Xtratime Community banner

61 - 80 of 101 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65,890 Posts
Sarma I'm reading Bridge on the Drina and can you explain why Andric refers to Bosnian-Muslims as Turks early on then Muslims in the second half of the book?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,137 Posts
Sarma I'm reading Bridge on the Drina and can you explain why Andric refers to Bosnian-Muslims as Turks early on then Muslims in the second half of the book?
The Balkans will always present an enduring struggle of identity vs. tolerance vs. low-grade acceptance/accommodation.

Though not absolute:
Turk = bad identity
Muslim = tolerance
(Janissary = accommodation/acceptance, albeit forced)

Classic WWE example is my relationship with Ante. Never liked him, i thought he was a neo-ustasa interloper in WWE. But as time went on, his humanity and mine was revealed. Now he's Ante, a Croat -- rather humourous, entertaining, mostly tolerable, and I've accepted his presence.
 

·
1st Tier Poster
Joined
·
49,263 Posts
Sarma I'm reading Bridge on the Drina and can you explain why Andric refers to Bosnian-Muslims as Turks early on then Muslims in the second half of the book?
#EEeducation

Imagine some Midwestern Bruce or Taylor whose forefathers sailed on the Mayflower trying to read this book. They wouldn't get past the first page unless it's in audiobook form and read by Morgan Freeman. Then they might manage a chapter or two while driving their Tesla to Whole Foods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65,890 Posts
The Balkans will always present an enduring struggle of identity vs. tolerance vs. low-grade acceptance/accommodation.

Though not absolute:
Turk = bad identity
Muslim = tolerance
(Janissary = accommodation/acceptance, albeit forced)

Classic WWE example is my relationship with Ante. Never liked him, i thought he was a neo-ustasa interloper in WWE. But as time went on, his humanity and mine was revealed. Now he's Ante, a Croat -- rather humourous, entertaining, mostly tolerable, and I've accepted his presence.
So because they were recent converts in the beginning of the book he portrays them in a negative light while later on he views them as sincere?
 

·
Ilie Balaci ❤
Joined
·
10,897 Posts
Crazy to think that the Romanian league was ranked 7th in the UEFA coefficient in 2007 and 2008 lol..
 

·
Ilie Balaci ❤
Joined
·
10,897 Posts
I remember Cluj and Dinamo were decent for a season or two,. Didn't Cluj get a cash injection around that time period?
yeah and also Steaua and Rapid playing each other in a UEFA Cup QF helped (Steaua should have made the final too), plus tiny Unirea Urziceni and CFR had some great results in CL around those times too, and Vaslui drew with Inter

Not sure about cash injections, but maybe.. I think with CFR the biggest thing was smart management and scouting, signing very decent African, South American, Portuguese players for cheap. Alvaro Pereira, Lacina Traore, Luis Alberto (scored a screamer against Man Utd at OT), Dubarbier, Culio, Cadu, Beto, etc come to mind.

Funny thing is Steaua's owner has way more money but is a lunatic and hasn't invested properly since 2012 when they had a good generation and a solid coach & fitness trainer. They knocked out Ajax from EL that year and then beat Chelsea in the first leg of the next round.

About Dinamo, I remember they destroyed Everton 5-1 in 2005 lol
 

·
Ilie Balaci ❤
Joined
·
10,897 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,137 Posts
So because they were recent converts in the beginning of the book he portrays them in a negative light while later on he views them as sincere?
The bridge represents time, permanence, and perhaps civility/conciliation. The river represents change. Together, they're also symbols of external forces that have (and continue) to impose division on a simple, and rather, insignificant people.

It's a mistake to say Andric "portrayed them in a negative light" in a sincere vs insincere theme. Instead, try reading it from a colonised voice or as a person treated as a possession. Maybe your idea of sincerity is the moments of lucidity townspeople have towards their forced (and unchanging) external divisions?

I'm not sure where you are with the book without giving up too much, and it's been a long time since I've read it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,137 Posts
Amazingly it has been translated into Estonian too, maybe I should give it try.
I'd be interested. After all, the best Dostoevsky translations-to-English come from a Latvian fella, Ignat Avsey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65,890 Posts
The bridge represents time, permanence, and perhaps civility/conciliation. The river represents change. Together, they're also symbols of external forces that have (and continue) to impose division on a simple, and rather, insignificant people.

It's a mistake to say Andric "portrayed them in a negative light" in a sincere vs insincere theme. Instead, try reading it from a colonised voice or as a person treated as a possession. Maybe your idea of sincerity is the moments of lucidity townspeople have towards their forced (and unchanging) external divisions?

I'm not sure where you are with the book without giving up too much, and it's been a long time since I've read it.
I have 8 pages left, this is my second book of his. Other one was The Damned Yard.
 
61 - 80 of 101 Posts
Top