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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi :)
I am sorry for starting an offtopic thread here but I do need your help… I have to do a research about English loan words in German advertisements (I mean ads in German language) for my uni and I need opinions of people who live in German speaking countries. Would you please answer the following four questions? It won’t take you much time but it’ll help me out a lot. Thanks in advance :)

1. Do you always understand the exact meaning of an English slogan or an English word in a German ad?

a) Yes
b) No

2. A slogan in which language do you think promotes the company in a better way?

a) German
b) English
c) Both equal

3. Should English slogans of foreign companies (like “Simply clever” for Škoda) be translated into German for German speaking market?

a) Yes, definitely.
b) Yes, but only possible word play doesn’t get lost.
c) No, they should remain English.

4. What do you think of advertisements that contain English words?

a) I can’t stand them, a German ad must only contain German words.
b) I’ve nothing against them unless there are too many English words in an ad.
c) I like them, English words make an ad more interesting and catching.
d) I don’t care.
 

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To make the off topic theme a little further off topic in the answer, hey, highly interesting to get these particular questions delivered by a girl/woman from Moscow.

Now, what you get here is a thrillingly unsignificant sample of just a few guys, but I remember I recently read an article on the topic a lot more scientifically proven, based on research. So maybe I can dig that out for you anytime soon.

For now, two versions. On the given options:

1a, 2c, 3b, 4d

With added options:

1a

2d, depends

3d, things like Škoda ad slogans should definitely be translated, as practically anybody with a german mother tongue in a Czech Republic bordering country would miss the meaning of what would be considered an authentic original, aka a slogan in Czech language. And a second hand foreign language like English for what is still (in a way) a Czech company would be just that, a second hand foreign language slogan without credibility. Maybe teenagers nowadays would see that differently, however. Say hallo to PISA....

4e, depends. Some of the English slogans in countries with other first languages just scream "cool, energetic, young" in a way which just embaresses the message. Others doesn't. Again, I hear some teenagers don't think so, as they are socialised differently. Studies show, at the same time they don't see the embarrassing shallowness of some screamin English slogans, the very same teenagers actually miss the meaning of quite many of english messages, going down again to say hallo to PISA facts, aka they simply don't have the education to understand. Sound and vision does it instead for them and that now starts to cross into another saying hallo, the say hallo to the success of downloading of ringtones....

In other words, meet your customer in your choice of slogan language, no overall rules available. The above mentioned study, as much as I remember, shows a decrease of the usage of English slogans in german speaking countries over the recent years.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alexx said:
To make the off topic theme a little further off topic in the answer, hey, highly interesting to get these particular questions delivered by a girl/woman from Moscow.
It's just that my diploma work is "English loan words in German ads" :)

Now, what you get here is a thrillingly unsignificant sample of just a few guys, but I remember I recently read an article on the topic a lot more scientifically proven, based on research. So maybe I can dig that out for you anytime soon.
still better than nothing :D and it would be great if you could find this article...
In other words, meet your customer in your choice of slogan language, no overall rules available. The above mentioned study, as much as I remember, shows a decrease of the usage of English slogans in german speaking countries over the recent years.
:relieved: good, at least my main idea is correct then :D

Thanks a lot for answering, both to you and MxPx :)
 
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