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You got a deal major. I feel your pain!

I know a good hosting company who won't interfere with the project.

aranycsapat.com and aranycsapat.net are taken.

but aranycsapat.org is available!
Ya should make the URL in English..like "Footballsgreatestteam.com"
 

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2nd greatest.

This is the best by far...

-----------------Rabóczki--------------
-Hrutka----Korsós Gy---Sebők----Mátyus-
-----------------Halmai------------------
-Dombi/Pisont------------------Korsós A--
----------------Illés(c)-------------------
-------Klausz/Torma-----Egressy----------



I win games 20-0 with them on FIFA.
 

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So...last year this wasn't bumped and we didn't celebrate. Dumfukkks.

Well today there was a nice report on the BBC with footage I have never see before.

Did anyone else watch? Truly amazing!

Morts, you must have seen it.
 

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Really good article on what the result did (or didn't do) for England

“One had always said that the day the continental learned to shoot would be the moment British football would have to wake up. That moment has come at last.” Geoffrey Green, The Times. November 1953.
English football loves an anniversary and, on Monday, we can mark that it has been precisely 60 years since the game looked at itself in the mirror and was struck by the sudden, awful realisation that it was not clad in finery, as it had imagined. It wore no clothes.
We always count the ‘years of hurt’ from 1966. We are mistaken. They really started in 1953 on the day that the England team was thrashed 6-3 at Wembley by Hungary. It was a watershed afternoon.
The national side had been beaten before but not like this, not at Wembley and not by foreigners. They had never lost so comprehensively and that defeat raised deep questions about the entire methodology of the domestic game.
As a landmark date in English sport, November 25 1953 is far more relevant than the freak of the World Cup triumph in 1966, given everything that has happened since.
A template was set. Inadequate technique – and this is less about ball control than movement, game intelligence, tactical sophistication or imagination -was exposed, not for the first time but in a way that was irrefutable and embarrassing.
English football was plunged into its first period of anguish and self-abasement. Sound familiar? The only difference is that we are not shocked any more.
These days Roy Hodgson’s team can lose twice at Wembley in five days, out-passed by Chile and Germany, and we shrug. In 1953 it was unprecedented and almost unimaginable, certainly to the stunned players.
Geoffrey Green’s contemporary account of the 1953 match in The Times remains a classic. “There is no sense in writing that England were a poor side,” he wrote. “Taken within the framework of British football they were acceptable. But here, on Wembley’s velvet turf, they found themselves strangers in a strange world, a world of flitting red spirits.”
Hungary’s football, Green continued, “was a mixture of exquisite short passes and the long English game. The whole of it was knit by exact ball control. They shot with the speed of archers. It was Agincourt in reverse.”
Defeat was so comprehensive, the gap in quality so profound, that English football was forced to debate how it had been left so far behind.
It beat itself up, asking why its methods seemed so primitive, its set-up so orthodox. How ‘the continental’ was able to play with more unpredictability and nuance.
“It was the low point of my football career,” said Jackie Sewell, England’s inside-left. “But I was glad to be part of it because none of us had ever witnessed football like it. We knew we had been part of history and we knew we had to change.”
English football had to change, but did it?
In 1955, Brian Glanville published his splendidly splenetic bookSoccer Nemesis. It berated the motherland of football not just for the decades of inertia and insularity which had led to humiliation at the skilful feet of Ferenc Puskas and Nandor Hidegkuti but for its failure to find the right solution.
He described how the game in the UK decided in the wake of the Hungary thrashing that its players were not working hard enough. More graft, more commitment.
“The reflection that what was wrong with British training, and had been wrong for many years, was its quality rather than its excessive quantity scarcely occurred to anyone,” Glanville wrote.
“Players who had atrophied their imaginations by running endlessly round the track were now to run around the track still more. Defeat had failed to bring a grain of wisdom.”
It was not that English football was bereft of skill. As Green wrote, the team which faced Hungary was not a bad one – it contained Billy Wright, Stanley Matthews, Jimmy Dickinson, Stan Mortensen and Ernie Taylor.
What was lacking was collective intelligence, clever movement, daring. And little changed. English football failed to use its brain creatively.
Too many coaches remained hung up on physicality and rigid organisation while other nations continued to develop new strategies, pushing at the frontiers of the sport, willing to experiment.
There was no lack of good intentions. Months before the Hungary defeat, Stanley Rous, secretary of the governing body, had written of the need for modernisation, starting at the FA.
“Public institutions can become all too set in their ways, and they are apt to be timorous of new ideas and cling to outmoded practices,” he explained.
“This is the moment to ask ourselves if age has sapped the FA’s vitality, and if its activities are still prompted by the pioneering spirit.”
Yet there cannot have been a revolution because, precisely 60 years later, we find ourselves asking the same questions.
Here we are with Greg ****’s FA commission still trying to fathom why England is playing catch-up with the best in the world, breeding too few footballers with intelligent movement and flair.
On Monday, it will be sixty years precisely since ‘the continental’ first exposed the English weakness. We want to change, yet something deep within our culture keeps getting in the way.
 

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That one part: ""We were out-speeded, out-smarted and out-stayed … I can only hope it will have a revitalising effect, and jolt our soccer chiefs into the realisation that control of the ball at speed is the secret of success nowadays".

Thats how I feel right now about our team.

Nice read :thumbusp: Thanks.
 

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what's the fuss about it, it was a crappy England side after all. same as if today some above average team like say Belgium or Holland goes to Austria or Scotland (who also have a decent past both) and beat them 6-3 :yawn:
 
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