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Xtratime's Head of Humour 2007
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but no-one told me he was a complete idiot :eekani:

when we signed him people said he would moan at the coach if he wasn't in the team, that he would split the dressing room and slag off his fellow pros.

he has done none of this, has only good things to say about Wenger and the players, but he's an absolute nutter on the pitch, less aggressive than Rooney but really has the malfunction in his brain that sends him into idiot land at the flick of a switch.

what can be done about him ? :D


here's a good article if you haven't read it...................

Van Persie must make the most of his street cred
Robin of Highbury: Sculptor's son who couldn't stop playing football learned how to be patient. He will need to be
Jason Burt
27 February 2005


Robin van Persie's mind drifts back seven summers. He's on the streets of Kralingen, a suburb of Rotterdam, his home town. "It happened one time that it was really busy," the Arsenal striker recalls, "and everyone from all the other districts had come. Everyone. And we had a really good team because I'd brought over two players from the Feyenoord youth team. And another very good player from the streets, who I knew, and we had a fantastic goalkeeper. We won all day long. All day. I'll never forget it."

From the streets. Van Persie is talking about street football. The football that made him. That summer's day, on a makeshift, concrete five-a-side court, Van Persie's team won 40 times. Score two goals, from inside a five-yard area, on a pitch measuring maybe 25 yards, and you win. If you win you stay on. For as long as you can. "The team is different every time," Van Persie explains. "You just turn up and choose 'you, you, you'. When I was younger I played every day, no matter if it rained." If the sun shone, there were 20 teams. "So you play from early in the morning until 3pm," he says. "You have a cut-off point, otherwise you'd never stop." Sometimes they didn't.

Van Persie played street football, part of the sporting culture in Holland, from "five to about 17". Even when he was on the brink of the Feyenoord first team, he played. Even now he is on the brink of the Arsenal team he dreams of playing. "It's not easy," he says with a smile, "but maybe on vacation."

It's hard to let go because it was street football that fashioned this sculptor's son. "My left foot is because of the street," says the 21-year-old. "In the beginning it was poor. When I was eight, nine, 10. It was nothing. I didn't realise that it was good for me. But I like the game so I shot and shot and shot. Goal after goal." Marco van Basten, the Dutch coach, has commented on Van Persie's "great left foot", while Johan Cruyff placed him above Arjen Robben in terms of talent. *thanks best mates*:D


Van Persie learned something else on the streets: mental strength. "There were lots of better players than me," he says. "They were fantastic with the ball, with fantastic tricks. I know a lot of guys who were brilliant but not strong enough in the mind. When I go back to Holland, they say, 'I should have taken my chance. You took it and I'm proud of you'. And I say, 'You were 10 times better than me but you messed up'. If you want to make it in football you have to take your chances and be patient." So when his friends went out partying, he didn't.

It is a lesson he has held close since signing for Arsenal last May for £2.75m. "Everything was new; the money was new, the language was new," says Van Persie. And his wife, Bouchra, an economics student, was also new. The couple had only been married for two months before moving to England. "It's a different city, different country, different life. Friends and family come over, but only for a few days."

There was, not unnaturally, a period of adjustment that ended only last week when the Van Persies moved from a rented flat in Hampstead, north London, to their own home in Enfield. It's closer to the Arsenal training ground but also to team-mates such as Edu, Gaël Clichy and Jérémie Aliadière.

Last night, Van Persie was due to have dinner with another team-mate, Cesc Fabregas. "He's Spanish, I'm Dutch and it's a good thing," he says. "He's from another culture but that doesn't matter. It's one big family here and I believe everyone likes each other." No doubt yesterday's volatile Premiership match at Southampton, in which Van Persie was sent off, was the main topic of conversation.

The Arsenal "family" is headed by Patrick Vieira. "He's a real captain for us," says Van Persie, who laughs when he is reminded of the furore over Arsenal fielding a non-English XI. "I only realised that afterwards," he says. "But at a club like Arsenal it's just about getting the best players. That's what big clubs do. It's nothing to do with nationality."

It's what attracted him - he turned down offers from PSV Eindhoven and Seville after deciding to quit Feyenoord "for various reasons". Chief among those was his falling-out with the then coach, Bert van Marwijk, a strict disciplinarian who, at times, thought Van Persie, the darling of De Kuip since his debut at 17, needed taking down a peg or two. Eventually Van Persie was thrown into the reserves and his name blackened. It was hard to take.

"People were writing things about me that weren't true. I thought maybe I should try and make them love me, but after a few months I thought, 'Stop it, Robin. You are who you are'. People who know me know what I'm like, and that is what matters. But it was hard to take."

It was "a dream" when Arsenal called, even if his first training session was a shock. "I felt the difference straight away," Van Persie says. "I played 10 minutes each way and I was broken. I said to myself, 'I have to improve. I'm not strong enough'. I practised unbelievably hard. I was training, going home, having dinner and sleeping. And the next day the same." Van Persie's mind flitted back again to those street games. "I always played against older people. If I was 12, I played against guys who were 16. And that's a big difference. You have to be smarter than your opponent as well."

After two months with the big boys of Arsenal, "the boss thought I was ready". However, Arsène Wenger had also explained that Van Persie needed to remain patient. "He said young players have to adapt. It's better to play a few games than just one," the player says of his stop-start career so far. "But I knew that could happen. This is high-level, so you have to prepare for it. Here I know I'm a good player and I believe in myself, but here also there are players with more experience, fantastic players, better players."

Chief among those is, of course, his countryman Dennis Bergkamp. "I love to watch him," says Van Persie. "He's fantastic but he also plays for the team. And that's a great combination." Such is Bergkamp's form that, aged 35, there may be another year's contract. It could mean that Van Persie has to be even more patient. "He has to fight for his place and I have to also," he says. "I have great respect for him. He's been good to me and I think this season he's the one I've learned most from. In every training session he's unbelievable - with his touch and his mind. He's some player."

Bergkamp's three-match suspension - and that of Jose Antonio Reyes - after the incident against Sheffield United had given Van Persie his big chance, until he spurned it with yesterday's dismissal. Now Van Persie himself will be suspended. Like Bergkamp, he has that competitive edge, as his brush with Manchester United's Kieron Richardson in the Carling Cup showed. Maybe that, too, comes from the streets. "I always said I would wait," Van Persie says of his opportunity. Now the waiting must go on.

-------------------------------------------



so what do you reckon ? can he become a great player for us or is he just a complete madman who will go back to Holland and play for Vitesse or Henreenven ? :confused:
 

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I could have told you he can be a total idiot. But you didnt ask :) He is not the smartest person around, in fact he's... dumb :dielaugh:

He has a brilliant left foot so he is too good for Vitesse and the like. Dont give up on him just yet. There's always Charlton Athletic to dump him if he really disappoints you ;)
 

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Xtratime's Head of Humour 2007
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Discussion Starter #3
yeah he has talent in spades which is why he is so frustrating, if he had a brain he would be a very dangerous customer indeed. :shades:
 

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this guy has the potential to be one of the best in his position, especially under wengers wing...

i dont think his volatility will hamper him too much, hell just get sent off more! as he grows older hell mature and realise that he needs to remain calm, if not for himself, for the team...

terrific player, as an arsenal fan, wouldnt worry bout him too much
 

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Xtratime's Head of Humour 2007
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Discussion Starter #7
*OZ* said:
this guy has the potential to be one of the best in his position, especially under wengers wing...

i dont think his volatility will hamper him too much, hell just get sent off more! as he grows older hell mature and realise that he needs to remain calm, if not for himself, for the team...

terrific player, as an arsenal fan, wouldnt worry bout him too much
:eekani:

as a United fan you have not get the best intentions i suspect. ;)
 

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Jern Lizardhous said:
yeah he has talent in spades which is why he is so frustrating, if he had a brain he would be a very dangerous customer indeed. :shades:
That's why we have to keep Dennis around for awhile, even if he retires. A non-playing role at the club with Bergkamp still around would do wonders for Robin, IMO :pp getting sent off is an Arsenal tradition :D
 

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khimik said:
IMO getting sent off is an Arsenal tradition
:howler: :D


Yeah, just as I thought before, it's never easy to control him. Luckily we have someone like Dennis whom he can look up to, we would have much trouble 'taming' him without the Dutchmaster. Remember when several months after he came here, he just crashed his car and it was Dennis who settled the thing up for him in early morning when the sky is still dark.


Jern Lizardhous said:
There was, not unnaturally, a period of adjustment that ended only last week when the Van Persies moved from a rented flat in Hampstead, north London, to their own home in Enfield. It's closer to the Arsenal training ground but also to team-mates such as Edu, Gaël Clichy and Jérémie Aliadière.

Last night, Van Persie was due to have dinner with another team-mate, Cesc Fabregas. "He's Spanish, I'm Dutch and it's a good thing," he says. "He's from another culture but that doesn't matter. It's one big family here and I believe everyone likes each other." No doubt yesterday's volatile Premiership match at Southampton, in which Van Persie was sent off, was the main topic of conversation.

Victoria Concordia Crescit... :proud: :stuckup: :star:
 

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van persie was stupid for getting off - but one thing peeps have failed to mention that fabregas is then even more stupid!

his tackle on a sheffield utd player was far worse - but didnt get tha appropriate punishment! RVP11 has and he will learn.

wenger likes this boy very much..... after all, he isnt exactly jermaine pennant.

im a big RVP11 fan..... i really wanna see him do well. he will learn from what he has done!
 

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Xtratime's Head of Humour 2007
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Discussion Starter #11
mixmastermatt said:
van persie was stupid for getting off - but one thing peeps have failed to mention that fabregas is then even more stupid!

his tackle on a sheffield utd player was far worse - but didnt get tha appropriate punishment! RVP11 has and he will learn.

wenger likes this boy very much..... after all, he isnt exactly jermaine pennant.

im a big RVP11 fan..... i really wanna see him do well. he will learn from what he has done!

Fabregas tackle was bad but that was completely out of character and he'd just been stamped on the head and seen HIS teammate been sent off, i can honestly say if Wenger had told Fabregas to be careful five minutes before that he wouldn't have done it, RvP on the other hand. :nono:

RvP does seem overly nice but dim, i just hope he can grow a few brain cells in the coming months.
 

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Xtratime's Head of Humour 2007
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Discussion Starter #12
Cole refuses to blame Van Persie

1 March 2005

Ashley Cole insists Arsenal players do not blame Robin van Persie for the "crazy" loss of self-control leaving them with a striker crisis for tonight's FA Cup replay at Sheffield United.

Van Persie was sent off for a second bookable offence in last weekend's draw at Southampton, even though his side were playing against 10 men after David Prutton's dismissal.

The consequences of his actions were emphasised when Thierry Henry was forced to pull out of tonight's game with an Achilles injury.


It leaves Arsenal with no fully-fit senior strikers, as van Persie is serving a one-match ban, while Dennis Bergkamp and Jose Antonio Reyes are also sidelined through suspension.

While Freddie Ljungberg could be a support striker, Robert Pires is out injured along with Edu, Gilberto Silva and Sol Campbell - leaving either 17-year-old Arturo Lupoli or 18-year-old Quincy Owusu-Abeyie to start at Bramall Lane.

All this for a game which Arsenal, whose Premiership and Champions League hopes are in the balance, cannot afford to lose.

But while Arsene Wenger made clear his frustration at van Persie's indiscipline after Saturday's game, Cole insists the Holland Under-21 international would learn from his mistake.

Asked if van Persie had let the side down, Cole maintained: "Of course not. I've done it before and I hope they didn't blame me for anything.

"We're not going to blame anyone. It's something that just happens on the spur of the moment.

"Maybe it could have been different if we'd had 11 against 10 but things happen and players do get sent off. We did okay with 10 men but of course they scored a good goal.

"Of course he'll learn. I've been sent off a couple of times now and it's just one of those things when you go a bit crazy for one or two seconds. But no one is putting the blame on him."

Quincy and Lupoli have shown their promise in the Carling Cup campaign this season, with both having been on target in the 3-1 home win against a near full-strength Everton side last November.

If Ljungberg does move into the attack, there are no natural wide players left in the squad, with Gael Clichy set to fill in on the left flank and either Cesc Fabregas or Mathieu Flamini expected to be asked to play out of position on the right side.

Cole, 24, told the club's website, www.arsenal.com: "The FA Cup is vital for us. Hopefully we can get a good result as we do seem to do well in the competition.

"It's going to be tough but I think we've got the squad to deal with it. We're going to miss key players like Robert Pires, but hopefully someone else can come in and do a good job, like they always do."


--------------------------------------------------------

ASHLEY, WE BLAME HIM :fero: :D
 

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Jern Lizardhous said:
but no-one told me he was a complete idiot :eekani:
why should we tell you? :lala: :angel: :D we would have got even less for him had we done so :groan: :mad:

while you're at it, get Vd Vaart, the next Bergkamp :lala: :thmbup:
 

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Jern Lizardhous said:
but no-one told me he was a complete idiot :eekani:

when we signed him people said he would moan at the coach if he wasn't in the team, that he would split the dressing room and slag off his fellow pros.

he has done none of this, has only good things to say about Wenger and the players, but he's an absolute nutter on the pitch, less aggressive than Rooney but really has the malfunction in his brain that sends him into idiot land at the flick of a switch.

what can be done about him ? :D


here's a good article if you haven't read it...................

Van Persie must make the most of his street cred
Robin of Highbury: Sculptor's son who couldn't stop playing football learned how to be patient. He will need to be
Jason Burt
27 February 2005


Robin van Persie's mind drifts back seven summers. He's on the streets of Kralingen, a suburb of Rotterdam, his home town. "It happened one time that it was really busy," the Arsenal striker recalls, "and everyone from all the other districts had come. Everyone. And we had a really good team because I'd brought over two players from the Feyenoord youth team. And another very good player from the streets, who I knew, and we had a fantastic goalkeeper. We won all day long. All day. I'll never forget it."

From the streets. Van Persie is talking about street football. The football that made him. That summer's day, on a makeshift, concrete five-a-side court, Van Persie's team won 40 times. Score two goals, from inside a five-yard area, on a pitch measuring maybe 25 yards, and you win. If you win you stay on. For as long as you can. "The team is different every time," Van Persie explains. "You just turn up and choose 'you, you, you'. When I was younger I played every day, no matter if it rained." If the sun shone, there were 20 teams. "So you play from early in the morning until 3pm," he says. "You have a cut-off point, otherwise you'd never stop." Sometimes they didn't.

Van Persie played street football, part of the sporting culture in Holland, from "five to about 17". Even when he was on the brink of the Feyenoord first team, he played. Even now he is on the brink of the Arsenal team he dreams of playing. "It's not easy," he says with a smile, "but maybe on vacation."

It's hard to let go because it was street football that fashioned this sculptor's son. "My left foot is because of the street," says the 21-year-old. "In the beginning it was poor. When I was eight, nine, 10. It was nothing. I didn't realise that it was good for me. But I like the game so I shot and shot and shot. Goal after goal." Marco van Basten, the Dutch coach, has commented on Van Persie's "great left foot", while Johan Cruyff placed him above Arjen Robben in terms of talent. *thanks best mates*:D


Van Persie learned something else on the streets: mental strength. "There were lots of better players than me," he says. "They were fantastic with the ball, with fantastic tricks. I know a lot of guys who were brilliant but not strong enough in the mind. When I go back to Holland, they say, 'I should have taken my chance. You took it and I'm proud of you'. And I say, 'You were 10 times better than me but you messed up'. If you want to make it in football you have to take your chances and be patient." So when his friends went out partying, he didn't.

It is a lesson he has held close since signing for Arsenal last May for £2.75m. "Everything was new; the money was new, the language was new," says Van Persie. And his wife, Bouchra, an economics student, was also new. The couple had only been married for two months before moving to England. "It's a different city, different country, different life. Friends and family come over, but only for a few days."

There was, not unnaturally, a period of adjustment that ended only last week when the Van Persies moved from a rented flat in Hampstead, north London, to their own home in Enfield. It's closer to the Arsenal training ground but also to team-mates such as Edu, Gaël Clichy and Jérémie Aliadière.

Last night, Van Persie was due to have dinner with another team-mate, Cesc Fabregas. "He's Spanish, I'm Dutch and it's a good thing," he says. "He's from another culture but that doesn't matter. It's one big family here and I believe everyone likes each other." No doubt yesterday's volatile Premiership match at Southampton, in which Van Persie was sent off, was the main topic of conversation.

The Arsenal "family" is headed by Patrick Vieira. "He's a real captain for us," says Van Persie, who laughs when he is reminded of the furore over Arsenal fielding a non-English XI. "I only realised that afterwards," he says. "But at a club like Arsenal it's just about getting the best players. That's what big clubs do. It's nothing to do with nationality."

It's what attracted him - he turned down offers from PSV Eindhoven and Seville after deciding to quit Feyenoord "for various reasons". Chief among those was his falling-out with the then coach, Bert van Marwijk, a strict disciplinarian who, at times, thought Van Persie, the darling of De Kuip since his debut at 17, needed taking down a peg or two. Eventually Van Persie was thrown into the reserves and his name blackened. It was hard to take.

"People were writing things about me that weren't true. I thought maybe I should try and make them love me, but after a few months I thought, 'Stop it, Robin. You are who you are'. People who know me know what I'm like, and that is what matters. But it was hard to take."

It was "a dream" when Arsenal called, even if his first training session was a shock. "I felt the difference straight away," Van Persie says. "I played 10 minutes each way and I was broken. I said to myself, 'I have to improve. I'm not strong enough'. I practised unbelievably hard. I was training, going home, having dinner and sleeping. And the next day the same." Van Persie's mind flitted back again to those street games. "I always played against older people. If I was 12, I played against guys who were 16. And that's a big difference. You have to be smarter than your opponent as well."

After two months with the big boys of Arsenal, "the boss thought I was ready". However, Arsène Wenger had also explained that Van Persie needed to remain patient. "He said young players have to adapt. It's better to play a few games than just one," the player says of his stop-start career so far. "But I knew that could happen. This is high-level, so you have to prepare for it. Here I know I'm a good player and I believe in myself, but here also there are players with more experience, fantastic players, better players."

Chief among those is, of course, his countryman Dennis Bergkamp. "I love to watch him," says Van Persie. "He's fantastic but he also plays for the team. And that's a great combination." Such is Bergkamp's form that, aged 35, there may be another year's contract. It could mean that Van Persie has to be even more patient. "He has to fight for his place and I have to also," he says. "I have great respect for him. He's been good to me and I think this season he's the one I've learned most from. In every training session he's unbelievable - with his touch and his mind. He's some player."

Bergkamp's three-match suspension - and that of Jose Antonio Reyes - after the incident against Sheffield United had given Van Persie his big chance, until he spurned it with yesterday's dismissal. Now Van Persie himself will be suspended. Like Bergkamp, he has that competitive edge, as his brush with Manchester United's Kieron Richardson in the Carling Cup showed. Maybe that, too, comes from the streets. "I always said I would wait," Van Persie says of his opportunity. Now the waiting must go on.

-------------------------------------------



so what do you reckon ? can he become a great player for us or is he just a complete madman who will go back to Holland and play for Vitesse or Henreenven ? :confused:

Nice article :thumbsup:

I really like Van persie and I understand his fiery temper. Living in a roughish area -the softer area of hackney (stoke newington) I think I can relate to him. When you play football on the street you may get the occasional insult etc. etc. because they think/know they are better than you. It is not always easy to ignore especially if you play on a consistent basis.

So he had to toughen up quite straight forward he even said so.
 

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Jern Lizardhous said:
:eekani:

as a United fan you have not get the best intentions i suspect. ;)

dunno what ure talking about... if i was wenger i would even encourage him to get sent off..builds character (or something like that) :) .. and maybe dish out a few slaps to the opposition, theyll respect him for it :sweeteye:
 

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Wally said:
while you're at it, get Vd Vaart, the next Bergkamp :lala: :thmbup:
After a while, I think I have to stop dreaming and must admit that there's no such 'next Bergkamp'. In my honest opinion, Bergkamp is a true world class player whose name is as big as Baggio, Romario, Laudrup, etc. And in Holland, the only players who really exceeded him in talents are Cruyff and Van Basten. What Arsenal got when Rioch signed him is not merely a star footballer, but a legend for his country. He is a class of his own. So I started to doubt that those young players really have the capabilities to replace him. I used to think both Reyes and Van der Vaart are the biggest talents of support striker. But as good as they're in their age, no one of them can beat Bergkamp's achievement in that age.

But as admire of VDV, I'd welcome him any days. Maybe Bergy will give him some tips about how to live ordinary life for him and Sylphie. :D
 

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VDV is too much of a pretty boy diva to be the "next Bergkamp". Dennis is a quiet and humble man. :stuckup:
 

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i think the biggest problem for the so called "next Begkamp's" is the way they all live.
Dennis is a very down to earth family guy. toned down sense of dressing. look at the next bergkamp's:
1. Bently: Loud dresser, bright character
2. Van P: Read above
3. VdV: Unsure but KHIMIK seems to think same as the 2 above.

i feel that there is a correlation between your off feild life and your performances on it, read Jermaine Pennant!
 
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