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Maccabi Haifa's Gustavo Boccoli was denied citizenship, the midfielder learned yesterday. The Brazilian player, who filed for citizenship to be able to play for Israel's national soccer team, was informed by the Interior Ministry's population registry that he failed to meet the criteria for full citizenship and will have to wait another two years. He currently holds a national ID card as a temporary resident. (Moshe Harush)

Source: Haaretz.com
 

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Maccabi Haifa's Gustavo Boccoli was denied citizenship, the midfielder learned yesterday. The Brazilian player, who filed for citizenship to be able to play for Israel's national soccer team, was informed by the Interior Ministry's population registry that he failed to meet the criteria for full citizenship and will have to wait another two years. He currently holds a national ID card as a temporary resident. (Moshe Harush)

Source: Haaretz.com
he will earn his citizenship, don´t worry. It will be just like Giovanni Rosso, the same story and the same time. Both of them applied when they were in good form and received when they were near of ending their careers. At least the Interior Ministry has some criteria.
 

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As good as it may be for the NT if he had gotten the citizenship, but in a way I am happy the ministry uses the same criteria for anyone. Dont forget that there are many people who would love to move to Israel and face very harsh criteria to get the necessary permits (I speak from experience :(). Now I dont complain about this, after all every country has some laws about this and no country has the door open to anyone. But consequence is needed, lack of consequence is frustrating. I mean, imagine you give the citizenship to someone purely because he is a celebrity or famous person, can you imagine this is very frustrating for the many people who would love to live in Israel but face the restrictions? I am not complaining about the restrictions as like I said, the governments of every country use some criteria before granting permits and such, I do applaud that the Israeli ministry makes no exceptions for famous people and apply the same rules to anyone. If they didnt do it it would be unfair, because why does a football player deserve a better treatment than an equally hard working but non-famous construction worker?? The same rules have to be applied for anyone, so I think the Knesset does the right thing here.



PS: he can always bypass the rules by converting to Judaism and using the Aliyah laws to get automatic citizenship (which IMO is however abusing a law and unfair to the Jewish people ... As much hassle as it is to get the working permits, I think for non-jews who love Israel the only honest thing to do is to apply for the permits without using lies to bypass laws. In the end, if you keep trying you will get there, in an honest way. Hopefully ... Converting in itself is OK, but not if the only motivation would be to get a passport)
 

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As good as it may be for the NT if he had gotten the citizenship, but in a way I am happy the ministry uses the same criteria for anyone. Dont forget that there are many people who would love to move to Israel and face very harsh criteria to get the necessary permits (I speak from experience :(). Now I dont complain about this, after all every country has some laws about this and no country has the door open to anyone. But consequence is needed, lack of consequence is frustrating. I mean, imagine you give the citizenship to someone purely because he is a celebrity or famous person, can you imagine this is very frustrating for the many people who would love to live in Israel but face the restrictions? I am not complaining about the restrictions as like I said, the governments of every country use some criteria before granting permits and such, I do applaud that the Israeli ministry makes no exceptions for famous people and apply the same rules to anyone. If they didnt do it it would be unfair, because why does a football player deserve a better treatment than an equally hard working but non-famous construction worker?? The same rules have to be applied for anyone, so I think the Knesset does the right thing here.



PS: he can always bypass the rules by converting to Judaism and using the Aliyah laws to get automatic citizenship (which IMO is however abusing a law and unfair to the Jewish people ... As much hassle as it is to get the working permits, I think for non-jews who love Israel the only honest thing to do is to apply for the permits without using lies to bypass laws. In the end, if you keep trying you will get there, in an honest way. Hopefully ... Converting in itself is OK, but not if the only motivation would be to get a passport)
Yes, definitely the cirteria used was fair. It is not because he is a famous player he would receive citinzenship before others. Giovanni Rosso who was much more popular than Boccoli among the Israeli public received his only after 10 years!!
He always declared he loved Israel and the same goes with Boccoli and this admirable, always good to see someone speak well from your people and country and they deserve it. (Hope not only for intrests).
Other player that no one speaks much about, but has played amost all his career in the country is Murad Megamedov who applied some years ago.
Collauti married to an Israel girld and consequently earned his citizenship in a very short period.
 

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If anyone knows a nice Israeli girl for me: send me PM with her pic and her email address. :heart: :drool:

On a serious note, I believe the criteria is 3 year in the country and then you can apply for citizenship? Which is very generous compared to some other countries: Turkey 7 years (unless marriage, then it is only 3 years), USA 5 years (unless marriage, then it is 2 or 3 years I believe), UK 5 years, Spain 10 years, ... So I wouldn't say the Israeli system is unfair, the only tricky thing is to get in in the first place since most employers prefer a jew who can use the Aliyah law rather than a Goy who needs an expensive working permit (understandable from their point of view though so I won't complain, it is just a pity for those of us who are not Jewish but have a very sincere interest in living in Israel ...)
 
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