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Yeah shit weather though. I feel that's a bit of an unfair stereotype about England -- it's not great but it rains more and it's consistently darker in other that don't get a bad rep, but when I've been up there it's really been quite bad.

The public drunkenness at closing time is some of the most memorable things I've experienced too.

As for the football team, for me the obvious soft spot is because Solano was there and he was a legend for my local team in Peru, but I imagine also for a generation it's the fact they were pretty great during the first decade or so of EPL after the rebranding, first almost getting that title and then often competing for European qualification. Also Shearer and Robson were probably among the most respected names from English football in the world, just when the league really started to challenge Spain and Italy with global audiences.
 
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Yeah, the weather...didn't enjoy winter very much, not that it was too cold but the wind was annoying.

The public drunkenness didn't surprise me too much...I guess it's because I was in university at the time and it's just natural to get smashed, lol. Good times. 😆
 

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I mean I got drunk at uni all the time too (and not only then lol), but we usually stayed very late and not all places closed at the same time and relatively early as they do in the UK, the pubs at least. And many young Brits seem to have have a quite peculiar relationship with alcohol -- I feel a larger percentage than in other places get not drunk but absolutely shit faced. And I felt in Newcastle the size of the city and density of the party made everybody converge. The combination of all this I felt created a quite impressive landscape. Then again, it's true I was older when I experienced it.
 

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I've spent a weekend in Newcastle and the weather was indeed horrible and people were friendly and sometimes I even understood what they were saying.
 

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I mean I got drunk at uni all the time too (and not only then lol), but we usually stayed very late and not all places closed at the same time and relatively early as they do in the UK, the pubs at least. And many young Brits seem to have have a quite peculiar relationship with alcohol -- I feel a larger percentage than in other places get not drunk but absolutely shit faced. And I felt in Newcastle the size of the city and density of the party made everybody converge. The combination of all this I felt created a quite impressive landscape. Then again, it's true I was older when I experienced it.
Yeah, you're right...there is this relationship with alcohol, lol. I was there 2 decades ago and the pubs closed at 11 pm on most days, which means the next stop would be the clubs. But these all closed at something like 2 am on most days, so after that, the party continues in someone's house or room. And yeah, since the goal isn't to get drunk but super drunk, you'll see a lot of this kind of behaviour out at the same time. The late night chippies and kebab shops are really popular upon closing...good luck counting five people who can stand straight, lol. While I prefer clubs closing later than 2 am like many do here (Singapore), the fun vibes from nights out in England are pretty special. Over here, having a good night depends on you and your friends "curating" it in the right way (who you're meeting up with, the specific destinations, etc. In places like Newcastle and even London, you can just leave it and things will fall into place, lol.

As a student, it's just part of life and you won't really mind it especially if you like to party yourself. But I get how it can be annoying, especially if you're older. At the end of each year, when it was crunch time for exams, and you can hear this stuff from your room...well it can be disruptive. At the same time, I'd tell myself that right after my last exam, I'm heading out with my buds to have the time of our lives. 😆
 
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Australia has a bad relationship with alcohol as it is, but the Brits who come here to work for 5-10 years in their 20s and 30s are by far and away the worst.

You can talk to a 20-something British girl here and her idea of an amazing night out would be;
1. The group gathers at a friends house and gets drunk. They might eat something, but are more likely to snort something.
2. They head to XYZ bar or pub later in the night
3. They go from drunk to absolutely 'shit faced'
4. They go to the bathroom together and at least one of them vomits violently
5. They have deep and meaningful conversations in the bathroom whilst holding their vomiting friends face out of the toilet by her hair
6. The vomiting friend comes back to her senses and thanks the friend/s who prevented her diving head first into the toilet bowl
7. They cry together and exclaim how much they love each other
8. They continue their night, looking like clowns as their make-up has run
9. They eventually head home telling each other how much they love each other, usually over a kebab or McDonalds
10. They tell everyone the next day how they had the most amazing night out EVER and plan to do it again soon
 

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A new villain for football fans.
A working-class game owned by billionaires. Why can't these fvkcers stick to golf, or whatever plutocrats play, and let the beautiful game to the people...

#fanownership
 
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A working-class game owned by billionaires. Why can't these fvkcers stick to golf, or whatever plutocrats play, and let the beautiful game to the people...

#fanownership
A co-op, like Real Madrid

Dunno about working class game though. The early development took place in British public schools (Rugby, Harrow etc)
 

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Pretty much all traditional sports were invented by young gentlemen because who else had enough leisure time and money to do stuff like this back then?

But it was a working class game by early 20th century, much like baseball in America (which originally was also a game of rich college students).
 

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Even more important than a club's structure merely being shifted from a billionaire owned team to an association with fan members, the fan-base needs to see themselves as active participants and not merely consumers. This mentality is best observed in Germany, where not only majority fan-ownership is the norm, but the active role of fans made Bundesliga the league with the highest average attendance in the world (at least before the pandemic). And supporters consistently pressure their club's leadership. Real Madrid is an example with no such culture.

Moreover, there's always loopholes like in the case of Leipzig, who have only 21 members (all Red Bull employees) while the 2nd smallest club by membership has over 10,000. So even if Leipzig technically respects the fan-ownership rule, in practice it's like any club with major shareholders. So the community spirit with emphasis on participation is mandatory to even begin breaking away from the profit-driven model which has been ruining football.
 

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Australia has a bad relationship with alcohol as it is, but the Brits who come here to work for 5-10 years in their 20s and 30s are by far and away the worst.

You can talk to a 20-something British girl here and her idea of an amazing night out would be;
1. The group gathers at a friends house and gets drunk. They might eat something, but are more likely to snort something.
2. They head to XYZ bar or pub later in the night
3. They go from drunk to absolutely 'shit faced'
4. They go to the bathroom together and at least one of them vomits violently
5. They have deep and meaningful conversations in the bathroom whilst holding their vomiting friends face out of the toilet by her hair
6. The vomiting friend comes back to her senses and thanks the friend/s who prevented her diving head first into the toilet bowl
7. They cry together and exclaim how much they love each other
8. They continue their night, looking like clowns as their make-up has run
9. They eventually head home telling each other how much they love each other, usually over a kebab or McDonalds
10. They tell everyone the next day how they had the most amazing night out EVER and plan to do it again soon
This is sounds exactly like the night-life in Romania years ago. Now there's not a drop of make-up running. Everyone "dances" like they have a baseball bat shoved up their arse, long-drink in hand, and scarcely a smile to be seen.
 
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You say that like you're disappointed.

It is a fine line with alcohol, and best that line isn't crossed.
 

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You say that like you're disappointed.

It is a fine line with alcohol, and best that line isn't crossed.
He was just using your post as a segue to rant about current dance styles, drink selections...and facial dispositions.

He's got a point about some of the newer dance styles...and facial expressions during said dance styles. Strikes me as very "old timey", like something that's maybe just after the jitterbug era. If you did this stuff in the 80's or 90's, people would think you're full on clowning.
 
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I don't mind people getting smashed and I'm not stranger to it myself, though less and less often as I get older. What surprised me in the UK was the scale of it. Everybody looked like they had their worst drunk night ever., and the closing times made everybody get out at the same time. You literally had to the bodies on the ground in the street.
 

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They're just out to have fun and, as youngsters, they're just not as conscious about themselves and the external world. And you can get away with that when you're young. Singing, laughing, whatever. And it's par for the course for university cities and towns.

Reminds me of one time we had a really big night during uni...I misplaced my phone (no idea where, thanks to the alcohol). One of my best mates picked it up, recognising it was mine. And he turned it off to save the battery. While he was walking back to his home, he started calling my phone - yes, the same one he had with him and that he'd just turned off - and left voice messages to say he had my phone and to ask why I wasn't picking up! When we all met up the next day, he returned it sheepishly, telling me I shouldn't listen to the messages, lol.
 

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You say that like you're disappointed.

It is a fine line with alcohol, and best that line isn't crossed.
Some parts I miss. Everyone moving lightly from side to side, back-straight, with killer/diva look on their faces while straw-sipping from the long drink is a decline imo. But you're right if I think about how violence has dwindled. Aside from the better mentality, I remember back in high school how common having weapons was (some peeps even wore those ugly brass knuckles belt buckles because they escaped inspection). Now only mobsters bring them in the club and they mostly brawl against each other anyway.
 

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Some parts I miss. Everyone moving lightly from side to side, back-straight, with killer/diva look on their faces while straw-sipping from the long drink is a decline imo. But you're right if I think about how violence has dwindled. Aside from the better mentality, I remember back in high school how common having weapons was (some peeps even wore those ugly brass knuckles belt buckles because they escaped inspection). Now only mobsters bring them in the club and they mostly brawl against each other anyway.
Did they dance like this?

 

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Btw, that guy was one of my sister’s students in elementary school.....don’t blame her though lol...she was a fantastic teacher.
 
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