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Discussion Starter #1
There has been so many so which stand out to you?We all remember the infamous Kung-Fu kick from Eric cantona against a mad Crystal palace fan,David Beckham's brilliant goal from the halfway mark,the great battles between Liverpool and newcastle.
So tell all about your favourite moments it could be anything. :)
 

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- the unbeaten run;
- winning the league at Old Trafford;
- winning the league at White Hart Lane;
- 1998 double;
- any Henry wönder goal;
- the day we beat Norwich 5-1 ten years ago;
- any of Bergkamp's wönder goals;
- every time Man United lose.
 

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well Blackburn winning the title was ok as it had an big underdog come good style feel to it. other than that it's mostly a matter of enjoying the good goals and players for me since i don't really have a preference among the clubs there. :thumbsup:
 

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You know I don't wanna sound like a hater but I don't think David Beckham's goal can be classed as "brilliant". If that was brilliant, then what would you call Bergkamp's goal against Newcastle or Giggs' goal in the FA Cup? Anyway: unbeaten run, henry and bergkamp's stunners.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Matt Le Tissier's classy goals were something special :thmbup: ,Nwanku Kanu's hatrick vs Chelsea and Zola's brilliant back heel are also in the mix.
 

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Add to that -

Di Canios Sissor kick goal

and

Trevor Sinclairs overhead kick goal from outside the box - probably the best goal I have ever seen (cant rememer if it was scored in the Prem).
 

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J_Reyes#9 said:
You know I don't wanna sound like a hater but I don't think David Beckham's goal can be classed as "brilliant". If that was brilliant, then what would you call Bergkamp's goal against Newcastle or Giggs' goal in the FA Cup? Anyway: unbeaten run, henry and bergkamp's stunners.

Why is that Beckham's goal is not "brilliant'??.. It was voted the best EPL goal ever..
 

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Zola's backheel was vs norwich in one of the cups.

memorable for the wrong reasons and haunting in equal measure is david busst (sadly ironic) horrific leg break

 

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I forgot how nasty that was!!!
 

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yup just about, good article here

Busst upbeat despite broken dreams
By Rick Broadbent
How the former Coventry player has overcome his sickening injury nine years ago



IT WAS six months before David Busst could look at the photograph. Knowing his career was over, he decided to see what all the fuss had been about, why the game had been delayed for 15 minutes as blood was mopped from the turf and why Peter Schmeichel needed counselling. “It took my breath away,” he said. “It didn’t look natural.”
Football is littered with injuries, but few have provoked such an outpouring of revulsion and sympathy as the one when the former Coventry City defender broke his leg at Old Trafford, nine years ago today. It started a trawl through purgatory as the player had to endure 22 operations over a two-year period, contracted a hospital superbug and, with the infection eating away at his muscle, was told that he might have to have his leg amputated.



Failing to recognise David Beckham was the least of his worries. “After a while I’d go to a hotel, where my Mum was staying, just to get away from the hospital,” he said. “The receptionist rang up one day and said, ‘There’s a Manchester United fan here to see you.’ I said, ‘Send him up.’ This lad with long hair and a baseball cap came in and I asked him his name. ‘David Beckham,’ he said. That was embarrassing.”

At the age of 28, Busst knew instantly that his career hung in the balance. The doctors pulled no punches and the plethora of cards and letters — he ended up with 4,500, all logged and replied to — told him that this was no ordinary injury. “I was looking at my quality of life,” he said. “Would I be able to walk again? Would I lose my leg? I was having muscle removed from my back and put in my leg to create a blood supply, because I had a syndrome where my muscle exploded and there was no blood going to my foot. The infection was eating away at what was there and they had to keep cutting and cutting.”

They cut so much that he ended up with a foot-drop. Six months after the game, Busst knew that his playing days were over. He admits that there were dark nights in the aftermath. He was married with a daughter and needed to pay bills. A naturally positive outlook helped him, as did the way in which the much- maligned football community rallied round him. Sir Alex Ferguson visited him and Eric Cantona tried but was turned away by hospital staff.

Manchester United agreed to play a testimonial, while the likes of Ryan Giggs, Robbie Fowler, David Batty and Graeme Le Saux wrote to him. Now Busst does the same, penning notes to players who suffer bad breaks. “I tell them that if the bone did not come through the skin then there’s no problem,” he said. “That means there will be no problem with infection and it’s just a case of the bone mending. It can’t be nice to be compared to me when they know it finished me.”

He has a vivid memory of that afternoon. Coventry had won a corner and he went up for it as usual. Noel Whelan flicked it on and Busst darted to the back post. The ball bounced and his leg suddenly snapped. Schmeichel turned away in horror. Busst’s father and brother raced from their seats to the ambulance. Within minutes, his wife, Susan, began fielding calls at home, asking if she had heard.

“I had a sense that something wasn’t where it should be,” he said. “The shock set in. I was in agony until I went under the operation. The pain was unbearable. I also remember being in the back of the ambulance going over the speed bumps outside Old Trafford. Bang, bang, bang. There were loads of them. They told me straightaway that I had a compound fracture of the tibia and fibula, which is the worst fracture you can have. For me, it wasn’t playing professionally, it was the thought of not being able to kick a ball around the back garden with the kids.”

Nine years on and Busst is the director of Coventry’s Football in the Community scheme, as well as the manager of Evesham United in the Southern League. He has aspirations to move up the managerial ladder, but knows he has already climbed what once seemed an insurmountable obstacle. The anniversary of the sickening injury means nothing to him.

“I don’t go and get p***** on April 8,” he said. “Life goes on and I’m lucky. The last operation I had was risky. I only had two tendons left and I had them re-routed. It pulled my foot up. If it hadn’t taken I’d have had permanent foot-drop for the rest of my life. Now there’s nothing I can’t do. I don’t trip up and I can even play charity games. It took me five years.”

For a man who came to the game late and then had his time cut short, Busst is remarkably devoid of bitterness and hopes his case may help others in similar situations. “I was never a high-profile player so it’s nice to be remembered for something,” he said. “I even got name-checked on Hollyoaks the other day. And let’s be honest, if you’re going to break your leg then you might as well do it in front of 50,000 people at Old Trafford.”
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Quite a sad story I actually recall that and was very moved by the whole thing,I hadn't seen the picture until now and it is quite disturbing.
 

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Wow, that is quite noble. It was a sad moment for me when Cisse broke his leg, I was really scared for his career with it snapping like that, but he's back now and I got chills watching him play a few games the other day. You see real dedication and motivation for a player to be like that, to have that positive outlook and drive to push on from such a scary injury and be playing again in just six months.

As to more positive moments, if I had been a fan at the time of Bruce's equaliser six minutes into stoppage time, then I'm sure I would have never forgotten that.

The moment that will stand out of the games I've watched live is Bergkamp's goal versus Newcastle. Just...it still takes my breath away every time I see it. It's as good of skill as you'll see anywhere. No other words needed.
 

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I actually think his goal against Leicester in 1998 was better, and I do recall Wenger even saying his goal against Leicester was the best goal, technique wise, he's ever seen. Bergkamp's done that sort of goal a few times now, too.
 

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Isaac said:
The moment that will stand out of the games I've watched live is Bergkamp's goal versus Newcastle. Just...it still takes my breath away every time I see it. It's as good of skill as you'll see anywhere. No other words needed.
The funny thing is.... I actually scored a quite similar goal before (same control of the ball and the turn he took but I did it a little further away, got the ball and smashed in a volley) even though I am sooooooo bad on-the-ball... and my teammates didn't even bother applauding it :(

Did we just let a moment of magic go unrecorded and unnoticed? :frustrat:
 
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