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Saddly, this may be a bittersweet day for Corinthians fans.

CK8wR_4ET1Y
 

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XT's Demi-God
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RIP
 

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One of the most creative midfielders I have ever seen and one of the players that made me become a lifetime fan of Brazil national team back in 1982. Rest in peace, doctor. :depress:
 

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RIP Alton Ellis
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Rest in peace Great Man. The Guardian say the following:

At a time when most people were still afraid to speak out against the regime, he politicised football in a way no other player has even attempted, before or since. And he was as proud of his team's valiant contribution in helping dismantle the dictatorship as he was his considerable football achievements. At the end of 1982, Corinthians won the São Paulo state championship with "Democracia" printed on the back of their black shirts. Sócrates said it was "perhaps the most perfect moment I ever lived. And I'm sure it was for 95% of [my teammates] too".

• Sócrates (Sócrates Brasileiro Sampaio de Souza Vieira de Oliveira), footballer, born 19 February 1954; died 4 December 2011
 

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Cachorro
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We've lost a brilliant midfielder, a true leader among his peers, and a sharp observer of the world. This is a terrible loss not only to football fans but for all of us, because we don't have so many intelligent and restless minds that we can afford to lose a Socrates. Football has lost one of its most unique performers, and we can only hope that his example inspires many future generations to reach beyond the predictable.

Socrates may not have been the greatest athlete of his time, but his technical game had a refinement that most footballers can only aspire to. At a time when democratic principles had been trampled on and shouted down, Socrates had the vision and the balls to stand up for those principles. He was a deluxe model of that increasingly rare breed of player that thinks before hustling, and as such his example stands out not only for his peers but for all of us.

Rest in peace, Doctor. :(



[tub]pMyhaXkMcZc[/tub]
 

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We've lost a brilliant midfielder, a true leader among his peers, and a sharp observer of the world. This is a terrible loss not only to football fans but for all of us, because we don't have so many intelligent and restless minds that we can afford to lose a Socrates. Football has lost one of its most unique performers, and we can only hope that his example inspires many future generations to reach beyond the predictable.

Socrates may not have been the greatest athlete of his time, but his technical game had a refinement that most footballers can only aspire to. At a time when democratic principles had been trampled on and shouted down, Socrates had the vision and the balls to stand up for those principles. He was a deluxe model of that increasingly rare breed of player that thinks before hustling, and as such his example stands out not only for his peers but for all of us.

Rest in peace, Doctor. :(



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amazing post
 

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It's true that the first World Cup I have some vague memories of was Argentina 78 but my first real full on experience of a Mundial was Spain 82 and, from then on, I fell in love with Brazilian football. That midfield was an absolute work of art, and the mestre-sala of that samba school left us today.

Sócrates was unique. Even in that World Cup, when surrounded by superstars like Paulo Roberto Falcão, Toninho Cerezo or Zico, it was impossible to take the eyes off of that lanky funky cara. He was the best player of that World Cup and proved once again that football it's not just about winning.

Outside the pitch he was also a special character, not just because of his leadership role in the struggle for democracy in his country through football, but also due to his strong social commitment and for the clarity and intelligence with which he saw the game.

Obrigado Doutor, you were really one of the best.



 

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Honourable Mention, October 2011 Photo Contest
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Che que joven el tipo, una cagada...poos tenian la ONDA de Socrates, un Señor...
 

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Keyboard Hero
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I cried today over this...

GREAT MAN, GREAT PLAYER.

RIP
 

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Here's "Ser Campeão É Detalhe", an interesting film about Democracia Corinthiana, the democratic movement within Corinthians led by Sócrates (in Portuguese):

MNyRGt95cWw

 

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Here's a nice and short article I've just read on a Portuguese sports paper about Sócrates. I've translated it from Portuguese but for those that can read my language I've added a link to the original:


The life of Sócrates
by Daniel Oliveira in Record.pt, 10.12.2011
(Translated from Portuguese)

http://www.record.xl.pt/opiniao/cronistas/verde_na_bola/interior.aspx?content_id=730651

One episode molded his future: watching his father - who gave him an ambitious first name because he was reading Plato's "Republic", - burning his library. With the military coup of 64 a new dark age begun. He was one of the best players of his time. Nevertheless that is not the only reason why a myth was created around him. Nobody survives to one's own talent if, beyond it, one doesn't reveals a true character as a human being. When, in his hommage, the fans and the players of Corinthians raised their fists, recalling the very non-innocent way Sócrates had of celebrating his goals, they are paying a tribute to the Brazilian citizen, and not only to the footballer. A player that almost did not train as most of his time was dedicated to his Medicine studies.

With Wladimir, Casagrande and Zenon he built, between 1982 and 1984, the "Democracia Corinthiana" (Corinthian Democracy), a political movement during the Brazilian dictatorship. During a few years, Corinthians, who had a sociologist as football director by then, lived under a self-management system. They were the first club to have advertisements in their shirts. Political advertisement, of course. For democracy in Brazil. Sócrates got involved in civic and social struggles, directed theatre plays, wrote in political magazines and he was a doctor. With his money, he opened a clinic for athletes and common patients.

Let us look to history and to the career of Sócrates and let us compare it to that of the spoiled brats, with their fashionable haircuts, their colourful shoes, their image rights management, their commercials to banks, and we will understand the difference between a star and a hero. Some enter history because they have a gift. They live in the statistics and in the experts debates. Others stay in our colective memory because they did not pass through life as if the world would end at their feet.

 

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Cachorro
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Brilliant article, Filipe; thanks for sharing it.
Let us look to history and to the career of Sócrates and let us compare it to that of the spoiled brats, with their fashionable haircuts, their colourful shoes, their image rights management, their commercials to banks, and we will understand the difference between a star and a hero. Some enter history because they have a gift. They live in the statistics and in the experts debates. Others stay in our colective memory because they did not pass through life as if the world would end at their feet.
Quoted for truth!
 
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