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Atalanta President Ivan Ruggeri has warned that many clubs face bankruptcy as early as October due to the new financial climate in football.


“All the clubs will be able to register for the new season and balance the books during the summer,” said the patron, “but by October some of these sides will go under because they can’t pay the wage bills.”


“With a dip in the pay-per-view television rights and less mad spending on the transfer market, there just won’t be enough to go around. All of the Serie B clubs are balanced on a knife edge.”


Ruggeri also claimed that this situation was not solely a risk for the second division sides in Italy.


“Even in Serie A there are 14 clubs at risk of bankruptcy, but some people want to keep this quiet.”


“The big clubs have always controlled everything,” added the Atalanta owner, “and there are four sides ruling over 34 others. Something has to change, even if it means intervention from the Government.”


The issue of how the pay-per-view profits are divided among the clubs has been one of the most controversial issues in attempts to elect a new League President.


Meanwhile, Ruggeri also looked to his own team as Atalanta began their pre-season preparations this afternoon.


“Cristiano Doni and many others were ready for the big time, but the offers that came in were simply shameful. They are professionals and know that if they stay at this club then they will give 100%.”


The team will start their training in Salice Termi before moving on to Sarre (Aosta) and San Pellegrino Terme (Bergamo).


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I also have the same feeling. Juve, Inter, Milan and Roma know that the other clubs are desperate for money and use this fact in the negotiation for players like Nesta and Cannavaro. I think it's a disgrace. It's not good for anyone. Not even themselves.
 

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Fuoriclasse
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VERDI said:
It's not good for anyone. Not even themselves.
Hold on. What exactly are you trying to say? Do you imply that it would be in the rich clubs own interest to buy at more costs?
 

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i hope INTER won't be one of those 14 clubs... :cry:
 

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Actually, Juve and Atalanta both have budgets in the black, so I assume they are two of the clubs who aren't at risk...who are the other two?
 

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What a surprise :rolleyes:

lousy management the last 7 years is finally showing its signs.
The cubs have nobody but themselves to blame.
Mediocre players have been bought for patheticly high fees, and the same players have been give ridiclusly high wages.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Re: "There are 14 clubs at risk of bankruptcy in Serie A"

stephañho said:

Hold on. What exactly are you trying to say? Do you imply that it would be in the rich clubs own interest to buy at more costs?
Not exactly. But why do you think Juventus, Milan and Inter practically give money to Fiorentina so that they won't go bankrupt? They understand that Serie A will be less attractive for sponsors, star players and media if the competitive edge disappear. Serie A NEED to have many competitive teams if they don't want to fall even further behind Germany, Spain and England.
 

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Fair enough. But then again, if I'm not mistaken there are few rich Spanish (for instance) sides in the elite compared to Italy and I'm nearly convinced these minnows are just as advantaged as the Italian one's regarding transfers. I reckon many parameters are involved in Spain, England and Germany being above right now. Back to the subject. It's the law of the Jungle.

The money loaded (but somehow stingy - unless it's a mediatic operation) established clubs have the upper hand when it comes to transfers and beneath them, the smaller teams (either the one's with no ambition or -in Fiorentina's case- the one's in a dodgy situation economically wise) have no rights but to keep their mouth shut. They deem themselves cheated on with a proposed move and therefore they want to tell the opportunist club to take a hike, they can't. Firstly, the club 5 takes no refusal from the others. And secondly, the dream of every player (Italians for instance - numerous in Italy :D) is to join a Giant and if the small club (that they perceive as a vitrine that stands as a launch ramp) screw their chances, the players will always find some way to convince - boycott, under-performances, etc.

Big clubs profit of conjoncturial circumstances and you cannot blame them for that. It's selfish and not necessarily for the better of the game. But that's the way it is. Why exactly would they take the chance of putting themselves in the red in second outfit moves, to say things as they are? The wage pressure is titanesque in the Italian elite and noone is safe from decay. That goes for every club because most of them tend to spend as much as they earn, but not for the same things. Sometimes, I wonder why so much money is put on a nothing special player, do you really want these sums to increase even more? Small clubs have always been living on the edge, they always went thru difficult times and it will remain so. For want of a global new philosophy in the Italian game, it has to remain so.

Ciao.
 

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Friday, July 12, 2002
Italy's stars 'ready for pay cut'
By Simon Evans

ROME, July 12 (Reuters) - Soccer players in Italy are ready to accept performance-related pay, including a possible 20 percent wages-cut if relegated, as Serie A attempts to deal with its cash crisis, says players' union chief Sergio Campana.
Players' wages have doubled in Italy over the past four years while clubs' income has barely risen, leaving many teams facing hefty debts.

Campana, president of the Italian Footballers Union (AIC), says the players are ready to accept flexible terms in their contracts.

'From now on the contracts will be flexible. One part will be fixed another part will be based on performance - results, goals scored or saved and other factors,' Campana told the daily Gazzetta dello Sport.

'This means the players have accepted the principle that they will get enough and the extra will only come if the club gains additional resources.'

The union chief said he was ready for talks with Italian soccer officials in a bid to reach an accord on pay, adding that a new deal could include an automatic 20 percent pay cut for players whose teams are relegated.

Italian newspapers released details on Friday of the top earners in Serie A with Inter Milan's Uruguayan striker Alvaro Recoba topping the table with an annual salary of 8million euros ($7.9million).

Roma's Argentine striker Gabriel Batistuta and their Italian captain Francesco Totti are reported to be earning 6 million euros ($5.9million) while Inter Milan's Brazilian World Cup winner Ronaldo is estimated to be on 4.5 million euros ($4.4million).

The fear that such high labour costs could be put clubs finances in danger appears to be being borne out by the unusually quiet transfer market during the close season.

Even the normally free-spending big clubs have restricted themselves to swap deals and free transfers, with cash deals at just a tiny fraction of previous close seasons.

It is clear that a league once renowned for attracting the best players in the world on the basis of the 'lure of the lira' is suffering from a severe shortage of capital.

Figures released recently by accounting firm Deloitte and Touche for the 2000-2001 season show that players' wages in Serie A rose 32 percent from the previous year, while the clubs' income hardly rose at all and ticket revenue fell.

The result was a loss of 133 million euros ($131 million) for Serie A as a whole compared with a profit of 35 million euros ($34.5 million) the previous year.

To add to the problem, eight clubs from the top two divisions have yet to sign television deals for next season, casting even more doubt over their financial futures.

The new Serie A season is scheduled to kick off on September 1, although Roma president Franco Sensi has suggested a postponement until October to give clubs time to resolve their budget problems, a suggestion that is unlikely, however, to win many backers.

soccernet ;)
 

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I think it's time we realise the money and hype surrounding these players is largely unjustified and players should be rewarded for their work more than anything else.

There is no doubt many clubs can blame themselves for getting into this situation, but it's not entirely limited to Italy... look at how Bradford City ended up in administration and sacking 19 players, because they allowed their squad and wage bill to become fat and more than they could afford.
 

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BigIzz said:
Actually, Juve and Atalanta both have budgets in the black, so I assume they are two of the clubs who aren't at risk...who are the other two?
no surprises there aither :rolleyes:

people always talking about how juve were always stingy spenders, and the 00/01 season was one helluva surprise.


it seems the price to pay for winning a scudetto is to risk bankruptcy- lazio, milan and roma especially
 

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David Votoupal said:
I think it's time we realise the money and hype surrounding these players is largely unjustified and players should be rewarded for their work more than anything else.
Well said...well said...

Maybe it's time club management take a refresher in Business 101...
 
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