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Discussion Starter #1
Don't be fooled by the dark. In this part of the world it's an open sauna even when the sun don't shine.

Last saturday a group of us guys aged teens to 40s went for our weekly game of footie at 19.30 (that's 7.30pm). The sun had just set, yet the heat was just eating us alive. Was about 38-40 Celsius, with over 70% humidity.

We kicked off, and played non-stop till about 20.10 when an argument broke out between the men, that these conditions are unacceptable, and unhealthy to play in. The ones that have lived in the Gulf for a long time were used to it. People like myself (even though I was still good to play on for another 20 minutes or so) aren't used to these kinds of conditions. And I was actually feeling quite dizzy.

Basically the arguments were: If u are a candidate for cardiac arrest, regardless of climate, u shouldn't be playing football.

Then, for those that are used to this weather or not, there is nothing unhealthy about playing in such conditions. It's just a matter of getting accustomed to it. The more moisture (H2O) there is in the air means the less Oxygen (O2) there is, hence it's more difficult to breath. Correct me if I'm wrong...

Our clothes were literally DRENCHED, as if we had soaked ourselves in water. U could squeeze our shirts and easily a cup of water would be filled!! :dazed:

Basically I'd like read more about sport and extreme weather conditions. I mean how come Bolivia usually win or draw in La Paz against the likes of Argentina and Brazil from time to time...it's because they are used to that climate, and the air pressure of high altitudes.

Any physios out there that can shed some light on the heat + humidity factor issue please?

Anyone else with similar experience please tell us about it here.

Thanks.
 

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hahah I hated playing football when I was in dubai, here in the us the weather is GREAT for soccer no humidity!!!

anyways I never got used to playing in the humidity you end up swimming in your own sweat wayy to soon
 

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Proud Juventino.
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try playing in egypt,, real disaster man :D

it's now 24 degrees but still, i can;t play football before 6 PM here.

anyway WHILE playing football , when taking a rest dont drink lots of water, it makes ur stomach go creepy and maybe barfing will follow, just 1 sip or something , tht's what the body needs.

and maybe be4 u play try drinking orange juice. :)
 

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I love playing in snow., Once in school competitions we playd in very big snow, and I scored 4 goals :proud: (hovever we lost 5:6 :wallbang:)
 

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Your stamina builds up after a while.

The key factors are:

1. Keep your neck cool or covered to avoid a heat stroke. You can use help from teammates not playing to provide water for splashing down your neck from time to time (sidelines) if it isn't covered. It is also a good idea to wet your hair and head to keep it cool.

2. Drinking plain water is helpful but drinking lemon squeezed juice is usually the way to go as it is more effective in re-hydrating you. Icy cold juice is not the best thing. Room temperature level is fine.

3. After the game, make sure to eat a couple of bananas because it is the most nutritious fruit in the world and often eaten by sportsmen.

4. After the game is over, take off that wet drenched shirt/jersey and dry your body so that it doesn't get that cool effect as the sweat dries out. That can damage the muscles.

5. Keep the warm-up to a reduced level than in cold conditions. You already sweat in such hot conditions so concentration has to be on the stretching exercises more than the warm-up in itself.

Other than that ... drink lots of liquid at half-time and post match. Follow these guidelines and it will work like a charm. ;)
 

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Jern Lizardhous said:
at least the English weather is good for something :D here the kids can play from 5am to 10pm at this time of the year. ;)
:howler: at anytime of the year we can play :)
i played football in Cyprus, not that bad :stress: :tongue:
 

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I live in Australia, our summer months effectively run from November to March. We have pre-season training that starts in January and for the first three weeks we do nothing but raining down at the beaches to get back to semi-playing fitness. The heat in urban Australia is not as harsh as it is in the Middle East (obviously), but I can recall being out there running along Christie's Beach when it was 43c, and I thought I was going to die.
 

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You're used to it, and I simply am not. I'm an Englishman and I don't handle heat well at all, 30c is too hot for me most of the time. We play our season in winter when it's below 10c most of the time, running in 43c weather is just wrong for most of us.

Only lunatics voluntarily go outside when it's over 40 degrees.
 

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When it starts to bake in Toronto, the smog takes over the city, if it doesn't, then the lack of an ozone layer burns us all to a crisp. the UV levels take a hike to the mountains and it becomes an oven. Worst tans ever. :D
 

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I was in Portugal for a week in May/June. Bought a football over there, played every day, doing kick ups and shooting in the tennis courts in the hotel. It was boiling but when I came back from there, I played football every day and when we had that heat wave I could play for 10am till 7pm easily, still play football all day now.
 

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khimik said:
You're used to it, and I simply am not. I'm an Englishman and I don't handle heat well at all, 30c is too hot for me most of the time. We play our season in winter when it's below 10c most of the time, running in 43c weather is just wrong for most of us.

Only lunatics voluntarily go outside when it's over 40 degrees.
same here

but i can play when it's over 40 degrees but ONLY at night.
 

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well in Dhaka its usually 35-38 C and humidity is always higher than 90 %. We still play footie at around 4 pm or 1600 hours upto 7pm.

I used to be able to do it upto 3 hours with little trouble. The fact is that if u keep doing that u get adjusted to it pretty quickly but if u break off for a while the thing is that it become nearly impossible to come back.

I remember after coming back from holidays i went to get a game and had to sit out half the match because my throat was so dry and i was feeling so dizzy. I nearly suffered heatstroke at that time.

Haroons tips are very useful. It also does to keep a icepack hand and just apply it to ur scalp if things get very nasty. but squeezed lemon juice with some salt is still the best rehydrant there is.
 

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in holland it always rains,so we dont have to worry :D
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I played 2 days ago at 19.00...except this time is was mini football on hard-court...roughly basketball-court dimensions.

I had trouble getting my head focused on the game, the moisture and the heat just ate me alive! And I've been playing since last May on a weekly basis, still can't get used to it. :(
 
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