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What do you think about this wonderfull player, would he be the star of the WC2002....
 

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There is no doubt that skillful Shinji will prosper in the world cup with his vision. Only problem with Japan is that with Ono and Nakata, they'll have two central attacking midfielders! will Troussier then play one of these superstars in another position?
 

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Was that Kawaguchi guy in goal? he was terrible in England!!

and seeing that you are a sampdoria fan, how is good old Attilio Lombardo doing at your club?
 

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Shinji will be playing on the left side in the world cup.
the problem in Japan NT is that there are many good playmakers and no good FWs.
NAKATA, ONO, NAKAMURA, and OGASAWARA are all in the same position. NAKAMURA and OGASAWARA can be a world class player in the near future. actually NAKAMURA will go to Real Madrid after the world cup.
we need decent FWs to get goals.
 

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tokio_2002 said:
Shinji will be playing on the left side in the world cup.
Hey tokio, I heard that Alex, the Brazilian born player, will occupy that place instead of Ono!
Is that true?
 

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i think Troussier will use Alex as a joker.
he can change the situation by himself with a fast and tricky dribble.

since Troussier didn't test Ono in an another position recently he will be put on the left side.
the balance of left and right is also important.
when Troussier use Alex on the left, the right side have to concentrate on defense.

which position will Ono play in Feyenoord in the next season ?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
tokio_2002 said:
i think Troussier will use Alex as a joker.
he can change the situation by himself with a fast and tricky dribble.

since Troussier didn't test Ono in an another position recently he will be put on the left side.
the balance of left and right is also important.
when Troussier use Alex on the left, the right side have to concentrate on defense.

which position will Ono play in Feyenoord in the next season ?
Probably behind the striker. His magnificent passing and vision will lead to numerous goals. Else he can play defensive midfield. He played e.g. v Bommel against PSV and won almost al duels.
 

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tokio_2002 said:
i think Troussier will use Alex as a joker.
he can change the situation by himself with a fast and tricky dribble.
I feel pity for Shunsuke Nakamura who is really stepped aside since Alex join the NT!
I think Alex will be the starter as left midfielder and Ono will be placed in other spot, maybe in central midfield along with Nakata... :)
 

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Vinnie said:

Probably behind the striker. His magnificent passing and vision will lead to numerous goals. Else he can play defensive midfield. He played e.g. v Bommel against PSV and won almost al duels.
the best position to do his job would be behind the striker. he showed great performances in this position when he was in Urawa Reds. the velvet passes from Ono will make a lot of goals in the next season.
 

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Bodat said:


I feel pity for Shunsuke Nakamura who is really stepped aside since Alex join the NT!
I think Alex will be the starter as left midfielder and Ono will be placed in other spot, maybe in central midfield along with Nakata... :)
Nakamura, Ono, Nakata ... they are all playmaker unfortunately.
we may see Ono in the left of 3 bolante.
 

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At this moment at Feyenoord, Ono plays as one of the two controlling midfielders, more specifally the left of the two. He can also play behing the striker but has not played that well in that position. He's best when he got play in front of him. He is also very good and cool when defending.

He's also played as right and left winger, but really that does not justify his immense talent IMO. He need to play in the ax of a squad.
 

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Shinji got a red card today:eek:

But still we managed to win 3-2 against Heerenveen and now we're in the preliminary round of the CL next season.

Btw, it was two times yellow, and before he got of the field he made a typical Japanese little bow and got a standing ovation for a terrific season at Feyenoord. The crowd loves this man.

I hope Shinji shines in the UEFA CUP final. The first Japanese player to play in any Euro cup final!
 

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Shunsuke Nakamura begun the J-league very well this year, after he played really badly in 2001, so Troussier will have some more doubts for midfield positions.... Shinji Ono could play as a left volante, but do not forget that Inamoto also plays in that position.... too many good players in Japanese midfield!!! I think that Alex should play as a forward, or Japan should play with only one true FW. My team (3-4-1-2) : Y.Kawaguchi - Nakazawa, Miyamoto, R.Morioka - Hato, Myojin, Inamoto,S.Ono - H.Nakata - Yanagisawa, Alex.
 

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Speaking of Japan's problems at the Forward position, isn't Naohiro Takahara possibly an absence from this year's World Cup? I heard that he is in the hospital and having some breathing problems. Although he struggled at Boca Juniors, he is still capable of getting the strikes that count.
 

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his doctor says Takahara has 50/50 % chances to make it before the world cup.
even if he returned to the national team by then he won't be in best condition. he was my first choice as FW.
God, this punishment is too hard for me !
 

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this is a long article from onefootball...

PROFILE Shirt-seller turned defence-splitter

Tuesday 7th May 2002

by Simon Kuper

Shinji Ono arrived in Europe last summer as a device to sell merchandise, a joke, a story about how weird the Japanese are.

Now he is the only Japanese footballer with a regular place in a decent European team and on Wednesday he may win the Uefa Cup with Feyenoord. Watch out him for at the World Cup.

It wasn't easy becoming a great Japanese footballer.

Ono spent his childhood kicking a tennis ball against a wall with both feet, and at high school played for a team coached by a former rugby player. Whenever the team lost, Ono, as captain, would be thrashed by the coach.

Aged 18, he was the youngest member of the Japan squad at the last World Cup.

Playing for the Urawa Red Diamonds, Ono met a lonely Yugoslav named Zjelko Petrovic who had come to Japan without his family.

Ono's parents adopted Petrovic as another son, forever inviting him to eat and watch TV at their house. So when Feyenoord asked Petrovic if he knew any decent Japanese players, he was only ever going to mention one. Ono went to Rotterdam.

"What have they bought now? A Japanese?" some Feyenoord players are said to have sneered.

No one could think of Ono as a footballer. Even the club's coach, Bert van Marwijk, seemed to consider him a species of shirt salesman, hired to help shift Feyenoord kit to millions of gullible Japanese consumers.

Dutch journalists were less interested in Ono than in the hordes of Japanese journalists who pursued his every step, many of them from the luxury of the Rotterdam Hilton. Ono was the only footballer in Holland who had to give weekly press conferences - like the Dutch prime minister, it was noted.

Van Marwijk quickly tired of the circus. Asked the 43,683rd Ono question after a pre-season friendly against Southampton, he exploded into a rant against the poor youngster.

"I'm not intending to give him a first-team place," the coach shouted at the Japanese journalists, who for months afterwards were terrified of asking him anything. Japanese courtesy and Dutch bluntness do not mix.

It was also thought that Ono was not physical enough even for Dutch football. The Japanese game is rather ethereal, with little man-to-man combat.

At 1.75 metres and 74 kilogrammes, Ono is neither anorexic nor a dwarf, but European stereotypes about the Japanese die hard.

However, at a training session last August the player amazed his team-mates by regularly winning headers against Feyenoord's centre-back Ferry de Haan, who is 15 centimetres taller.

In the season's first league match, Feyenoord were hammering neighbours Sparta so thoroughly that Van Marwijk thought he might as well give his Japanese a run-out.

In ten minutes on the field, Ono twice put a team-mate in front of the keeper. Soon he was a regular. Though he kept saying he wanted to learn from Feyenoord, it quickly became apparent that his team-mates might learn more from him.

Ono, strange to say, is a classic Dutch footballer: he reads the game, plays for the team and his great weapon is the pass. In fact, he can split defences better than anyone else in Holland today. He has been integral to Feyenoord's surprising run to the Uefa Cup final. Before long he may outgrow the club.

He has also made himself beloved within the team - a hard feat for an outsider at a European club.

Sent off after two yellow cards in the crunch match against Heerenveen the other day, he turned after walking off the field and bowed at his team-mates. It was a beautiful gesture of contrition.

So far he has played mostly at left-half, but with Jon Dahl Tomasson leaving Feyenoord for AC Milan, Ono will probably be making the play from central midfield next season.

He can function everywhere, though. In March, in the Polish industrial town of Lodz, I saw him perform faultlessly at left-back as Japan demolished Poland 2-0.

Recently I asked Van Marwijk what he thought of Ono now. "He can now fight much more," the coach replied. "It was a matter of getting used to our football - he was used to a different sort of game. He is multifunctional. And two-footed."

It must be said that Ono has thrived at Feyenoord partly because the Dutch league is poor. He has had it easier than Junichi Inamoto at Arsenal or Hidetoshi Nakata at Parma.

But it would be silly to do him down. At 22, he now ranks behind only Nakata in the pantheon of his country's footballers, unable to walk down a Japanese street unmolested.

Feyenoord's fans sing his name to the beat of 2 Unlimited's "No Limit" and at the away leg of the semi-final against Inter in the San Siro, they even displayed a banner with his name in Japanese letters.

Sadly, they had forgotten one sign in the name "Shinji". The player laughs: "Instead of Japanese, it was now Chinese."

Many Japanese now expect him to win the World Cup for them. "It's not realistic, but nobody in Japan cares about that," Ono confessed to a Dutch newspaper this week.

"So much pressure is put on me, it's hard to explain. But sometimes it gives me a stomach ache. Really! The only thing I want to do then is sleep. That's my biggest hobby and my escape in those situations."

Ironically, Feyenoord have yet to sell many Ono shirts in Japan.

onefootball
 

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Giant Robot said:
Speaking of Japan's problems at the Forward position, isn't Naohiro Takahara possibly an absence from this year's World Cup? I heard that he is in the hospital and having some breathing problems. Although he struggled at Boca Juniors, he is still capable of getting the strikes that count.
Hey GIantRobot. I am surprised to see you here! I didnt see you on BigSoccer for a long time.

Takahara is now considered off the team, according to Troussier. Some people are worrying about this, but I dont think it is a big deal. Look at the past history of Japan's scoring, and you will see that Takahara and Nishizawa do not have much productivity. Yes, they scored a lot of goals at the Asian cup, but look at the teams they faced. Almost half of Nishizawa's NT goals were scored in one match, against Uzbekistan!

Ofthe two, I think Takahara will be missed more than Nishizawa, but Suzuki, Yanagisawa, Kubo and even Gon Nakayama are all good enough. Japan's attack is almost 90% created from the midfield anyway.

One more thing to remember is, Yanagisawa has a tendency to get into goal slumps, but he always has his best performance in the highest pressure matches. In that sense, maybe its good that he is in a slump right now. If he breaks out of it just when the WC starts, I dont think anybody will miss Takahara.
 

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Shinji Ono, the first Japanese player to win a European Cup:)
 
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