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Just as I thought that the country's financial problems won't affect the team in any way, this came...:(
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By now, Argentines are getting accustomed to the country's rotating door of officials dashing themselves against the myriad financial problems besetting the bankrupt nation. The comings and goings of new administrators, comptrollers, ministers and even presidents appointed by the beleaguered government causes barely a raised eyebrow as Argentina's economic rut deepens.

On Saturday, economist Roberto Lavagna became Argentina's second economy minister in three months after President Eduardo Duhalde presided over the 10-minute swearing-in ceremony. And on Wednesday, the four-year recession is poised to take another victim  but one which stands to cause more than a passing ripple of concern to the nation at large.

Marcelo Bielsa, the national football team coach, who engineered Argentina's runaway World Cup qualification campaign, stunned the country yesterday by revealing that he would quit his post this week unless he was paid £500,000 owed to him by the Argentine Football Association (AFA).

The shocking revelation came only days after AFA president Julio Grondona announced to the Argentine press that 'Bielsa will be going to the World Cup,' while admitting that 'at the moment there are no dollars in Argentina so we can't give him any.'

Bielsa delivered a categorical, less than equivocal response to an English newspaper yesterday: 'Unless everything is resolved by this week, I will not be going to the World Cup finals," he said. "I am extremely angry about the situation and I am mentally exhausted. It's dragged on far too long and the time has come to make a stand. If the money has not been received by Wednesday, I'll resign. I'm married with a young daughter and we have had to live without a salary for seven months."

Grondona had made it clear that all debts to coaches and players would be cleared as soon as the AFA received their payment from Fifa for participating in the World Cup, which starts next month. Yet that may not be soon enough if the likeable coach carries out his threat. It is estimated that he will only receive about a third of the money he was promised for coaching the Albiceleste, the joint favourites, in Japan and the Korean Republic.

Argentines, who have taken to the streets to demonstrate against any number of economic measures, most recently last week when the government imposed a freeze on banking for five days, may view the loss of Bielsa as one austerity measure too far.
 

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This is merely quoting the same article! :mad:

Ever since Sunday, every media organisation has been writing about the article in the News of the World. This is the only source! And I am somewhat doubtful about the validity of this source. If people aren't aquainted with the news of the world, its a cross between the National Inquirer and the Sun: Tits and gossip.
 

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Yes, this is the only source as you have quite rightly pointed out leg100. Bielsa has an ongoing salary dispute with AFA but there is nothing out of Argentina quoting Bielsa as resigning or anything of the sort. As far as I'm concerned the article from News of the World is just plain old BS...
 

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Interesting article below regarding the situation. And today is wednesday ;)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport3/worldcup2002/hi/team_pages/argentina/newsid_1961000/1961280.stm

Marcelo Bielsa told the English tabloid The News of the World that he was on the verge of resigning.

It would be interesting to know how the English tabloid secured the exclusive interview, since Bielsa only speaks on the record in press conferences.

There is indeed a problem with the Argentina coach, who is owed some $490,000 in back pay.

A resignation is always possible - he is not called 'El Loco' for nothing.

But it would not make a great deal of sense.

First because the current situation in Argentina is one of desperation.

Job prospects

People who have worked all their lives and recently lost their jobs are unable to get their hands on their savings.

The country once seen as South America's workers' paradise is descending into chaos.

Just a few months ago it was enshrined in the constitution that one peso was equal to one dollar.

Now the rate is almost three to one. It is a time when everything needs to be renegotiated, including the payment of the national team coach.

For Bielsa to jump ship when so many are suffering would do nothing for his credibility with the Argentine people.

Even in the cold terms of financial self-interest, resignation would be an odd move.

Far better for Bielsa's job prospects would be to be seen doing a good job with Argentina in the World Cup.

The doors of the richest European clubs would open wide - as they did, for example, for Cesar Luis Menotti, the first of Bielsa's predecessors to win the World Cup.

After stepping down from the national team he found himself at Barcelona.

Bielsa could divide today in order to multiply tomorrow.

Amateur ethos

There is also a sense in which Bielsa's resignation would be a monstrous hypocrisy.

His team qualified with four games to spare. With mission accomplished, the coach paid tribute to what he saw as one of the key factors in the success of the campaign - "the amateur spirit of the players".

He meant that in the search for success his squad had gone above and beyond the call of duty.

With almost all of them based in Europe the marathon qualification format was a gruelling experience.

Huge amounts of travelling were involved, with severe temperature changes and even the problem of altitude at the other end.

But the players stuck it through to the finish. Often they paid out of their own pocket to upgrade their ticket to first class, so they could arrive more refreshed.

And even when it was clear that the team were going to qualify, no one ducked the awkward games.

For example, everyone turned up for the trip to the extreme altitude of Bolivia. And there in La Paz, when they were 3-1 down with two minutes to go, they still found the energy to pull level.

That is the spirit in the Argentina camp that Bielsa has fostered.

It would be indicative of strange times indeed if the pilot chose this moment to bail out of the plane.
 

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My friends I only read the Sun for the naked ladies,if you are looking for serious journalism look elsewhere. They don't know what to invent because of the panic they feel:D .The English tabloids are looking for who to blame in case of a defeat, off course the blame will never be on the team but on the foreigner, in this case his name is "Sven".They have been investigating him and his affairs in order to probably accuse him of being more interested in fornication than on the english team, that is normal, they do that all the time.:frownani:
 
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