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Legend
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I found the following data about Brasil and I find it absolutely amazing! So do you think that Brasil is indeed he country of the future? Comments?Views? I'd specially like to see what the Brasileiros in here think of this.

Cheers.:)


Potential is Brazil's middle name. Born fully grown as the fifth largest nation on earth, Brazil has since added people to its empty spaces, making it today not only the fifth largest in population but also one of the world's largest consumer markets. On top of this, Brazil possesses an enormous store of natural resources, much of which is still untapped, and one of the world's most extensive industrial parks.

What amazes people most about Brazil is that it has managed to accomplish so much so quickly so quietly. The country's geographical position far from the news capitals of the world, its tendency towards isolation and its propensity to undervalue its own achievements have combined to keep much of the Brazil story under wraps. Here are a few highlights:

* With a gross domestic product of more than $550 billion, Brazil today is the tenth largest economy in the Western world, half as large as the economy of Mexico and nearly three times as big as Argentina. It is bigger than the economy of Russia, and one and a half times as big as South Korea, its main rival for the title of most developed emerging economy.

* Brazil is by far the most industiralized of the developing nations in the world, with the most highly developed domestic consumer market.

* Brazil is one of the world's major steel producers.

* Brazil produces as many automobiles as Great Britain, and it is the world's third largest aircraft manufacturer.

* Brazil's hydroelectric potential surpasses that of any other nation, and the world's largest hydroelectric plant is Brazilian.

* Brazil is the world's largest producer of iron ore, the fifth largest producer of aluminum, and the second largest producer of tin. It is also a top-ranking producer of other metals, including manganese and gold.

* In addition to being the largest exporter of coffee in the world, Brazil also produces more fruit than any other country. It is the third largest producer of soybean and cocoa and its cattle herd is the fourth largest in the world.

* Agriculture, which once dominated the Brazilian economy, today accounts for only 12 percent of gross domestic product, while manufacturing adds up to 39 percent and services 52 percent.

* In the 1970s and 1980s, consumer spending in Brazil rose by an average that was significantly higher than that for the industrialized countires.

* Cofee is no longer the king of Brazilian exports. Today, industiral goods account for 67 percent of the total. Brazil exports automobiles, steel products, shoes and airplanes and is the fifth largest arms exporter in the world.

These achievements have provided Brazil with a modern and diversified economy that has placed it on the threshold of graduation to the ranks of the economic heavyweights. For economists this is simply a matter of time. With its large industiral base, its growing domestic and foreign markets and its vast natural resources, Brazil's continued ascention in the rankings seems assured.
 

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Great potential squandered by socialism and crooks, and socialist crooks...just like Russia, whose potential in resources dwarfs any nation on earth, and China, whose human potential dwarfs any nation on earth...could add India to the soup, their problem is corruption and a strange spinelessness. Unless there's a cultural seachange, Brazil will always be a developing nation with great potential that refuses to develop...
 

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Possessing large and well-developed agricultural, mining, manufacturing, and service sectors, Brazil's economy outweighs that of all other South American countries and is expanding its presence in world markets. The maintenance of large current account deficits via capital account surpluses became problematic as investors became more risk averse to emerging market exposure as a consequence of the Asian financial crisis in 1997 and the Russian bond default in August 1998. After crafting a fiscal adjustment program and pledging progress on structural reform, Brazil received a $41.5 billion IMF-led international support program in November 1998. In January 1999, the Brazilian Central Bank announced that the real would no longer be pegged to the US dollar. This devaluation helped moderate the downturn in economic growth in 1999 that investors had expressed concerns about over the summer of 1998, and the country posted moderate GDP growth. Economic growth slowed considerably in 2001 - to less than 2% - because of a slowdown in major markets and the hiking of interest rates by the Central Bank to combat inflationary pressures. Investor confidence was strong at yearend 2001, in part because of the strong recovery in the trade balance.
GDP:
purchasing power parity - $1.34 trillion (2001 est.)
GDP - real growth rate:
1.9% (2001 est.)
GDP - per capita:
purchasing power parity - $7,400 (2000 est.)
GDP - composition by sector:
agriculture: 9%
industry: 32%
services: 59% (2000 est.)
Population below poverty line:
22% (1998 est.)
Household income or consumption by percentage share:
lowest 10%: 1%
highest 10%: 46.7% (1997)
Distribution of family income - Gini index:
59.1 (1997)
Inflation rate (consumer prices):
7.7% (2001)
Labor force:
79 million (1999 est.)
Labor force - by occupation:
services 53%, agriculture 23%, industry 24%
Unemployment rate:
6.4% (2001 est.)
Budget:
revenues: $100.6 billion
expenditures: $91.6 billion, including capital expenditures of $NA (2000)
Industries:
textiles, shoes, chemicals, cement, lumber, Arms iron ore, tin, steel, aircraft, motor vehicles and parts, other machinery and equipment
Industrial production growth rate:
1% (2001 est.)
Electricity - production:
342.302 billion kWh (2000)
Electricity - production by source:
fossil fuel: 5.85%
other: 3.74% (2000)
hydro: 88.97%
nuclear: 1.44%
Electricity - consumption:
360.641 billion kWh (2000)
Electricity - exports:
0 kWh (2000)
Electricity - imports:
42.3 billion kWh
note: supplied by Paraguay (2000)
Agriculture - products:
coffee, soybeans, wheat, rice, corn, sugarcane, cocoa, citrus; beef
Exports:
$57.8 billion (f.o.b., 2001 est.)
Exports - commodities:
manufactures, iron ore, soybeans, footwear, coffee, autos
Exports - partners:
US 24.4%, Argentina 11.2%, Germany 8.7%, Japan 5.5%, Italy 3.9%, Netherlands (2001)
Imports:
$57.7 billion (f.o.b., 2001)
Imports - commodities:
machinery and equipment, chemical products, oil, electricity, autos and auto parts
Imports - partners:
US 23.2%, Argentina 11.2%, Germany 8.7%, Japan 5.5%, Italy 3.9% (2001)
Debt - external:
$251 billion (2001)
Economic aid - recipient:
NA
Currency:
real (BRL)
Currency code:
BRL
Exchange rates:
reals per US dollar - 2.378 (January 2002), 2.358 (2001), 1.830 (2000), 1.815 (1999), 1.161 (1998), 1.078 (1997)
note: from October 1994 through 14 January 1999, the official rate was determined by a managed float; since 15 January 1999, the official rate floats independently with respect to the US dollar
Fiscal year:
calendar year
 

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Transportation
Railways:
total:
broad gauge: 5,679 km 1.600-m gauge (1,199 km electrified)
narrow gauge: 24,666 km 1.000-m gauge (930 km electrified)
dual gauge: 336 km 1.000-m and 1.600-m gauges (three rails)
standard gauge: 194 km 1.440-m gauge
note: in addition to the interurban routes itemized above, Brazil has 247.8 km of suburban railway consisting of 170.8 km of 1.600-m gauge (75 km electrified) and 77 km of 1.000-m gauge (1999 est.)
Highways:
total: 1.98 million km
paved: 184,140 km
unpaved: 1,795,860 km (1996)
Waterways:
50,000 km
Pipelines:
crude oil 2,980 km; petroleum products 4,762 km; natural gas 4,246 km (1998)
Ports and harbors:
Belem, Fortaleza, Ilheus, Imbituba, Manaus, Paranagua, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande, Salvador, Santos, Vitoria
Merchant marine:
total: 165 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 3,662,570 GRT/5,875,933 DWT
note: includes some foreign-owned ships registered here as a flag of convenience: Chile 2, Germany 6, Greece 1, Monaco 1 (2002 est.)
ships by type: bulk 32, cargo 25, chemical tanker 5, combination ore/oil 9, container 12, liquefied gas 11, multi-functional large-load carrier 1, passenger/cargo 5, petroleum tanker 54, roll on/roll off 10, short-sea passenger 1
Airports:
3,465 (2001)
Airports - with paved runways:
total: 647
over 3,047 m: 6
2,438 to 3,047 m: 21
1,524 to 2,437 m: 153
914 to 1,523 m: 407
under 914 m: 40 (2001)
Airports - with unpaved runways:
total: 2,738
1,524 to 2,437 m: 72
914 to 1,523 m: 1,316
under 914 m: 1,350 (2001)


Radio broadcast stations:
AM 1,365, FM 396, shortwave 161 (of which 91 are collocated with AM stations) (1999)
Radios:
79 million (1997)
Television broadcast stations:
158 (1997)
Globo the 4th largest broadcasting company in the world (after ABC,NBC and CBS of USA)
Televisions:
56.5 million (1997)
Internet country code:
.br
Internet Service Providers (ISPs):
75(2000)
Internet users:
27.94 million (2001)
Sports Arena (Stadiums) 586 (Only 2nd to the US)
 

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fangul said:
Great potential squandered by socialism and crooks, and socialist crooks...just like Russia, whose potential in resources dwarfs any nation on earth, and China, whose human potential dwarfs any nation on earth...could add India to the soup, their problem is corruption and a strange spinelessness. Unless there's a cultural seachange, Brazil will always be a developing nation with great potential that refuses to develop...
Sei un mito.
I couldt have said it any better.
 

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fangul said:
Great potential squandered by socialism and crooks, and socialist crooks
Just for the record: Brazil only has a major socialist party since 1980 and Lula is the first left-wing government in power in Brazil in more than 40 years.
 

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I know that Brazil produces almost half of the worlds Iron ore and have the reserves and capacity for much more.

Russia, like USA have depleted many of their resources. the big ore producers now is Australia, China and Brazil.
 

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gOD said:
Just for the record: Brazil only has a major socialist party since 1980 and Lula is the first left-wing government in power in Brazil in more than 40 years.
:howler: And there goes fangul right-wing conservative bulishiting down the drain. Too bad they bended over to Bush yesterday and agreed to have the "free trade" reference in ... too bad.
 

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What sort of debate is this? Countries with large populations and abundant natural resources prosper. No-one would argue with that. What's being debated? The IMF loans? The Brazilian national debt? Monetary policy complacency? Brazilian stereotypes?
 

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fangul said:
Great potential squandered by socialism and crooks, and socialist crooks...just like Russia, whose potential in resources dwarfs any nation on earth, and China, whose human potential dwarfs any nation on earth...could add India to the soup, their problem is corruption and a strange spinelessness. Unless there's a cultural seachange, Brazil will always be a developing nation with great potential that refuses to develop...
Funny that we have never had a socialist ruler. First time we are having is Lula.... and his government techinically is far from communist or socialist;)

San Siro,

Brazil has enourmous potential, but it will still take a while for the country to really take off to its potential. Their is a cultural lapse since the times of colonization. We have a "latin culture" together with a Roman Catholic culture inserted in teh country. That meaning that their is the culture that you can do some thing wrong and then nothing will be wrong with you because you can be pardoned by the church. In anglican cultures, your a viewed that working hard is a benefit... something not seen very well in Latin culture as you may well know... as your French.

And their are tons of other reasons which i will be typing all day and i can't really be bothered........ but i can explain to you when you come down to brazil and we take a choppinho in Ipanema checking out all the nice girls;)

But just one thing..... put 200 million jews in this country and we and within 50 years we are at least 2 times richer than the USA.

Obs: i'm not jewish;)
 

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bono said:
Payman is Quebequa (sth which he is ashamed of facing), so its rather different for him - a Latin culture dominated by agnlican world and issues. :tongue: :D
In other words.... he knows better than ANYONE what i'm talking about:howler: :howler: :howler: :howler:
 

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Lets put something...
San_Siro:

The bad thing is that Brazil is like that for decades. It is not the potential will make us big enough.

Fangul:

This is false. The Socialism of Brazil is more similar to the Eastern Europe socialism, not the old Russian Marxism movemment. (Ze, FHC is a socialist as well). And that is no problem.
In fact, since Colonial days, Brazil rich's share of the population have little or almost no spirit for capitalistic risk and the governamnet always had to lead most of development. The truth is that the governament also have to do in social area as well.
And frankly, the problem of brazil is related not to the "left" parties like PT, but to the "right" like PMDB or PFL who are tradicionalist against any change in our society.
Our society is dominated by a vision of public resources seen as private by those in power. Of course, this is a trait from the Colonial time, when that is what happened.
Not to mention, a "colonial complex" of the culture, which lead many places to vallue too high the europe-USA culture, economy and philosophy rather than our own production. It is not a simple cultural market domination MTVlike, it is a old thing that seems to make our writers,scientists and politics always try to copy what is done outside as if it would be able to understand and explain Brazil.
 

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JCamilo said:

Not to mention, a "colonial complex" of the culture, which lead many places to vallue too high the europe-USA culture, economy and philosophy rather than our own production. It is not a simple cultural market domination MTVlike, it is a old thing that seems to make our writers,scientists and politics always try to copy what is done outside as if it would be able to understand and explain Brazil.
I find this hard to believe - I've always thought the Brazilian as one of the most creative and inventive in the world. This character trait is most familiar to us on the soccer pitch, but it's there in the cuisine, art and fashion too.
 

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JCamilo said:
Lets put something...
(Ze, FHC is a socialist as well).
If FHC is a socialist , then I'.\m Ghandi:howler: :howler:

That guy is the biggest BS of all.... socialist only in his mouth prior to power... after he had power we all know his "socialist" acts and attitudes.:rolleyes: ;)

Also, who votes in these policiticians?? It is the people
Were do these politicians come from?? from the Brazilian Population.
If everyone was educated with better principles and justice actually worked (in terms of laws for everyone and having speed) this would be a different place.

But even being like this, a whole mess, I still want to live here for the rest of my life.... considering that I have a US passport and have lived in Europe many years. I prefer to have the kind of brazilian life that i have , than the same sort of similar life in another country:)


Pila,

In this quesite Jcamilo is completely right. Poeple in the Brazil normally don't value the good cultural traists of Brazil... specially the northeast, which is so rich and cool. Another reason why we are still in the "development" stage!
:( :fero: :fero: :fero: :yuck:
 

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Pila:

Be creative and inventive (which is something hard to say who have more) we are. Outgoing, friendly, emotive, we are. But we are creative with the ability of this cultural colonialism. Contradictions are more than often a trait of complex cultures.

Ze:

He is socialist. Of his own definition and the majority of the definition. Socialist acts are not the same as "Popular" or "good", his education law for example, is a example of socialist law , and there goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
bono said:
Payman is Quebequa (sth which he is ashamed of facing), so its rather different for him - a Latin culture dominated by agnlican world and issues. :tongue: :D
WTF are you talking about Bono?:stress: Stop smoking that thing you've been smoking all your life long!!!!:fero:

Me, a Québécois??:eek::OMG!!!! Jamais de la vie!!!!:stuckup:
:tongue:

I am NOT a Québécois!!!But French, Français, Francès, Francese, Francés etc.... Capisci?:fero:

:tongue:

Thanks Ze and JC for your input, as always very informative!:thumbsup:

But my question is this: Brasil is blessed with ressources and potential that few countries can match/dream of, so why doesn't the country, the governement educate their people on a mass scale in order to fullfill the immense potential/pool of work-force available in Brasil? Sorry my question may look naive, but it still puzzles my mind. Just look at how S.Korea was 50 years ago, or Japan and look at them now? They had 1/10th of 1/2 of Brasil's potential and ressources and look at them now!!!It really bugs my mind to see so much ressources/talent/potential go wasted....Can anyone shed some lights into this?

Cheers.:)

P.S. I believe that Brasil is indeed the country of the future that I am planning to move there once I finish school!!:stuckup::happy:

P.S.S. Ze, that chopinho on Ipanema will be on me buddy!!!;) I should be coming in May, God willing:); are you going to be in Rio in May?:)
 

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the answer is simple, San_Siro. Those groups in power, structures that exist since the colony, have no interest to see educated the people.
And see, I am not even talking about to educate because its is good. I am talking the good capitalist thing about creating "educated" people able to work and consume. They would have rather the system of "take advantage of what is given rather than work for" (by the way, those are the minority that have the power. THe people here, work and work a lot)
 

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You implied that we have problem with the socialist groups here. I am just telling you the socialist groups here are not the pwoerful burocracy social governaments of Marxist tradition, but the liberal tradition of eastern europe.
 
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