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Discussion Starter #1
One has to believe that Donovan AKA Golden Boy has achieved this title by a shere marketing ploy with no basis. One I have to agree with.
Here is an article by an ESPN writer that sums up my beliefs as well.

No longer the great U.S. hope Jen Chang ESPN The definition of a conspiracy theory is a clandestine covert action that is not apparent at first glance. With this in mind, Donovan backers are out in full force to defend Landon Donovan's proposed move back to MLS with the L.A. Galaxy. (A move that would also result in the Galaxy shipping Carlos Ruiz to FC Dallas).
Rather than recognize that Donovan struggled mightily in his second stay in Germany, conspiracy theorists would have you believe from among the following creative masterpieces to name but a few:
a. That he extricated himself from Leverkusen's ownership to MLS in order to give himself total control over which European team he opts to go to next.
b. That his recent performance against Liverpool in the Champions League (which was dire, and that's being kind) was premeditated to further Leverkusen's disenchantment with him, and possibly save MLS money on any potential transfer fee.
c. That Donovan would have succeeded in Germany if he simply had a coach that believed in him and would have given the opportunity to do so, by playing him in his preferred forward spot.
These three theories -- and other such justifications -- are bunk, nonsense or whatever other suitable dismissive adjective one feels like throwing out there.
The fact is that it's becoming more and more clear to ardent fans of U.S. soccer that Donovan simply may not be cut out to be the golden boy that many had hoped that he would be.
Donovan has the technical skills and potential to be a world-class player, as he showed in the last World Cup. However his continuous failure to reach the heights demanded of such expectations since that time (not to mention his consistent inconsistency outside of a MLS setting) leads one to believe he is simply lacking the 'mojo' or unique intangible that sets apart the greats.
A large part of Donovan's problem seem to stem from his often-documented homesickness which affected both his stints in Germany. Donovan is the type of player who thrives on confidence (what player doesn't?) but at the same time is prone to losing it at the drop of a hat. When he's focused, Donovan can dominate a game with his creativity and willingness to run at defenders, but that's not the version we always see. In many games, it's possible to predict whether or not he'll play well based on his first few touches of the ball. A mistake here or there and it seems to put Donovan into a shell from which he rarely recovers.
During the Liverpool game - he actually looked liked he was hiding from the ball at times. It wouldn't be the first time Donovan's intangibles were questioned. Current German coach and former national team great Jurgen Klinsmann has also spoken in the past about Donovan's confidence issues. In a "/feature?id=255737&cc=5901" Klinsmann noted that Donovan lacked self-belief.
It's clear that Donovan's confidence is high only when playing in a familiar environment and at home among friends, family and girlfriend. The comfort zone of California is probably the single biggest reason Donovan is a totally different player in MLS, than he is in national team or European settings.
Herein lies another part of Donovan's problem - he appears content being a big fish in a little pond. He has often said that it wouldn't bother him if he never played another game in Europe. While there's nothing wrong with wanting to be be close to home, elite players usually have a strong desire to improve their skills against stiffer competition - which would more likely happen if he played overseas.
For a nation still looking for its first world-class superstar, Donovan's seeming lack of desire to leave any kind of global legacy speaks volumes about his capability of becoming the 'messiah' the U.S. needs.
As for whether or not he ever got a fair shake with Leverkusen, there's no doubt he could have been afforded more opportunities during his most recent stint, especially with Robson Ponte out. However, it's not as if the Leverkusen coach can be accused of not giving Donovan a chance - Donovan started Leverkusen's biggest game of the season against Liverpool but withered under the pressure. For Donovan critics, this latest wilt is another shining example of big games where he has failed to perform.
The most disturbing aspect of Donovan's return to MLS is that he is returning so soon after only just joining Leverkusen after the German winter break. Starting roles in any league are rarely handed out; they are earned. Donovan got chances at Leverksen, limited as they were, and he failed to make them count. But instead of staying, proving his doubters wrong and redeeming his reputation in Germany, he's now placed himself in a position to be called a quitter.
His shortcomings on the national team level are apparent as well. Against Mexico on Sunday he was listless and largely MIA. Even his one contribution to the game, the assist to Eddie Lewis on the lone U.S. goal, came after he made a hash of the initial entry pass from Eddie Johnson. For much of the game he looked tentative, scared and unwilling to run with the ball. He seemed to be almost as in love with the sideways or backwards amounting-to-nothing pass as Claudio Reyna.
After the game, Donovan was quoted as saying, "Coming in at the half the way we were playing, my main concern was let's make sure we don't get blown out''.
A loser mentality if ever there was one. Kick a chair, head butt the wall, do something, anything but lay down with a shockingly defeatist attitude in the face of a hardly insurmountable 2-0 deficit. If World Cup qualification wasn't enough of a motivation, the fact that small segments of the Mexican crowd were chanting, "Osama! Osama!" should have been enough to stir the patriotic flames inside Donovan -- but clearly they weren't.
One can't lay blame for the Mexico fiasco on Donovan's shoulders entirely, but as the star draw and the perceived marquee player, his failure to perform hurt the U.S. cause tremendously. He'll probably rebound against Guatemala but, he always does in games of lesser magnitude.
That's why it's strange that he's often been tagged the U.S. captain by Bruce Arena - a cynic could argue that this has always been a pure marketing move, as Donovan has yet to display any type of real leadership on the senior level. He's an excellent team player, a solid citizen and can be a potential match-winner in any game for the U.S., but is he really the type of player that can will his teammates to victory in the heat of a hostile environment in the time-honored tradition of players such as Roy Keane or Tony Adams?
Based on the performance against Mexico and his shortcomings in other big games, the evidence suggests otherwise. Granted he dominates MLS and yes he's a proven winner at the MLS level, but it's doubtful he will ever fill the bill as the flag-bearer for U.S. soccer for the next decade. It's time to take a closer look at a player like Eddie Johnson or even DaMarcus Beasley, who has proved so far at PSV this season that U.S. outfield players can indeed cut it at the highest levels of European soccer.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here is a Klingsman artice printed back in 2003. This is his take ion the 2002 WC as well as our young Donovan.

Klinsmann sounds off Marc Connolly ESPN.com When Jurgen Klinsmann talks soccer, it's impossible not to listen intently and write everything down he's saying, even if you don't agree with some of his statements.
After starring for Germany in three World Cups, including Italia '90 where the Germans triumphed, and accomplishing nearly every feat possible en route to becoming one of the world's all-time greatest players, everything he says has some merit.
Speaking to a group of soccer aficionados, many of which were English, and youth coaches from all over the U.S. at the NSCAA Convention in Kansas City last week, Klinsmann started off with a bang.
Asked whether Germany deserved to win its World Cup quarterfinal against the U.S., the lively striker said that he believed they did because they were smarter and wanted it more.
"I was at that game working the German broadcast," said Klinsmann of the epic 1-0 match this past June. "The U.S. played a great game - they had it in their hands. They were winning most of the one-on-one situations in the midfield."
Moments later he added, "But these are games decided by the mind, not the feet."
Case in point, Klinsmann felt that America's 20-year-old star Landon Donovan didn't find the back of the net on any of his dangerous runs because of his confidence level, not his timing or the fact that Germany's world-beating goalkeeper, Oliver Kahn, happened to make one of the saves of his life in the first half when Donovan nailed a hard lefty shot to the far post.
"He failed there because he didn't believe in himself," said Klinsmann.
And it wasn't just Donovan, according to the German legend.
"In Europe, we have sixty to seventy high-profile games each season," he said. "That makes a mental difference. You could see that some Americans did not have that competitive edge yet."
Ok, so maybe he didn't start out with any warm-and-fuzzies. But we asked for Klinsmann Unplugged, and that's what he provided for over an hour.
To the naked eye, he doesn't appear any different than he did at any point during his star-studded career, whether it was with the German National Team or with all the prestigious clubs in Europe's best leagues that he suited up for such as Inter Milan, Tottenham Hotspur and Bayern Munich.
Klinsmann still looks match-fit without an ounce of body fat on him. Talking about the game, the same lively eyes that always seemed to be pleading for the ball and that childlike grin reappear as he tells tales from what he calls his "journey" rather than a career.
One of his favorite stories is one that many staunch English Premier League followers in the room know well, but followed along as though they'd never heard it.
It occurred when Klinsmann came to Tottenham in 1994 from AS Monaco in France. By this time, he was already a renowned figure and considered one of the best goal scorers in the world, yet the English media kept making a fuss about his "diving" whenever a defender got his boot anywhere near the ball or his body.
Not understanding the tabloid culture or the way stars are equally built up and burned to the ground by the English press, Klinsmann was deeply hurt by this. He took it as an attack on both his playing ability, as well as his character.
His teammates and coaches talked to him about it and told him he'd have to get over it and either fess up to it or defend himself. Of course, defending himself would have made the situation worse, so he came up with a plan to get the media back on his side.
At a large press conference, Klinsmann faced his detractors, pulled out snorkel equipment, put it on, and asked, "Are there any good diving schools in London?"
Classic.
"From then on, I was accepted," said the "Golden Bomber".
His teammates got in the act before a game against Sheffield Wednesday, whose oh-too-clever fans showed up with signs that read "5.8" and "5.9"
"Teddy Sheringham said to me, When you score your first goal, we're all going to dive. Then it actually became popular with the kids, so for quite awhile every celebration was a dive."
Some of Klinsmann's best quotes came when he was asked about some of his famous teammates and opponents.
On creative players: "One player that I always admired was Maradona. To me, he was an artist on the field. Everything he did was full of creativity and full of fun."
On his boyhood hero and former coach Franz Beckenbauer: "He was always smiling and always in a good mood. He knew what every play needed."
On sometimes-nemesis and longtime teammate Lothar Mattheus: "He was a great captain. From a character point of view, we were very different. We had many arguments and didn't get along too much. But we had our biggest success of our careers together.
On Brazil's World Cup hero Ronaldo: "No one compared to Ronaldo four years ago. Now he appears to only go straight and for the finish. He's lost many skills."
On what Germany needs to win another World Cup: "We're missing players who can change the game around. We have a lack of creativity in our game now. It's a huge challenge."
On his best quality as a player: "I always felt we could win, even if we were down two goals in the ninetieth minute."
On why he stopped training with the L.A. Galaxy to stay in shape: "When I worked out with the Galaxy, it got to a point where they kept asking if I'd play another season or two."
One area that Klinsmann has many opinions on is youth development.
Residing in southern California with his American-born wife, Debbie, for the past four years and playing on an amateur side on Orange County, he has had ample opportunity to see the way American players are taught the game, especially now that his son is six years old and starting to play.
He thinks that having young players go from their recreation team to their club team to their ODP team to their school team is hindering their development as soccer players.
"At the end of the day, it really hurts the kids," he said. "They need consistency. They need to be a part of the same group. Kids are mixed all the time, and I think it is horrible."
This holds true as they get older as well, according to Klinsmann.
"College players play for three months, then they go to their club or the PDL, then pickup, then back to college," he said. "It's difficult to keep changing the environment."
One of the best messages he spoke of was how the difference between players in many other countries and the U.S. is in how much they play on their own away from the practice fields.
Klinsmann said that most of his skills were in place by the time he was 11 years old because of all the work he put in.
"Soccer, in my opinion, is self-teaching," he said. "The more you play, the better you get. You don't see kids play in the park these days. It's only in an organized environment. We are starting to have that similar problem in Europe, as well. Certain things are not teachable. I kicked the ball around three to four hours a day."
Despite what it seems, Klinsmann's tone isn't one of a Euro-snob. In fact, he states right off the bat that the U.S. is "no longer the underdog - they are to be taken very seriously."
He also makes a point of saying how he's met several coaches on the West Coast who know as much, if not more, about the game as their peers in Europe.
However, I wasn't about to let him leave without backing up to talk about Donovan's supposed "lack of confidence," which seems quite far-fetched. After all, we're talking about someone who scored two goals in the World Cup, had another one scored an own goal against Portugal, and even had another called back against Poland. All at the age of 20, too.
Klinsmann's response: "He has plenty of talent, football-wise. But not going to Germany (to play for Bayer Leverkusen) is a sign to me perhaps he's not ready to make the next step."
Ouch.
Donovan will surely have an ample opportunity to show up Klinsmann and any remaining German naysayers in 2006 when the World Cup returns to Deutschland
 

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The one area in which Donovan really does have World Class skills is in his ability to come up with excuses. He has an excuse for every little problem he has encountered while trying to reach the top, which is why I highly doubt that he will ever amount to much outside of the U.S. Whether it is "hostile" opponents, the "hostile" Leverkusen staff, or the "hostile" German culture, he thinks he has the answer to every little accident, screw-up, and let-down, though with all the crying and whining it is getting just too obvious that he is full of it. Too bad that someone gifted with such skills is also dogged by such insecurities and lack of character, because, as someone once said, the day you start taking responsibility and stop making excuses is the day you are destined for greatness, and with his current attitude and lack of fortitude it seems that this will unfortunately never happen for Donovan.
 

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thank god da US has better talented playas with major grapefruits! :thumbsup:
Adu will take his spotlite! :thumbsup:
he is a da prima donna....every country has 1 , that is ok :thmbdown:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lets face it Donovan grew up a Mommys boy. Not having a father around to guide him, and kick him in the A$$ when he failed hurt. I know not all kids become Momma boys when they grow up in a single family household with no father image but they do tend to go one way or the other. And Donovan cant sever the skirt strings. We know he has talent yet the wrong head for a great player. We should accept that he is just that a talented player and just that. The parks all over the world are full of them> I guess our main reason for dissapointment in him is the Image that the USSF gave him as the "Golden Boy" In their desperate attempt to find an American Soccer Folk Hero. They needed someone to lead the US youth as a Soccer Hero, and they all new about the flaw in his character, but were they so blinded by his skill and hope that he would grow out of it, or was it just an attempt to breathe new life into the sport?

Now lets move on to the Next Golden Boy in Adu. He does have very simular roots as Donovan, and he is back in DC, I guess time will tell if Adu will become the "New Golden Boy" or Just the next " Momma's Boy".
 

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I agree that he is a little mommas boy. I used to like him, and after this last stint in Germany, and his stupid interviews I have seen, he is a huge disappointment. I have no repect for this guy.
 

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Donovan is a joke. I don't care what he does with his life now.
 

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He is not a soccer player....
 

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Nope, he's a pu$sy! I hate Donovan. As I listed in my old articulo. No me gusta Donovan porque el no tiene pasion por juege futbol. En todos de los Estados Unidos, jugadores quieren jugar futbol en europa por un club grande y por los Estados Unidos. Donovan no tiene pasion por juego en todo de los Estados Unidos excepto en California. El es un "Primador" no un grande jugador de futbol.
 

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He's shown time and time again why he's an inmature momma's boy. Arena should drop him from the NT.
 

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I hope Arena drops him as well. Piece of shit player.
 

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agreed....So is eskandarian in the main rotation for the USNT yet? He is a good player, though he was clearly outmatched vs. pumas.
 
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