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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to this forum and I do apologize if this is a topic that's already been widely discussed. However, we're running a thread on a Norwegian forum (http://vgd.no/sport/fotball-internasjonal/tema/1784865/tittel/sovjetfotballens-nostalgitraad "Soviet football - nostalgia thread") and there's a few of us who are still in awe of the Soviet World Cup squads from 1982 and 1986, despite their lack of final success. I myself remember very well what happened during spring of '86 with Dinamo Kiev, and obviously the subsequent World Cup failure when losing to Belgium in the first cup game of the tournament, but despite that 4-3 defeat (I watched the full 120 mins + from Youtube only last week and it is still painful to see how weakly the mighty SSSR defended in that game) the legend lives on. There was so much talent in that team, as seen through Dinamo Kiev's stylish Cup Winners' Cup triumph only a few weeks prior to the World Cup, with the Soviet team obviously consisting predominantly of Kiev players.

My question: does there exist documentaries produced on this wonderful team apart from what you can find on Youtube, whether it be literature or videos? And if so, where would I need to turn to in order to order such material?

I may remember quite well '86 but I am also very much in awe of the '82 team, which had not lost a game in, what, two years prior to that opening day defeat by the 'mighty' Brazilians? That was such a wonderful team, and I am very interested in learning more about Soviet football from the 80s. If someone is able to introduce me to any kind of material regarding this, I would be very grateful.

Sincerely
Joachim, Oslo
 

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Robert Edelman writes about Soviet football and sports history in English. He has a book on the history of Spartak. Most of his cited sources tend to be Russian texts, though, so there might not be a whole lot out there in English or Norwegian. If you can read Russian, then perhaps Aksel Vartanian would be a good place to start. Admittedly, I haven't read any books by Vartanian but Edelman cites him (both in personal interviews as well as his publications on Soviet football) frequently. Some of his stuff can be found online (in Russian)--see the links in the Bibliography section on his Wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aksel_Vartanyan
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much for your reply.

I did study Russian at university for two years (94&95) but sadly, I have not had a great chance to use what I learnt back then, hence my understanding of the Russian language today is as feeble as the SSSR defence in that Belgium game. But perhaps reading any of Vartanian's publications could help me revive my skills? I will definitely look into what he has to offer and from what I understand through what you're saying, he has produced some quality material on various topics.

Another aspect I am fascinated about is how players from smaller Soviet republics, such as Georgia, Armenia and sometimes Lithuania were able to make an impact on the international scene, among playes from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Obviously, with Dinamo Tbilisi being so strong for a sustained period of time, and I guess the same can also be said about Ararat Jerevan and, perhaps to a lesser extent, also Zalgiris of Vilnius, footballers from these republics were given the opportunity to play with the ones from the bigger republics in the Soviet national team. All these points are fascinating aspects of the past.

Thank you again.
 

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Thank you very much for your reply.

I did study Russian at university for two years (94&95) but sadly, I have not had a great chance to use what I learnt back then, hence my understanding of the Russian language today is as feeble as the SSSR defence in that Belgium game. But perhaps reading any of Vartanian's publications could help me revive my skills? I will definitely look into what he has to offer and from what I understand through what you're saying, he has produced some quality material on various topics.

Another aspect I am fascinated about is how players from smaller Soviet republics, such as Georgia, Armenia and sometimes Lithuania were able to make an impact on the international scene, among playes from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Obviously, with Dinamo Tbilisi being so strong for a sustained period of time, and I guess the same can also be said about Ararat Jerevan and, perhaps to a lesser extent, also Zalgiris of Vilnius, footballers from these republics were given the opportunity to play with the ones from the bigger republics in the Soviet national team. All these points are fascinating aspects of the past.

Thank you again.
Replace them with Georgia and you got it. I can't recall any Lithuanian players playing for the NT side.
 

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I'm new to this forum and I do apologize if this is a topic that's already been widely discussed. However, we're running a thread on a Norwegian forum (http://vgd.no/sport/fotball-internasjonal/tema/1784865/tittel/sovjetfotballens-nostalgitraad "Soviet football - nostalgia thread") and there's a few of us who are still in awe of the Soviet World Cup squads from 1982 and 1986, despite their lack of final success. I myself remember very well what happened during spring of '86 with Dinamo Kiev, and obviously the subsequent World Cup failure when losing to Belgium in the first cup game of the tournament, but despite that 4-3 defeat (I watched the full 120 mins + from Youtube only last week and it is still painful to see how weakly the mighty SSSR defended in that game) the legend lives on. There was so much talent in that team, as seen through Dinamo Kiev's stylish Cup Winners' Cup triumph only a few weeks prior to the World Cup, with the Soviet team obviously consisting predominantly of Kiev players.

My question: does there exist documentaries produced on this wonderful team apart from what you can find on Youtube, whether it be literature or videos? And if so, where would I need to turn to in order to order such material?

I may remember quite well '86 but I am also very much in awe of the '82 team, which had not lost a game in, what, two years prior to that opening day defeat by the 'mighty' Brazilians? That was such a wonderful team, and I am very interested in learning more about Soviet football from the 80s. If someone is able to introduce me to any kind of material regarding this, I would be very grateful.

Sincerely
Joachim, Oslo
Not predominantly, there were 10 or 11 if I'm not mistaken. 1982 had a better team but a number of factors, mainly the divided locker room and poor officiating against Brazil derailed them.
 

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the three coaches technical team idea for 82 was typical soviet madness.:proud:

beskov, Akhalkatsi(dynamo tybilisi) and Lobanovsky all ended up stifling each other, favouring their own players and giving contradictory messages to the team.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I can't recall any Lithuanian players playing for the NT side.
Didn't Žalgiris Vilnius provide a couple of internationals late in the 80s? Sukristovas springs to mind here. Not exactly what you would call a 'carrier of proud Soviet football traditions' I guess, but nevertheless at least briefly part of the team. But anyway, you know way better than me and I am happy for any information. After all, that's why I created the thread in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Not predominantly, there were 10 or 11 if I'm not mistaken. 1982 had a better team but a number of factors, mainly the divided locker room and poor officiating against Brazil derailed them.
I guess the world has seen better use of the word 'predominantly'. Didn't Nikolaj Larionov from Zenit Leningrad feature as well as Rinat Dasajev in the opening match versus the Hungarians? So that would make at least two Russians.

Interesting to read this about the internal conflicts among the 1982 squad. Undoubtedly, the team was vastly talented and could have gone further than they did, but if coaches from different republics were favouring their own players and not cooperating well, I guess it was a credit to the quality in the squad that they did as well as they did.
 

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Replace them with Georgia and you got it. I can't recall any Lithuanian players playing for the NT side.
A lithuanian player was in the roster for 88 euro and other in 88 olympics.

narbekovas e surkristov i think.

zalgiris had a good squad in the 80's.
 

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Not predominantly, there were 10 or 11 if I'm not mistaken. 1982 had a better team but a number of factors, mainly the divided locker room and poor officiating against Brazil derailed them.
They got the easier group by finishing second (Poland/Belgium) as opposed to (Italy/Argentina) and still messed it up. I love the 80s teams but they choked far too many times. Now I understand they may have had some difficulties with the political bias but still, mainly themselves to blame imo.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Akhalkatsi(dynamo tybilisi)
Tbilisi were obviously a great force in Soviet (and European) football at the time, and with players like Kipiani, Chivadze, Daraselia, Sulakvelidze and Shengelia how could they not be? I must admit to not knowing a great deal about Akhalkatsi though - what could be said about him? Was he a typical authoritative leader à la most of what we've seen from other major Soviet teams? It does indeed sound like a star-studded line-up in that management team, but I guess they found it difficult to pull together in the same direction.

Anyone has anything to share regarding what the official announcements were for why players such as Cherenkov and Kipiani didn't make the '82 squad?
 
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