Xtratime Community banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,551 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a question I've thought about for a long time, something that I've always been extremely curious about. I've thought about it off and on for over a year now, but it was when I was watching the EPL Preview show on Friday that I realised I could post a thread here to see what you thought.

Do you think that a completely deaf person could play football? I realise that football is not played with the ears, but yet I've never heard of someone who could not hear being a professional football. I've heard of a man with one arm being recruited by third division Romanian teams, but never of a deaf person playing football.

So that's my question, could someone play top-flight professional football if they were completely deaf? I know that these people usually have other defects, but if their whole body worked completely functionally but for their ears not working, could they play for, say, a Premiership side?
 

·
1st Tier Poster
Joined
·
51,534 Posts
That would be quite difficult when he can't hear what his teammates and manager are yelling him, also he can't hear ref's whistle. Also the overall communication in training and locker room would be extremely difficult. I don't think it would be possible for a deaf person to play at the top level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,608 Posts
If Maradona were deaf, I'm sure he would still have fared pretty well in a top league. That's what I think anyway.. but good topic brought up here..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,768 Posts
Its rumoured that Isiah Eliakwu (Inter owned player) is deaf, I heard this is one of the reasons Parma sent him back to us and chose Zicu as part of the Adriano deal.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,551 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Andy Christ said:
That would be quite difficult when he can't hear what his teammates and manager are yelling him, also he can't hear ref's whistle. Also the overall communication in training and locker room would be extremely difficult.
I thought about both of these before posting, but I thought that both could be overcome. First off, in many higher level football teams foreign players won't be able to communicate with other players, on or off the pitch. This is what made me think of this question. Papa Boupa Diop speaks no English whatsoever so he spoke about how hard it had been at times within the locker room, and at times on the pitch, but he's shone of late, with four goals in eight games. He hears what others say to him, but it none of it registers, so he might as well be deaf.

Also, as good as Cisse is, he doesn't talk on the football pitch. I read an article about it before he broke his leg, about how he doesn't speak on the football pitch, he just speaks with his football.

As to the whistle thing, yeah that would be hard but I think he'd eventually develop as sense of when there was to be a foul or something of the sort. He'd have to be more alert, definately, but you see players playing through a whistle now, so I think he'd just do the same. Plus, the referee makes arm signals so he'd have to look at the referee on many occasions.

I believe it would be possible for a very gifted deaf person to play professional football.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
30,934 Posts
Of course he can. Garrincha is a living proof that deficiences are meant to be overcome and not to make someone go away. Of course, the clubs today would probally reject this kid but then they would reject Garrincha as well. They are of course wrong.
 

·
World Class Player
Joined
·
7,673 Posts
:) Indeed, his hearing was pretty bad. In 1939, he failed his Army hearing test, which was designed so that pretty much anyone that could associate gunfire to direction could get into the forces. Despite (or maybe because of) this, and a serious knee ligament problem, he became one of the best players of all time.

However, he was not entirely deaf, nor was his deafness a life-long affliction; his hearing simply deteriorated over time. I cannot imagine someone that was entirely deaf from birth playing in the Premiership. Bastin proved that it was possible for someone with compromised hearing to play at the top, but it's not quite the same. Forget hearing a coach's instructions or the referee. They're small fry next to the problems of integrating into social situations, which is not perfect for someone trying to play a team sport.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top