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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a quote from Arena's post-match press conference:

On what he has learned from the three games in the “Nike Road to Korea”:
“There are still a number of spots that are open. We got some really good performances from some guys this week, and we’re going to evaluate that before we decide what kind of lineup we go with against Portugal. I’m encouraged by the play of our 23-man roster.”

Hmmm...A number of spots are open? Interesting...
 

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So our boys have 18 days to heal, get fit, get more comfortable one another, and focus. The question every player had to ask himself after today's match was, could I play Wednesday? That's what they will have to do when they make the second round.

Maybe the Portugese will be thinking of pacing themselves, because they Know they are going on. Many a great team has been upset by a lesser opponent in the first round. Germany by Algeria in 82. Argentina by Camaroon in 90. The gap between the USA and Portugal isn't as great. So we have a shot.:tongue:

no matter how hard they try they cant stop us now.
 

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Oh, how I do hope that Regis' spot is one that is open and we get some 6'0 tall fast talented tough mature seasoned intelligent skillful player to take his place! Is that too much to ask?

Oldplayer
 

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Cherundolo makes the trip in replacement of the injured Armas.

;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
colocolo said:
Cherundolo makes the trip in replacement of the injured Armas.
Arena crumbled under relentless pressure from the short soccer players lobby. :tongue:
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Discussion Starter #8
Watching the World Cup in Washington Woes

From today's Washington Post:

Devoted Soccer Fans Face Choice: Kickoff or Sleep In
World Cup Watchers' Own Goal Will Be Staying Awake


By Manuel Roig-Franzia
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 20, 2002; Page B01


Every goal, every header, every yellow card must be seen live. This is the international soccer fan's credo. A little thing like a match starting in the middle of the night can't get in the way.

Sleep deprivation means nothing, not when a world championship is at stake. The World Cup is two weeks -- and 13 time zones -- away, but the plotting has begun in soccer klatches across the Washington region.

Absurdly late-night and ridiculously early morning get-togethers are being confected to catch broadcasts of the games from Korea and Japan, where the month-long World Cup kicks off May 31. Some have talked of setting up giant screens in basements and garages to accommodate crowds of friends. Others plan to plop televisions in their gardens, set out lawn chairs and watch games in the pre-dawn darkness.

They've been driven into their garages and gardens, in part because the District's Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration is refusing to let bars stay open past their 3 a.m. closing time, even if the owners promise not to sell alcohol after normal business hours.

Gail Lucas, a spokeswoman for the administration, said board members are concerned about burdening the police department and worried that neighborhoods will be disrupted by soccer fans congregating outside bars.

Soccer fans hate the ruling. They're trading gripes on the Internet and commiserating on the phone. After all, they've gotten used to slipping into satiny jerseys and hollering across the bar at fans rooting for the other team.

"It amazes me that while the city is trying to recover economically from September 11, that it would stand in the way of allowing these places to stay open," said David Sheon, a District public relations consultant and avid soccer fan.

The cruel geographical reality of the cup means that many matches won't start in the Washington region until 2:30 a.m. Others will start at 5 a.m.

Yet no one talks about recording the contests and watching them after a good night's sleep. Tape-delay is practically a dirty word.

"We have to watch them live," said Steve Atkins, polished British Embassy spokesman by day, weary soccer aficionado by night. "It would be just unbearable to know everybody in the U.K. was watching and already knew the score."

Outside the District, at least one bar -- Summer's in Arlington -- plans a round-the-clock World Cup marathon. Owner Joe Javidara has told his family to forget about seeing him, because he has booked a hotel room near the restaurant for the entire month of the cup. He and his managers will sleep there in shifts.

"If one works," Javidara said, "the other takes a nap."

Liverpool, England, native Angie Latham, a bookkeeper who lives nearby, has calibrated the trip to Summer's down to the minute. She and her husband will set an alarm to wake them from evening naps so they won't miss the 2:30 a.m. games.

She'll go to work at Salon XYZ on just a few hours' sleep. She won't take a "skive"(pronounced skyve), the British term for skipping work without permission. The British press has been rife these days with reports of workers taking skives to catch World Cup qualifying games.

But for some in the Washington area, missing work altogether and showing up a little -- or a lot -- late are entirely different things. Virginia Barreiro, 28, a Buenos Aires native, has already asked her boss at the World Resources Institute in the District for some compassion during the cup.

She calls it "alternative scheduling," a concept that her boss, a Brazilian with a yen for soccer himself, can readily understand.

But she'll most likely be setting her sights on parties at friends' houses.

Several soccer stalwarts across the area don't plan to stay open for the 2:30 and 5 a.m. games, even if they could. Among them: the Brazilian hangout, Green Field Churrascaria in Rockville, and the Portuguese favorite, Espresso in Manassas.

Mariano Arbaiza, the Salvadoran owner of the El Paso Cafe in Arlington, will catch the late games but not at his restaurant.

"I'll be watching," he said, "in bed."

Staff writer Yolanda Woodlee and special correspondent Christian Swezey contributed to this report.


Note: The Washington Post will run a list of establishments staying open all night in its World Cup special preview section May 31. To be included in the list, call 202-334-6074.

© 2002 The Washington Post Company
 

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Great post Hern,

I doubt if I can convince the sausage and grits breakfast joint (the "Homestead") here in nowhere land to stay open all night. I would for one month, and one month only, be willing to live in the DC area! Do you and OSF have a watering hole picked out, yet? And don't remind me that the Old Fart said he was sleeping first and watching video second. If I had his private number he wouldn't be!:) He'd better get a grip!:D

Oldplayer
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, OSF lives in Richmond and I live outside of DC so we won't be getting together for any of the WC matches (unless the U.S. gets to the finals! :howler: ).

Most likely I'm going to watch the match at home where I can suffer in private. I don't mean to sound pessimistic--dramatic victory is a kind of suffering too. I just hope I don't wake up the rest of the household with my cheers/cries of anguish.
 

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My schedule is really on the way for this WC, something that NEVER happened before to me....I get up @ 4:00AM during working days and Im already drivinn home at 2:15PM..Great hrs for the Cup in the American Continent or Europe , but not in the Orient..
Anyways I will make the best of the situation and I plan on watchinn as many LIVE games as possible..As it is..Monday the 10 of June is already on the agenda as a day Off/PTO ...So I can enjoy the match and later not worry about running-off to work ..

;)
 

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OSF will be sleeping while the matches are going on and watching the matches on video in the closed confines of his den as not to disterb the Status Quo at home while I will spend Sleepless nites and agonizing days trying to stay awake. Come the end of June I should be drained and by July I should be sleeping alongside the Dog in the Yard. :D


Great post Hern by the way
 

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Money is no object! :angel:

Still!

The U.S. World Cup soccer team has added monetary incentive. They will receive less than in 1998 if they lose their first three games, as they did in France. But they will earn a substantial amount more if they advance to the second round. In 1998, the players would have collectively received $1 million for advancing. They'd earn $1.85 million now. The structure of the U.S. Soccer Federation's deal with the players from 1998 has changed, largely because the federation didn't want to reward mediocrity. The team also would receive $100,000 for each point earned (three points for a win, one for a tie). If the Americans win the World Cup, each player would take home about $531,500, up from $414,000.

What's the chance of that! :D

It may be easier to hit the Power Ball! :dielaugh:
 

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I have a feeling we are not going to know who will start untill the day of our first match. Arena has been tight lipped about it so far, and it is nice to know he has a squad that can actually preform no matter who he puts in.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
In today's Washington Post Arena said that he doesn't plan to adhere to the June 1 deadline for announcing a lineup. He said he just threw the date out there to get the media off his back.

I hope he doesn't pull a Sampson and totally juggle the lineup right before the WC.
 

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Style strikeout: U.S. players ribbed for fashion shoot

May 27, 2002


SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- The U.S. soccer team is hoping that clothes don't make the man.

Players chuckled and turned a little red Monday as they ribbed each other over a fashion shoot that appeared in Sunday's style section of The New York Times Magazine.

After seeing Pablo Mastroeni in a turquoise-studded white linen shirt and matching pants by Roberto Cavalli, and others dolled up with come-hither looks on their faces, players thought the shoot deserved a red card.

``I think we're going to get a whole new fan base for our next games in New York and San Francisco,'' Kasey Keller said Monday.

Fellow goalkeeper Tony Meola yelled from a few feet away: ``Isn't he pretty?''

The Boys of Soccer shoot by Matthias Vriens featured Keller in Calvin Klein athletic wear, Brian McBride in Prada, Landon Donovan in Tom Ford for Yves Saint Laurent, DaMarcus Beasley in Jil Sander, Clint Mathis in Gucci and Cobi Jones in Miu Miu. Another shot in the magazine had a bare-chested Mathis.

``Everybody's laughing about it,'' McBride said. ``If you can't laugh about it, you have severe problems.''

The U.S. Soccer Federation said it pitched various promotional ideas heading into the World Cup. The pictures were taken about a month ago, and players expected more traditional shots.

``I thought we were going to get suits,'' said McBride, adding ``all the clothes were not perfect fitting.''

:cap:
 

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I 've seen the NYTimes Mag pictures. Geez, they look like a bunch of girlie boys. We've been fighting the 'sissy game in silk shorts' talk for decades, and now this.

They should have modelled for a Cabella's ad. Rugged outdoorsmenwear and such.

My son's girlfriend thinks they're hot.
 
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