed Croat-Hercegovac.
 

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Says he was a Serbian triple-agent (who'm Ian Fleming based James Bond on) but his last name is Bulgarian and his father had the Turkish name Omer,

Suho, any ides who can lay claim to this womanizing legend?
Omer was his grandfather. Hard to know the true story about his background but most likely they were Muslims from Belgrade who converted to Orthodoxy some time in the early 1800s when they moved north into Austria-Hungary (Vojvodina). After the city was liberated most Belgrade Muslims if they didn't convert moved to Bosnia or one of the southern Ottoman-held territories. Omer or his father probably took the surname Popov because it was a good way to cover their Muslim roots (Popov meaning Son of [the] Priest). It's not necessarily just a Bulgarian surname.

They might have been Slavs originally or anything really (Belgrade was a melting pot). Duško grew up and was educated in Dubrovnik and spoke jekavian.

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Apparently his mother was German and his father simply Yugoslav according to historyonthenet.com.
His mother was probably Schwabian. On Duško's allegiances it's probably right to call him a unitary Yugoslav or simply a royalist. His brother Ivo was on King Petar's personal medical team and on account of his close ties to the Karađorđević's he was blacklisted by the Communists after the war. The whole family had their property confiscated and Duško and his brother lived abroad after the war. Ironically, the Croatian government returned their property in Dubrovnik but Serbia is yet to do so. One of his sons (Marko) from his second marriage only got citizenship last year and is fighting for restitution. Marko lives in Switzerland but spends a lot of time in Croatia (Dubrovnik) and Montenegro (Tivat).

Duško died in France on a British pension while Ivo died in exile on the Bahamas.
 

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Dima, the real story is not his etnicity but how Popov managed to convince everyone he was Fleming's inspiration for Bond.

Everything we associate with Bond - his penchant for beautiful women and fast cars to his degenerate gambling - is actually based on Fleming himself. Even the gambling scene that Popov claims is proof that he was Fleming's muse is a myth.

It would've been interesting had Popov come out with his story while the author was alive but, naturally, that wasn't the case.

Find some interviews with Fleming and he pretty much tells you where the original inspiration came from and it has nothing to do with Duško Popov (directly).

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Omer was his grandfather. Hard to know the true story about his background but most likely they were Muslims from Belgrade who converted to Orthodoxy some time in the early 1800s when they moved north into Austria-Hungary (Vojvodina). After the city was liberated most Belgrade Muslims if they didn't convert moved to Bosnia or one of the southern Ottoman-held territories. Omer or his father probably took the surname Popov because it was a good way to cover their Muslim roots (Popov meaning Son of [the] Priest). It's not necessarily just a Bulgarian surname.

They might have been Slavs originally or anything really (Belgrade was a melting pot). Duško grew up and was educated in Dubrovnik and spoke jekavian.

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Then he probably could be related to Izetbegovic. After all they were originally a muslim family from Belgrade.

btw Belgrade is also an ancient Hungarian city. In fact I wage that Most Serbs from the north are of Magyar descent (at least the cultured one's anyway)
 

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Bullshit, maybe the opposite is true.
you can thank me later...

The first record of the name Belograd appeared on April, 16th, 878, in a Papal missive[39] to Bulgarian ruler Boris I. This name would appear in several variants: Alba Bulgarica in Latin, Griechisch Weissenburg in High German, Nándorfehérvár in Hungarian, and Castelbianco in Venetian, among other names, all variations of 'white fortress'. For about four centuries, the city would become a battleground between the Byzantine Empire, the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, and the Bulgarian Empire.[40] Basil II (976–1025) installed a garrison in Belgrade.[41]
 
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