What Football Is About: Basics! - Xtratime Community
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post #1 of 33 (permalink) Old September 14th, 2004, 20:53 Thread Starter
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What Football Is About: Basics!

"What Football Is About: Basics!" - Exactly!

Like the "Skills Development" thread, we can use this for coaching methods to brush up your skills and improve the "basics".

You overlook passing a ball ten yards with both feet, or working on your first touch, but for an outfield player, these are two vital things, which should be continuously worked on to mainain the good standard.

When training with a friend I realised that only 8/10 times by first-touch is as good as it should be, and that only 9/10 passes on my right foot, and 8/10 passes on my left foot are good enough. I should be really working on making no mistakes.

I am looking for us to post drills, to help each other on basic drills for all basic aspects of the game.

For instance, - passing, first touch, accuracy in passing/shooting, e.t.c.
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post #2 of 33 (permalink) Old September 15th, 2004, 02:41
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Good idea, I'll stick it.

People overvalue running. While fitness is very important, it's on the ball that you make your name. Just work on basic footskills. Keepy-uppy is so important to the continued development of any player at any age. Don't worry about the fancy skills, just keep it up, your touch will get so much better.

Also, a lot of people don't work enough on heading. Throw the ball off a brick wall and head it back repetitively. A friend of mine is a good player, a hard tackler, good on the ball, fast, but sometimes he struggles at the back because he's scared of the ball when it comes at him in the air, and he won't head it.
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post #3 of 33 (permalink) Old September 15th, 2004, 11:10 Thread Starter
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I don't have much time, right now, but I'll post more later.

I try to spend 10 minutes a day, (if I can), just left to right, juggling, and this shows because I can bring the ball out the air fairly well.

I then try to spend five minutes, bringing the ball out of the air. Using it with insides of feet, and sole of the foot, technique is a big basic for me.
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post #4 of 33 (permalink) Old September 20th, 2004, 12:00 Thread Starter
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If you don't have a goal, what I normally do is make a goal, (out of trainers/bag, whatever), and I have two big boards behind the goal, (or use someone's fence or something ), and place a tennis balls inside the posts, both sides of the goal. it's good for aiming to get accuracy in the corners.

Of course, I am lucky with the boards, (two cricket stoppers), because the ball comes back to me. Try if you can getting something behind the goal, so that the rebounds back to you.

I also do sprint work. I use half a "Mini Soccer" pitch. What I will do is jog the first three sides, and then sprint the fourth side, then on the second way round, I will jog the first two sides, then sprint the last two sides. On the third time I jog one side, and then spring 3 sides, then sprint all four sides.

It's tiring, but don't give up, I try do that twice, but yeah, it's tiring.
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post #5 of 33 (permalink) Old September 22nd, 2004, 15:41
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Ball control is I believe the most important thing, it can get you out of a tight situation if you have a good first touch, it will prove to be invaluable especially in cruicial (attacking or defending) goal situations.

Playing practice matches on smaller pitches with less people helps, as does playing with heavy 'futebol de salao' type balls which bounce less.
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post #6 of 33 (permalink) Old September 23rd, 2004, 02:50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amiumtaur
I also do sprint work. I use half a "Mini Soccer" pitch. What I will do is jog the first three sides, and then sprint the fourth side, then on the second way round, I will jog the first two sides, then sprint the last two sides. On the third time I jog one side, and then spring 3 sides, then sprint all four sides.
I do the same thing, only with a full sized pitch. It's better work, if you're up for the task.

I also recommend a lot of 1 on 1 with a friend. If you're playing one on one all of the time, how often are you going to be on the ball? Or working on defending a man when he goes at you? Two of the most important things in football, and you work on them non stop if you play 1v1. What a friend and I do is take duck tape and tape up fields on walls and play. It works on your creativity on the ball, finishing, and defending a man.

Great basics work.
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post #7 of 33 (permalink) Old September 24th, 2004, 15:06
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Hi, i cannot really kick that far , in both clearances or long passes , can u provide some tips , thanks

yazoo
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post #8 of 33 (permalink) Old September 24th, 2004, 16:35 Thread Starter
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Cool Gio.

Rapid, I would say to you to relax and be confident. Striker underneath the ball with the front of your foot, and follow through. Make sure that you lean back for height.

Remember ACCURACY over POWER. If you can learn the tecnhique, then power will come with it.
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post #9 of 33 (permalink) Old September 24th, 2004, 18:39
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Power isn't really about swinging your foot through the ball as hard as you can, it's about making a pure, clean connection.

Just practise hitting the ball against a brick wall with perfect technique.

Remember, plant your non-kicking foot firmly beside the ball, lock your ankle, strike through the ball, jump up, and land on your kicking foot. Just keep doing this perfectly, and great power will come with it.
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post #10 of 33 (permalink) Old November 28th, 2004, 06:10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapid
Hi, i cannot really kick that far , in both clearances or long passes , can u provide some tips , thanks

yazoo
That is a big problem with younger players as they havent been taught the proper technic. Follow through is important but there are three factors an power and distance its the pasic rule of Physics Mass x velocity 1) where you hit the ball with your foot is important. The instep is the part that has the most mass of the foot, yet if you dont lock your ankle when you strike the ball and your foot gives you will lose 50% of your fource. 2) Speed of your leg striking the ball. You need to practice pulling your hip back and bending the knee and getting a whipping action of your foot through the ball.
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post #11 of 33 (permalink) Old November 28th, 2004, 06:15
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thanks
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post #12 of 33 (permalink) Old December 8th, 2004, 20:58
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heading. Just really jumping to meet the ball in the air rather than let it drop.
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post #13 of 33 (permalink) Old December 9th, 2004, 21:42
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Try this keepie-uppie exercise = it increases first touch and technique greatly...

Stand infront of a big wall and keep the ball up in the air using your feet(every part of your foot), knees, head, chest,whatever...every 5-10 juggles try to control the ball (on the top of your foot, between your legs, on your back,...really be original = the only point is that the ball stops bouncing), then flick the ball back up and continue juggling...after 5-10 juggles kick/flick the ball against the ball and follow its movement and continue juggling...That is a repetition!

Each week add one repetition to your routine...at first its a difficult exercise(if you can't control the ball on your feet then train that only by dropping the ball on the floor and when it bounces try to control it),but after a while it comes natural to you.

BTW I am a Futsal player(amateur though as the sport isn't so popular here) and I found out that I have the upper hand over most regular football players my age simply because of the ball control...though my Stamina sux And I wouldn't make it as a soccer player anyway...not many 192 cm wingers with no stamina out there p

Random fact about Jose Mourinho #371:

In 1989, he married Matilde, whom he had known since childhood. They have two children: Matilde and José Jr.

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post #14 of 33 (permalink) Old December 13th, 2004, 04:40
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how can u defend without the rough play or lunging out?
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post #15 of 33 (permalink) Old December 15th, 2004, 14:15
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I don't play outdoor soccer that often but when I do I use this trick from my basketball days...never go in for a tackle unless you are 100% u'll get the ball...stick to the player air-tight...and keep your eyes on his body (least mobile part) not on his legs, or for the love of god on the ball(but always know where the ball is at)...cause he can trick you easily with a couple of step-overs...just stick by your defender...there ain't a lot of Zidanes out there that can keep the ball at their feet all the time when they dribble...hope it helps

Random fact about Jose Mourinho #371:

In 1989, he married Matilde, whom he had known since childhood. They have two children: Matilde and José Jr.

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post #16 of 33 (permalink) Old December 15th, 2004, 15:48 Thread Starter
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Make sure you can see man and ball.

Don't get too tight to your man because it obstructs your vision, and you will get turned for fun. Have an open body shape and be positioned a few yards behind, close enough so you can attack the ball, and back enough so if he sharply turns you can react.
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post #17 of 33 (permalink) Old December 30th, 2004, 08:45
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Some more basics work

Strike a pass firmly

Something I see all-too routinely in youth football is a tendency to try to finesse a pass too much. Way too many passes are hit weakly within a game. This is bad for all sorts of reasons.

The first is the ol' "hospital ball". No team mate wants one of these played to him, as no good comes out of it. A hospital ball is a pass played weakly to a player setting up a particularly hard challenge between him and an opposing player. It's called a hospital ball because many times one or both players will end up injured from the challenge only caused due to a weak pass.

Second is the fact that you give away posession too much if you strike too many finessed passes. There is a time in a game for finesse, no doubt. But much of the time you'll really have to fire the ball to a team mate to keep from it being intercepted.

Much of this particular bad habit is from youth levels (8-13) where you just have to get it there for a team mate for the pass to be completed. However, as you get older players get fitter, quicker, smarter, and bigger. All of this makes passes increasingly difficult to play. Often times you have to play the ball with pace to get it past defenders. In all honesty, you have to challenge your own players and keep them in check with your passes. If they can't control your pass if it's played well to them with pace, then they aren't cut out for your level of football. Many players fear their teammates being mad at them for playing a pass too quickly, but the player who played the miscontrolled pass is the one who should be upset, as he's done his part of the job, it was the other player failing.

Tackle firmly

Another thing that is a common failing amoung youth and amateur footballers is a tendency to tackle weakly if at all in games. I've seen far too many times players pulling out of a tackle where they think they could get hurt or where it just looks a bit rough for their liking.

At the highest levels, the players tackle unbelievably hard. You have to get used to this at younger levels if you want to progress. Really thump the ball when making a tackle. Don't take the man without the ball, but if you get a good chunk of him [AFTER] making the tackle, then all the better. As long as it's clean. you have nothing to fret over.

Often times in a professional game, you'll actually be able to hear a particular tackle between two players, or you'll see a sliding tackle see the ball cannoned up the field 30 or 40 yards. This just displays how hard the tackles are at the elite levels. You very rarely if ever see a ball tackled 30 yards up the field in a youth game, and when you do you know you have a prospect as he knows what he's doing.

Never pull out of tackles, either. You're more likely to get hurt and you already look bad for pulling out, so you should just go for it. Believe me, a coach will much prefer a hard tackling player who never pulls out of a tackle then a cutesy player who has a very tricks but lacks that determination in the tackle. Coaches see a lot in how a player tackles, so show what you're made of by displaying spirit and equality in every challenge.

Use your head/chest/thigh

Youth games see too many players trying to pull down passes that are letter-high with their feet. Why do you think players are allowed to use any part of their body but their feet? I know I've said it before, but watch professional games. You'll see players using anything on their body to pull down a pass in the air. It's a complete rarity to see a player wailing their foot high in the air, trying to bring down a pass that's at their middrift.

If the ball is coming towards your chest, control it with your chest. If it's at your head, jump up and head the ball. If all else fails, use your thigh. Just don't wail your feet about, you look dumb, are less likely to control/win the ball, and are at a greater chance of getting injured.

I have more, I'm just a bit tired [2:45 A.M.] but I'm hoping this can help some younger players.
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post #18 of 33 (permalink) Old January 11th, 2005, 17:01
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Another thing that is a common failing amoung youth and amateur footballers is a tendency to tackle weakly if at all in games. I've seen far too many times players pulling out of a tackle where they think they could get hurt or where it just looks a bit rough for their liking.
Thats because Youth and Amateurs are supposed to be fun. You dont wanna break your legs for nothing, and you dont wanna hurt your opponents either in amateur games.
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post #19 of 33 (permalink) Old March 3rd, 2005, 10:34
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Great post Isaac

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Originally Posted by Lehuynhduc
Thats because Youth and Amateurs are supposed to be fun. You dont wanna break your legs for nothing, and you dont wanna hurt your opponents either in amateur games.
Actually, Isaac has a very valid point. When making a block tackle (the most common form of tackle where a player uses the widest part of his foot i.e. the instep) to 'block' the ball from getting past him), it's extremely important to put your whole weight into the tackle.

If you go into such a challenge half-heartedly, it could lead to serious damage of your ankle/leg, especially if the attacking player happens to take a swing as you tackle. I had a bad experience in a similar situation, where a player was about to take a shot, and because I was scared of getting injured, I just placed my foot in front of the ball instead of getting my body weight behind the tackle. I ended up sidelined for 2 weeks :thmbdown:

No matter what the level of competition, you should always commit 100% to your tackles, for your own safety. There's a big difference between practising safety in football and taking a full swing at the ball when defending against a player from the local U-9's team.

Another important thing when challenging for the ball is to not be afraid of physical challenges. I started playing indoor soccer at 16, and was usually up against guys who were often 10 years older than me. I have a fairly decent touch, but when I first started playing, I spent a lot of my time being shoved off the ball by the shoulders.

You don't necessarily have to be extremely physically strong to deal with this problem; again, it's all about commitment. If you're challenging for a loose ball and the player you're up against knows how to use his body to stop you from getting to it, the only solution is to play the same game and do a bit of push and shove. It's not the cleanest part of the game, but hey, that's football

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Christ came to pay a debt he didn't owe, because we owed a debt we couldn't pay.
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post #20 of 33 (permalink) Old March 10th, 2005, 00:17
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Great post Isaac



Actually, Isaac has a very valid point. When making a block tackle (the most common form of tackle where a player uses the widest part of his foot i.e. the instep) to 'block' the ball from getting past him), it's extremely important to put your whole weight into the tackle.

If you go into such a challenge half-heartedly, it could lead to serious damage of your ankle/leg, especially if the attacking player happens to take a swing as you tackle. I had a bad experience in a similar situation, where a player was about to take a shot, and because I was scared of getting injured, I just placed my foot in front of the ball instead of getting my body weight behind the tackle. I ended up sidelined for 2 weeks :thmbdown:

No matter what the level of competition, you should always commit 100% to your tackles, for your own safety. There's a big difference between practising safety in football and taking a full swing at the ball when defending against a player from the local U-9's team.

Another important thing when challenging for the ball is to not be afraid of physical challenges. I started playing indoor soccer at 16, and was usually up against guys who were often 10 years older than me. I have a fairly decent touch, but when I first started playing, I spent a lot of my time being shoved off the ball by the shoulders.

You don't necessarily have to be extremely physically strong to deal with this problem; again, it's all about commitment. If you're challenging for a loose ball and the player you're up against knows how to use his body to stop you from getting to it, the only solution is to play the same game and do a bit of push and shove. It's not the cleanest part of the game, but hey, that's football
I see your point about tackling and I agree.
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