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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old March 10th, 2005, 17:24 Thread Starter
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A.R.T. announcements reviews talk

This thread also serves as calendars to all international art events.

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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old March 10th, 2005, 17:25 Thread Starter
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Stolen Munch art found in Norway

source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertain...ts/4324775.stm


Edvard Munch's Blue Dress was stolen along with two portraits

Norwegian police have recovered three works by artist Edvard Munch in Oslo, the day after they were stolen.
The pieces, worth an estimated $320,000 (£166,000), were taken from Refnes Gods Hotel, near the southern city of Moss.

The two lithographic prints and one watercolour were taken from the hotel's collection of seven Munch works.

Police said they made several arrests in connection with the heist, but did not yet know if it was linked to last year's theft of Munch's The Scream.

"Several people have been arrested and the paintings have been recovered", Iver Stensrud of the Oslo police told public radio NRK.

The Scream and Madonna are still missing. The Munch Museum in Oslo, where they were stolen, remains closed pending a security update.


Munch's The Scream was stolen from an Oslo museum last August

Refnes Hotel displays hundreds of paintings by Norwegian artists, but none are protected by alarms.

Hotel managers said they had seen no need for that as the hotel was staffed 24 hours a day.

'Hard to sell'

An employee was said to have surprised two male thieves on Sunday night, but they escaped with three pictures. No-one was injured in the burglary.

Hotel owner Vidar Salbuvik said the two stolen lithographs were portraits, including one of the artist himself, and that the third was a 1915 watercolour entitled the Blue Dress.

Art experts said the stolen pieces would be very hard to sell on the open market, as they were too well known to be bought by reputable dealers.

Critics say Munch developed an emotionally charged painting style that influenced the 20th Century Expressionist movement. He died in 1944 at the age of 80.

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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old March 10th, 2005, 17:27 Thread Starter
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Basquiat :thmbup:

11 March through 5 June 2005

Brooklyn Museum,
Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing,
4th & 5th Floors
Brooklyn, New York



This exhibition presents more than ninety works by the American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), whose spectacular career contributed to the revival of American painting in the 1980s. Organized by the Brooklyn Museum and co-curated by Fred Hoffman, Kellie Jones, Marc Mayer, and Franklin Sirmans, Basquiat will include approximately seventy paintings and twenty works on paper, some of which have never before been on view in the United States. The most comprehensive retrospective in over a decade, Basquiat celebrates the artist’s extraordinary use of color and drawing, his integration of text and complex iconography, and his development of themes related to the African Diaspora.

Following its presentation at the Brooklyn Museum, Basquiat will travel to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. A full-color catalogue, with essays by the four co-curators and published by the Brooklyn Museum in association with Merrell Publishers, accompanies the exhibition.

Introduction

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988) was born and raised in Brooklyn, the son of a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican–American mother. At an early age, he showed a precocious talent for drawing, and his mother enrolled him as a Junior Member of the Brooklyn Museum when he was six. Basquiat first gained notoriety as a teenage graffiti poet and musician. By 1981, at the age of twenty, he had turned from spraying graffiti on the walls of buildings in Lower Manhattan to selling paintings in SoHo galleries, rapidly becoming one of the most accomplished artists of his generation. Astute collectors began buying his art, and his gallery shows sold out. Critics noted the originality of his work, its emotional depth, unique iconography, and formal strengths in color, composition, and drawing. By 1985, he was featured on the cover of The New York Times Magazine as the epitome of the hot, young artist in a booming market. Tragically, Basquiat began using heroin and died of a drug overdose when he was just twenty-seven years old.

This exhibition gathers together more than one hundred of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s finest works, including many that have never been shown in the United States. It is organized chronologically, with special sections highlighting Basquiat’s interest in music, language, and Afro-Caribbean imagery, along with his use of techniques such as collage and silkscreen.

The exhibition seeks to demonstrate not only that Basquiat was a key figure in the 1980s, but also that his artistic accomplishments have significance for twentieth-century art as a whole. Basquiat was the last major painter in an idiom that had begun decades earlier in Europe with the imitation of African art by modern artists such as Picasso and Matisse. Inspired by his own heritage, Basquiat both contributed to and transcended the African-influenced modernist idiom.

Continued ...

source: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibi...2005/basquiat/

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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old March 12th, 2005, 02:12 Thread Starter
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French Court Bans 'Last Supper' Ad

by HÉLÈNE FOUQUET
The New York Times (published 11 March, 2005 nytimes.com)

The Roman Catholic Church in France won its lawsuit yesterday to ban a fashion-house advertisement built around Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper" and showing a female Jesus, women in designer clothes in place of the apostles, and a half-naked man. The order against the fashion house, Marithé & François Girbaud, bans the advertisement from billboards, but the designers may continue to publish it in print. The church sued the Girbauds' advertising agency on the grounds that it had misused a religious image and offended a group of people because of their religious affiliation, its lawyer said. "Justice does not evolve anymore than the church in this country," Mr. Girbaud's lawyer, Bernard Cahen, reported that he said in response to the ruling. Mr. Cahen said the decision would be appealed. He added, "This isn't a loss, but this unwanted publicity will lead people to talk more about the Girbauds."

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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old March 12th, 2005, 02:55
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interesting article!
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old March 12th, 2005, 04:36
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They'd best not get a gander at the Pillsbury Doughboy Last Supper I have in my kitchen.

If you are in San Francisco, CA from today thru April 10, go see the 'Shopdropping' show at the Pond (Valencia and 14th streets). I for one enjoy that type of thing.
http://www.mucketymuck.org/b_1_exhib.../shopdropping/

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old March 16th, 2005, 21:28 Thread Starter
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Sartre
Celebrating the Centennial Birth of Jean Paul Sartre
An exhibition of manuscripts, books, photographs and correspondence

François Mitterrand Library
Bibilotheque nationale, Paris, France
9 March - 21 August, 2005



Photo: Studio Ethel/Rapho
Jean-Paul Sartre in Paris in 1952, with Simone de Beauvoir, right,
and the writer and musician Boris Vian and his wife, Michelle.


To Honor Sartre, France Buffs a Pedestal the Writer Rejected

By Alan Riding, The New York Times (Pub March 16, 2005)

PARIS, March 10 - A century after his birth, 25 years after his death, Jean-Paul Sartre has not been forgotten, but he is also not remembered altogether fondly. For many American conservatives suspicious of French thinkers, he still typifies the Left Bank intellectual spouting obscure philosophy amid clouds of smoke. Even for many French people, his embrace of Communist causes placed him on the wrong side of history.

That said, anniversaries are hard to resist. So, as the final resting place of great French literature, the French National Library is celebrating the occasion with a major exhibition on Sartre the philosopher, novelist, playwright and "intellectuel engagé." And in doing so, it is nudging him toward a place alongside Voltaire, Hugo and Zola in the pantheon of France's politico-intellectual heroes.

But is Sartre remotely relevant today?

As political visionaries, two of his contemporary critics, the novelist Albert Camus and the sociologist Raymond Aron, stand taller because their view of freedom was untainted by association with Stalinism or Maoism. And outside France, Sartre is certainly read less than his own muse, Simone de Beauvoir, whose book "The Second Sex" is a founding text of feminism.

Yet there is no underestimating Sartre's influence over French intellectual and political life for three decades after World War II. Indeed, many who grew up in his shadow, as supporters or opponents, are now among the politicians, intellectuals and journalists who shape public opinion here. And in that sense, traces of Sartrism still flow through the country's veins.

What Sartrism actually means, though, is hard to pin down because of the many Sartres, not only the fiction writer who won and refused the 1964 Nobel literature prize, but also the existentialist philosopher, the political activist whose positions frequently changed and the intellectual celebrity who won headlines as a Left Bank ambassador to the likes of Mao, Tito and Fidel Castro.

This multifaceted life is on display at the new François Mitterrand National Library through Aug. 21. And while it is notoriously difficult to build an exhibition around a writer, the show does its best through photographs, artworks by friends like Giacometti and Picasso, manuscripts, letters, diaries and first editions as well as sound and film clips, interviews he gave and excerpts from performances of his plays.

Still, first and foremost, Sartre was a philosopher. He taught philosophy in French lycées from 1930 to 1944. And more than his early novels, like "Nausea," and his wartime plays, "The Flies" and "No Exit," it was his monumental treatise, "Being and Nothingness," that thrust him into a position of leadership over the postwar Paris intelligentsia. Through him, existentialism became a synonym for the individual's responsibility to promote freedom.

While French conservatives seemed more disturbed by the long hair and loose morals of the bohemian zazous, as existentialist groupies were known, Sartre tried to explain his thought in simple phrases. "Existentialism defines man through his action." "The only thing that permits a man to live is the act." "A man engages in his life, defines his profile and, outside this profile, he is nothing."

Put simply, human beings determine their destiny through what they do rather than who they are.

It followed logically, then, that Sartre should be politically engaged, though until Paris's liberation in August 1944, he had not been. He played no role in the turbulent politics of France in the 1930's. He visited Berlin in 1933 and did not recognize the Nazi menace. And after a few months as a prisoner of war, he cheerfully put on plays and published books in German-occupied Paris. But after the war, a different Sartre emerged.

Placed in the dock today, Sartre would face two charges: between 1952 and 1956, he was a fellow traveler of the French Communist Party, albeit breaking with it after the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956. Between 1970 and 1974, he supported French Maoists, even famously selling their newspaper on the streets of Paris. His counsel might respond that in both cases he was defending their right to exist more than their views. But he nonetheless won new enemies.

On other issues, time favored him. He was among the first to criticize France's use of force to hold on to its Indochinese and Algerian colonies. He went to Cairo to defend Israel's right to exist before the 1967 war. He stood with rebellious students in Paris in May 1968 and repeatedly denounced the Vietnam War. He even broke with Mr. Castro in 1971 over Cuban persecution of the writer Heberto Padilla. And late in life, he called for Vietnamese boat people to be given refuge here.

Meanwhile, he wrote books of all genres, including "The Words," an acclaimed autobiography of his early life, and "The Family Idiot," his Flaubert biography. As editor of the journal Les Temps Modernes, he orchestrated intellectual debate. Only after his eyesight began to fail in 1973 was he reduced to making his views known through interviews.

Yet when he died, on April 15, 1980, many in the huge crowd that followed his funeral cortege seemed to sense that an era was ending. Since then, the causes he supported have been replaced by others. French lycée students can now study philosophy without understanding existentialism. Among his plays, only "No Exit" is still regularly staged. Even Libération, the left-leaning daily he helped former Maoists create in 1973, described him this month as "a man of past letters."

To admirers of Sartre, though, what survives is perhaps more important. Conceding that Sartre's image was still not fixed, Annie Cohen-Solal, whose well-received 1985 biography of Sartre was reissued in English this month by The New Press, said she preferred to view him more as "a role model, a way of doing things, than as a doctrine or a body of work." And as such, she added, he remains "an ethical compass."

Michel Winock, an author of the Dictionary of French Intellectuals, said Sartre's "taste for the subversive" led him to both political misjudgments and positions that to this day appear legitimate. As for what his legacy is, Mr. Winock told the weekly Nouvel Observateur, "I would say above all his moral coherence: his absolute refusal to be resigned in the face of injustice."

Still, in an era when issues of conscience are drowned out by media cacophony, one of Sartre's greatest fears may yet come true. When he rejected the Nobel Prize, he said that "a writer should refuse to be allowed to be transformed into an institution." Yet a quarter-century after his death, the exhibition at the National Library risks turning the eternal rebel into a statue: it comes to praise him, but also to bury him.



Jean-Paul Sartre, undated photograph.

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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old March 17th, 2005, 13:07
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what r u studying bonita?
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old March 17th, 2005, 15:07 Thread Starter
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Sampdoria, I got my Ph.D. in art history three years ago and am now working as a contractual museum curator. I still study and research a number of items relating to prints, drawings, literature .. in my spare time.

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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old March 17th, 2005, 15:43
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VISIONARY BELGIUM, C'est arrivé pres de chez nous

An exposition to capture the spirit of a special country. One that like all other nations, is based on nothing but coincidence, but is one of the few to openly admit that. Being the border of Latin and Germanic culture, Belgium has always been a melting pot that could only operate in diversity and compromises. Therefore it's institutions are complex, but also the example for our modern multi-cultural and multi-etnic world. It's art therefore can be nothing but Surealism, finding pride in the acceptence of the absurdity of our complex situation/world. All is brought with a lot of humor an relativism. If that isn't enough visit it because it's the last exposition by Harald Szeemann. The composer of Visionary Belgium died 2 days before his work opened.

http://www.bozar.be/175bozar/EN/175_expo.html

We can bomb the world to pieces, but we can't bomb it into peace!

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post #11 of 31 (permalink) Old March 18th, 2005, 00:55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonita
Sampdoria, I got my Ph.D. in art history three years ago and am now working as a contractual museum curator. I still study and research a number of items relating to prints, drawings, literature .. in my spare time.

I was wondering why you knew soo much! :thmbup:


So that means you could describe an artwork really well? I am the opposite, i need to write everything down first and really think of what i have to say, standing up and talking about my work really doesnt work.

Last edited by Sampdoria; March 18th, 2005 at 01:43.
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post #12 of 31 (permalink) Old March 18th, 2005, 01:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonita
Sampdoria, I got my Ph.D. in art history three years ago and am now working as a contractual museum curator. I still study and research a number of items relating to prints, drawings, literature .. in my spare time.

one of XT best minds!

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post #13 of 31 (permalink) Old March 20th, 2005, 16:31
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Gods and Monsters
Blockbuster exhibitions that trace the artistic influence of one painter on another are all the rage. The Bacon–Picasso show in Paris reveals why

By ANN MORRISON | PARIS



Sunday, Mar. 20, 2005
Take the paintings of one popular artist (preferably, but not necessarily, Pablo Picasso). Juxtapose them with the works of another genius. Compare, contrast and voilà: You have a blockbuster exhibition guaranteed to bring in the crowds. The phenomenal success of the three-city "Matisse Picasso" show in 2002-03 helped inspire the thoughtful "Picasso Ingres" exhibit in Paris last year. Now there's the traveling "Turner, Whistler, Monet" exhibit currently at London's Tate Britain. This is the golden age of spot-the-influence shows. Some museumgoers see them as a two- or three-for-one bonus, others as a force-fed art history lecture. But there's no denying that when such exhibitions work, they can have an unmatched power. One of the best yet is "Bacon Picasso: A Life of Images" at Paris' Musée Picasso until May 30.

There is a single, irrefutable reason the pairing works: Francis Bacon spent his entire career aspiring to Picassohood. In fact, Bacon maintained that his first encounter with the Spaniard's work, the 1927 show "A Hundred Drawings by Picasso" at the Paul Rosenberg Gallery in Paris, made him want to be an artist. "Why don't I try it?" the Ireland-born, England-raised drifter asked himself; within months, he did.

In the first-ever systematic analysis of Picasso's influence on Bacon, the show gathers some 100 works of the two 20th century legends. The Musée Picasso even attempts to re-create the show at the Paul Rosenberg Gallery, with plates of 40 of the drawings Bacon said "shocked" him into his career. Given that both artists specialized in distorted images, anthropomorphic monsters and screaming faces, the Rosenberg drawings are surprisingly mild. In fact, they are lyrical studies for Picasso's neoclassical works that were criticized at the time as a betrayal of the revolutionary spirit behind his Cubist masterpiece Les Demoiselles d'Avignon 20 years before.

Perhaps Bacon, who never met his idol, was drawn to images that seemed tolerant of homosexuality, like the near-naked androgynous youths (one playing the flute, the other transported by the music) in the sketches for Picasso's monumental Pipes of Pan. When Bacon arrived in Paris at age 18 — after his father caught him in his mother's underwear and threw him out — he was certain of his homosexuality, but less certain of his artistic talent. He flirted with interior design when he returned to London in 1929 and, once he started painting, destroyed most of his early efforts. One work that survives is a 1933 Crucifixion, which was reproduced that same year in Art Now, a book on contemporary art; on the facing page, tellingly, is a similar work by Picasso, a small-headed Bather (1929) with raised arms.

Indeed, crucifixions are one of the major themes of the show, even though neither Picasso nor Bacon was at all religious. In a 1992 interview, Bacon called Picasso's crucifixion scenes "still my favorite of his works." Picasso's oil-on-wood Crucifixion (1930) is a vibrant, surreal retelling of the Calvary story, with cross, nails, lance, weeping women and garments being divided by dice-throwers. Bacon's interpretation, Second Version of Triptych 1944: Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, ignores all this action — even the cross — and concentrates instead on three anguished black-and-white figures on an orange-red background.

Picasso and Bacon used practically identical language to describe their work on crucifixion paintings: Picasso said he had started to draw an interpretation of a macabre early 16th century altarpiece when it became "entirely something else"; Bacon claimed he had the idea of first putting figures around the base of the cross, but then "something happened" and he "just tried to make something else." Bacon also applied his Picasso obsession to his Triptych in Memory of George Dyer (1971), a tribute to his model and lover. You'll see visual echoes of Dyer's shadowy profile in Picasso's nearby The Studio (1928-9).

The Picasso pictures in the show date mainly from the late '20s and early '30s, when the painter was flirting with Surrealism. Bathers with contorted necks, lovers with daggerlike teeth, minotaurs with ravaged victims — all find some allusion in Bacon's works. "I think of myself as a maker of images," Bacon once said, that produce an impact "immediately on the nervous system." Picasso gave him the artistic vocabulary to do that. Bacon claimed it was this "brutality of fact" that linked their work. But Bacon clearly wins in the cruelty stakes, especially in his nudes. His Lying Figure (1969) is an upside-down mound of desiccating flesh with a needle in its arm. On the facing wall, Picasso's Large Nude in a Red Armchair (1929), with head back and legs daintily crossed, looks benignly bourgeois by comparison.

Picasso and Bacon took different paths toward portraiture, too. While Picasso used live models, Bacon depended on photographs. Not that he painted from photos; he merely used them, as well as just about everything else in his cluttered studio, from newspaper clippings to garbage-can lids, as starting points for his creative energies. Still, the results can be startlingly similar, as you can see in the entire room of heads painted by both artists. Bacon's 1971 Selfportrait shares some Cubist influences with Picasso's 1909 Head of a Man. But in almost every case Bacon's portraits reflect more motion, energy and distortion — and deliver a fiercer punch to the nervous system.

Bacon was entirely self-taught, and Picasso was hardly his only influence. Bacon's debt to Rembrandt's 1655 Carcass of Beef, for example, is obvious in his own renderings of raw meat. But when Bacon died in 1992, he left behind a London studio dominated by the reproductions, press clippings, published anecdotes and other worked-over memorabilia of one painter: Pablo Picasso. Such single-mindedness makes for a great two-person show



~~ this is a must see!

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post #14 of 31 (permalink) Old March 20th, 2005, 17:57 Thread Starter
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This one's for Che.


Philippe Halsman (American, b. Latvia, 1906-1979)
Portrait of Salvador Dalí, 1954
Gelatin silver print, 13 5/8 x 10 3/4 inches



DALI

Philadelphia Museum of Art

16 February - 15 May 2005



The Philadelphia Museum of Art is privileged to be the only American venue to host the major centennial retrospective exhibition devoted to Salvador Dalí (1904-1989). This exhibition, timed to coincide with the celebration of the 2004 centenary of the artist’s birth, considers all aspects of the artist’s long and controversial career. On view is a vast array of Dalí’s highly influential Surrealist paintings, as well as his early Cubist-inspired works and later experiments with optical illusions and perspective, as in Still Life - Fast Moving of 1956. This thorough reevaluation of Dalí’s remarkable contribution to modern and contemporary art is augmented by examples of his work in other fields, including theater design, filmmaking, and literature. Over 200 works of art are on view, many of which are being shown in the United States for the first time.

DALI exhibition information

One reminder: Duchamps' great pieces are also at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Dali show closes on 15 May.

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post #15 of 31 (permalink) Old April 1st, 2005, 03:28 Thread Starter
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To kick off April Fool's Day, a salut to my main man, Robert Crumb

... and his sidekick, Mr. Natural




As Salon Magazine explicates --

R. Crumb

Is the bull-goose legend of underground comix the Brueghel of our time or the purveyor of an arrested juvenile vision?

By Steve Burgess
- - - - - - - - - -

May 02, 2000 | S ir Thomas Crapper did not really invent the flush toilet. The word "gringo" was not inspired by the American troops who sang "Green grow the grasses-o," during the Mexican-American War -- the word was in use 100 years previously. Still, those popular misconceptions and countless others survive through constant repetition, and someday they will be joined by new linguistic fables even now being born.

Here's a likely candidate -- years from now it will be widely circulated that the word "crummy" derives from the work of cartoonist Robert Crumb, a world-class malcontent of the late 20th century. Crumb surveyed the urban landscape of his era and pronounced his verdict: Everything sucks big time, including humanity and, most especially, Robert Crumb. "At least I hate myself as much as I hate anybody else," Crumb once said. Coming from the author of "Self-Loathing Comics," you can take that to the bank.


Crumb certainly did. His status as the bull-goose legend of underground cartooning meant that in the early '90s he was able to trade six of his sketchbooks for a house in the South of France. But Crumb's career has never been about maximizing financial possibilities -- that would mean signing on with mainstream pop culture, which Crumb, of course, despises. In fact, Crumb's repeated rejection of commercial opportunities (he once turned down an offer to do a Rolling Stones album cover because he hated the band) marks him as one of the last remaining exemplars of the egalitarian '60s hippie ethos he came to represent for so many people.

There's only one problem with this -- Crumb despised the '60s hippie ethos he came to represent for so many people. And the '70s sucked even worse and he's not that enthused about drawing and he really hates Bruce Springsteen. "The only burning passion I'm sure I have," he once said, "is the passion for sex."

Robert Crumb was born in Philadelphia on Aug. 30, 1943, to a Marine father and a devout Catholic mother. His first cartooning efforts were inspired not by love of the art form but by sibling dynamics -- as the third of five children young Robert inevitably fell under the sway of his oldest brother. "Charles forced me to draw comics," Crumb recalled in "The R. Crumb Coffee Table Art Book" (Back Bay Books). "If I didn't draw comics I was a worthless human being. It was tedious labor, so I worked fast to get it over with."

Crumb and his brothers soon became experts on the comic form, treasuring late '40s work like Little Lulu and, later, Walt Kelly's Pogo. The 1995 documentary "Crumb," directed by the cartoonist's friend Terry Zwigoff, unforgettably details the Crumbs' suburban gothic world -- a father described as a "sadistic bully" who broke Robert's collarbone at age 5, a mother hooked on amphetamines and, down in the trenches, a fierce three-way fraternal rivalry dominated by the increasingly reclusive and unbalanced Charles.

Crumb's burgeoning misanthropy was stoked, as is so often the case, by adolescence. "I realized I was a geek and I wasn't going to make it with the girls," Crumb wrote. "I felt so painfully isolated that I vowed I would get revenge on the world by becoming a famous cartoonist."

In the late '50s young Robert discovered Mad magazine and later Humbug, which introduced him to the work of Harvey Kurtzman. "I lived, breathed and ate the pages of his magazines," Crumb recounted in a 1989 cartoon called "Ode to Harvey Kurtzman." "I was truly in love."

In 1962 Crumb got his first real job as an illustrator at American Greetings in Cleveland. The tedious grunt work had him on the brink of quitting until he was elevated to the role of illustrator for the slightly edgier Hi-Brow line. (Crumb's boss was future Ziggy creator Tom Wilson, who encouraged Crumb to make his drawings "less grotesque." Crumb claims it took years to expunge the resulting "cuteness" from his work.) After sending an early Fritz the Cat cartoon to Kurtzman at Help! magazine, Crumb received the following note from his boyhood idol: "We really liked the cat cartoon, but we're not sure how we can print it and stay out of jail."

But print it they did. Soon Crumb was working as Kurtzman's assistant at the short-lived Help! (where the staff included future Monty Python animator and filmmaker Terry Gilliam ).

"My dad always said I'd marry the first one who came along," Crumb remarks ruefully in one autobiographical strip. That turned out to be Dana Morgan. "Big mistake," Crumb later wrote -- the new husband was just 21 years old and chronically broke. Nearly destitute, the couple traveled in Europe while Crumb continued to do work for Kurtzman and American Greetings. Dana stole food.

The turning point in Crumb's career came in 1965 -- specifically, it came in a little glass vial. "LSD was legal the first time I took it," Crumb wrote. "The first trip was a completely mystical experience ... It was the Road to Damascus for me. It completely knocked me off my horse and altered the way I drew. I stopped drawing from life."

With the exception of Fritz the Cat, all of Crumb's best-known creations date from his post-acid phase, including his most inspired character, Mr. Natural. Crumb's bearded little guru is no con man -- he's too unapologetic for that. A straight-talking sybarite (booted out of heaven for telling God it's "a little corny" in "Mr. Natural Meets God"), Mr. Natural is chronically plagued by tight-ass neurotics like Flakey Foont and Schuman the Human, and may be the only Crumb creation who can genuinely be described as likable.

Zap Comics, consisting entirely of Crumb art, debuted in 1967, with the artist and his wife selling the first issue on San Francisco street corners. Underground comics are now remembered as an indispensable part of the era, but it was Zap that blazed the trail. "The people who ran the hippie shops looked at Zap and said, 'Comic book? What do we want with a comic book?'" Crumb recalled.

source:
http://dir.salon.com/people/bc/2000...rumb/index.html



If you are in or anywhere near London today, you're in luck. An R. Crumb show, rarity to U.S. fans these days, will open in 8 hours.

Robert Crumb: A Chronicle of Modern Times
1 April – 22 May 2005

http://www.whitechapel.org/content1138.html

Whitechapel Art Gallery
80-82 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7QX

Hours: Tuesday - Sunday 11am - 6pm; Thursday 11am - 9pm
Closed Mondays



Admission free

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post #16 of 31 (permalink) Old April 19th, 2005, 21:36 Thread Starter
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Ah, I controversies!

source: nytimes.com

An Ancient Masterpiece or a Master's Forgery?
By KATHRYN SHATTUCK

Published: April 18, 2005

A scholar has suggested that "Laocoön," a fabled sculpture whose unearthing in 1506 has deeply influenced thinking about the ancient Greeks and the nature of the visual arts, may well be a Renaissance forgery - possibly by Michelangelo himself.


The sculpture "Laocoön," at the Vatican Museums, was unearthed in 1506, but a new theory says it is a forgery by Michelangelo. [Photo courtesy of Lynn Catterson]

Her contention has stirred some excitement and considerable exasperation among art historians in the Classical and Renaissance fields. Many other challenges to accepted attributions have faded quickly into oblivion.

The scholar advancing the theory, Lynn Catterson, a summer lecturer in art history at Columbia University, presented her argument in a talk at the university's Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America on April 6. Maneuvering through a wealth of material - including Michelangelo's drawings, records of his banking activity and his acknowledged reputation as an avid seeker of renown and wealth - she said, "He had the motives and the means."

The strikingly naturalistic sculpture, 951/2 inches tall, depicts a deadly attack on the Trojan priest Laocoön and his two sons by writhing sea snakes dispatched by Athena - or, some say, Poseidon - after Laocoön warned against admitting the Trojan horse during the siege of Troy. It resides in the Vatican Museums in Rome.

In a telephone interview, Dr. Catterson cited a pen study by Michelangelo dating from 1501 depicting the rear of a male torso that resembles the back of the "Laocoön" - and Michelangelo's documented finesse at copying.

"That the Laocoön was carved by Michelangelo explains why then, and why now, its effect is mesmerizing," she said.

Richard Brilliant, Anna S. Garbedian emeritus professor of the humanities at Columbia and an authority on classical antiquities - his works include "My Laocoön: Alternative Claims in the Interpretation of Artworks" (University of California Press, 2000) - said that Dr. Catterson's contention was "noncredible on any count."

For one thing, he said, "she made absolutely no reference to ancient sculptures that could be related to the 'Laocoön,' " including a large body of ancient fragments found just before World War II at Sperlonga, a site near Rome where Tiberius had a luxurious villa, that refer specifically to episodes of the Trojan war.

Some scholars have also found fault in relating the "Laocoön" to the Michelangelo drawing of a torso, now at the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford.

"To my eye, the Michelangelo drawing does not bear a close resemblance to the torso of the Vatican Laocoön," said Katherine E. Welch, an associate professor at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts and an expert in Hellenistic and Roman imperial antiquities, in an e-mail message. "The latter is distinguished by a vigorous torsion or twist, which is lacking in the drawing."

The "Laocoön" was placed at the Vatican Museums by Pope Julius II not long after it was discovered on Jan. 14, 1506, on the Esquiline Hill. Upon hearing the news, the pope immediately dispatched the architect Giuliano da Sangallo to view it; Sangallo brought along his colleague Michelangelo Buonarroti. The men identified the statue as that described by the first-century Roman encyclopedist Pliny the Elder in his "Natural History," who called it "a work superior to any painting and any bronze," one "carved from a single block in accordance with an agreed plan by those eminent craftsmen Hagesander, Polydorus and Athenodorus, all of Rhodes."

Dr. Catterson, 48, said she did not set out to debunk scholarship on the "Laocoön" when she settled on a dissertation topic seven years ago: "How come Michelangelo was a sculptor? Who trained him?"

Her curiosity was soon aroused. As a young artist under the patronage of Lorenzo the Magnificent, Michelangelo had witnessed the Medici family's willingness to spend considerable sums on ancient Greek or Roman objects, which he would have had ample opportunity to study and perhaps try to recreate, she said.

He was an astute forger who earned his Bacchus commission after a carved sleeping Cupid that he had buried in the ground to "age" had been sold to a wealthy cardinal in 1495.

Then there was recent scholarship on bank withdrawals and deposits between 1498 and 1501 that suggests that the sculptor was buying chunks of marble while accumulating substantial income that could not be accounted for, Dr. Catterson said, and several letters from Michelangelo to his father that spoke of some marbles but failed to explain how he was using the others.

Dr. Catterson suggests that Michelangelo, a manic worker who carved on as few as three hours of sleep a night, would have had the time to create the "Laocoön" while working simultaneously on the "Pietà," for which he signed a contract in 1498 and which he completed by July 1500.

He had his own house, which included ample work space, and a trusted assistant, Piero d'Argenta, she said. He also had access to Greek marble, found in excavations around Rome.

That the "Laocoön" is made of seven pieces of marble may suggest that Michelangelo needed to transport the finished work unnoticed to its point of discovery, where it could have been assembled and joined on the spot, Dr. Catterson added.

William E. Wallace, a professor of art history at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of several books on Michelangelo, was not as quick as other art historians to dismiss Dr. Catterson's claims.

"Until I read the full argument in a reputable academic publication, I'm going to reserve a final judgment," he said, noting that since 1996, 17 discoveries of or attributions to Michelangelo have made national news - and then been discredited or forgotten. "My first reaction was: 'Oh, come on. Not another.' However, the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I became. I think this one has the greatest lasting power."

For Dr. Catterson everything was just a little too perfect about the discovery of the "Laocoön," which was in fairly good shape after presumably some 1,500 years when it was found by a farmer more or less where Pliny had predicted.

"It's almost as though it was discovered to order," she said.

But to Leo Steinberg, a prominent Michelangelo scholar, the evidence simply does not add up - neither the time nor the bank receipts nor the secretiveness. "We know that at least a dozen different people would have been involved in the process," he said. "And we know that Michelangelo made many enemies who would have been delighted to accuse him of a forgery of that scale. All of this strains credulity that in an Italian community at that time in the 1490's, there was no gossip, no squealing."

Professor Wallace agreed that hard proof was lacking but said he was willing to consider Dr. Catterson's argument. "We'll never have the certitude a scientist gets," he said. "It can only be tested by the weight of scholarly opinion and time.

"But Lynn is an excellent scholar and well trained. And the intriguing thing is that nobody who studies classical art in a way wants the 'Laocoön.' They find it kind of a Hellenistic embarrassment, maybe because it really doesn't look like anything else comparable in the history of classical art."

"And besides," he added, "we can never prove that Shakespeare really wrote 'Hamlet' at this point. They're still arguing about it."



When I first saw the sculpture many years ago, I felt that it was too "robust" for a Hellenisitc item. Yeah I was correct.

What really interests me about the New York Times article though, is the number of self-righteous long bearded so called experts who are willing to sling mud at a little scholar who dares to contradict. So what else is new in academia?

For me, football is irrationality, tribal, passionate... - Almogàver
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Exhibition in Harlem Offers New Look at Malcolm X

By CHRISTINE HAUSER

source: The New York Times (nytimes.com)
Published: May 20, 2005

His voice was silenced 40 years ago by assassins during a rally in Washington Heights.

But the words of Malcolm X were heard and seen once again yesterday by hundreds of people at the opening of an exhibition of his recorded speeches, letters, photographs and personal items at the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, in Harlem.


(Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times) Tara Lake, a graduate student at the University of California, Los Angeles, was among the visitors on


The first page of a letter written and signed by Malcolm X on August 4, 1964, to his wife, Betty, from Alexandria, Egypt. (Schomburg Center)

Some visitors were old enough to have heard Malcolm X in person when he spoke at rallies in the 1960's. Others, like Amaru Zaire, 3, could learn only from the public legacy of one of the most important black figures of the 20th century.

"Who is that?" the little boy said, holding his mother's hand as he cocked his head to listen at the start of the exhibition. Around them, people stood transfixed as a television screen showed excerpts from Malcolm X's speeches and other appearances.

Amaru's mother, Jenee Robinson, 25, answered her son in a whisper. "That's Malcolm X," she said. "Now what did I teach you about him? When he talked, what did people do?"

Amaru replied: "They followed him. They listened."


Malcolm X at prayer in New York City, circa 1963. (Schomburg Center)

The 250-item exhibition, "Malcolm X: A Search for the Truth," coincides with the 80th anniversary of his birth in Omaha. It displays, for the first time, items that his family and organizers of the exhibition say will enable scholars to take a more accurate look at his work and life.

"It will basically throw a shadow on all the historians who have paraphrased my dad," said one of Malcolm X's daughters, Malaak Shabazz, who was born after her father's death. "You can't paraphrase or rewrite an icon or human being."

Within two hours of the opening of the exhibition, which runs through Dec. 31, several hundred people had visited the library, on Malcolm X Boulevard and 135th Street. They walked along a timeline of Malcolm X's life, from his birth through his murder at the Audubon Ballroom on Feb. 21, 1965, fixed in frame after frame of black-and-white photographs and letters in tidy penmanship.

Students took turns reading to each other from his letters from prison and gazed up at photographs of him with his wife and daughters, or praying at a mosque in Egypt, or shaking hands with well-wishers in other countries.

One of the pictures shows the eager faces of young black men and women pressed up against police barriers at a 1961 rally on West 125th Street. A young man with a wide, gap-toothed grin and a stylish suit peers into the camera.


Malcolm X on a university tour. (Schomburg Center)

"That is me," Earl Harley, 69, a visitor to the exhibition, said, picking himself out from the group in the photograph. He began to cry.

Mr. Harley, who sells handmade belt buckles on West 116th Street, said he could not remember exactly what Malcolm said that day. "I belonged to his temple," he said, wiping his eyes. "He taught us to be fair and honest. To keep our heads up. To stay strong."

The eager faces of Mr. Harley and the other participants in the rally that day contrast with the somber expressions in another photograph of mourners waiting in line to view Malcolm's body in an open coffin.

Alethia Ford, 63, who wraps gifts at Bloomingdale's, recalled standing in that line for hours with her son Ricky, then a toddler.

"The line was all the way around the block," she said, looking up at the picture and remembering how she thought Malcolm X looked in the coffin when they finally reached it. "Like a prince," she said.

"His killing took a lot away from us," Ms. Ford said. "But I have what he taught me in here," she said, her hand over her heart.

The man known as Malcolm X evolved from Malcolm Little, a petty criminal and con man. The displays acknowledge the days when he sold drugs and bootleg whiskey and wound up in prison. They also show his process of self-education and eventual conversion to the Nation of Islam. In 1953 he began preaching, and the next year he became the minister of Temple 7 in Harlem.

The exhibition includes pictures of the scene in the ballroom after Malcolm was shot, and the casings of the bullets that killed him.

Ms. Johnson said this was one of the reasons she took Amaru to the exhibition.

"I want him to understand the sacrifices that his people have made for him," she said. "And that superheroes are not only on TV."


Malcolm X at a rally in Harlem, circa 1963. (Schomburg Center)

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post #18 of 31 (permalink) Old June 1st, 2005, 21:45
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How long is the exhibition on for Bonita? I may be over in the States in the Autumn and I'd love to make it to NY to see it. Reading his autobiography was amazing and had me in tears in several places. Such an eloquent and intelligent man, such a shame his life was cut so short.

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post #19 of 31 (permalink) Old June 2nd, 2005, 15:04 Thread Starter
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The exhibition ends on 31 December so there's plenty of time for you to prep that trip, Talya

I will go back and see it again the next time I'm uptown doing research. I saw a documentary last year on the Weather Underground and there were scenes about Malcolm X's life during this period ... if you can, do make it to the exhibition.

Oh and yes, an advance welcome to NYC :thmbup:

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post #20 of 31 (permalink) Old June 15th, 2005, 16:34
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40th anniversary of the Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco. Have been there many times over the last 25 years. A very cool space.

www.theintersection.org

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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