Goodbye drug mules, goodbye. - Xtratime Community
 
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post #1 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 02:55 Thread Starter
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Goodbye drug mules, goodbye.

The two ring leaders of the Bali 9 drug smugglers were sentenced to death via firing squad yesterday. Good riddance. I have no sympathy whatsoever for these people. They know the risks. It's written on the bleeding passport. They're getting what they deserve as far as I'm concerned.

Goodbye scumbags, you won't be missed at all.
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post #2 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 02:57
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Absolutely

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post #3 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 09:18
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"Brother of Schumy exposed"
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post #4 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 09:24
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True Sir L. Especially the timing of when it happened right after the Shapelle Corby thing, and then these idiots bob up with 9 kg's of H.

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post #5 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 10:17
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What can you do.
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post #6 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 10:46
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give the choice to adults to use drugs or not, instead of always executing the lords that live in the slump while the big boys finance the deals from behind stage.
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post #7 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 19:21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lite®nit
give the choice to adults to use drugs or not, instead of always executing the lords that live in the slump while the big boys finance the deals from behind stage.
Well the "lords" had a choice, to deal drugs or not. Too bad they werent smart enough to know the consequences.




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post #8 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 19:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bean
Well the "lords" had a choice, to deal drugs or not. Too bad they werent smart enough to know the consequences.

Tell me you 'hardliners' watched "Maria Full of Grace" just praying she'd get executed...

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post #9 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 19:55
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A waste of resources, I think. The best way to deal with the criminal element is to legalize drugs; supply goes up, prices go down, and suddenly it's much less appealing to commit crimes because of drugs. The Prohibition Era in the US is a perfect example.
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post #10 of 26 (permalink) Old February 15th, 2006, 23:02
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Tell me you 'hardliners' watched "Maria Full of Grace" just praying she'd get executed...
Im hardly a hardliner(pun unintended). I just dont see a way out of it for these people.

Can you tell a sovereign nation to show leniency and favoritism to your citizens? No.

Can you tell a foreign nation how it should formulate its laws? No.

The only option is to send Mr T and the rest of the A-Team.

The impossible way is for people to be educated on the legal consequences of their actions in foreign countries. Whether its the government's job or up to the people themselves to be educated is another story. I pity the fools. But theres nothing one can do.




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post #11 of 26 (permalink) Old February 17th, 2006, 14:19
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nobody is talking about lifting the penalty, maybe you do not understand or is hard to grasp that such law has no impact in drug trafficking. Period! There is no drug shortage Bali, Tokyo or São Paulo.

A more rigorous approach to money laundry would have a bigger impact while not being as primitive as death sentence, such would serve to punish those who finance instead of only catching the leaders of some huge "mule" group.

This is not one definitive solution, but it beats the hell of some stupid law that sentences to death mostly mules or mules group.
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post #12 of 26 (permalink) Old February 17th, 2006, 14:37
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I think the only real reason why the death penalty exists is so that a person convicted won't 'accidentally' be freed. Otherwise what's the difference between life imprisonment and death to the general public? Either way he/she's gone.

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post #13 of 26 (permalink) Old February 17th, 2006, 15:13
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I think it might be the power of the message sent, which never works. If it was for a serial killer maybe the possibility of being freed is something considered when impossing the death penalty.
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post #14 of 26 (permalink) Old February 17th, 2006, 20:53
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The war on drugs is having little or no effect on the trafficking of drugs, except to make them more expensive and much less clean. If drugs were legalised, drug addiction would become a health issue, and public health would be enhanced. For one cleaner drugs would lead to improved health. By selling drugs in state clinics or stores the government would be able to maintain control over drug sales. As with alcohol, the Food and Drug Administration would guarantee purity and safety. Less risk of poisoning, less risk of OD. Who would you prefer your son/daughter/mother/father get drugs from - Over the counter with real advice/help or from some shady guy in a street corner who's fill the drugs with shit basically? Ir doesn't take a genius to figure it out.

Drug prices can easily double or triple when a large shipment of drugs gets busted. Since the use of all major recreational drugs except opiates has increased since the passing of the laws which illegalised them, the increase in cost cannot be said to discourage the use of the drugs. When a government bans substances like drugs a black market always appears to supply the demand. And who actually profits from all of this? The dealers! Who suffers? Addicts and the people who fall victims through their addiction and crime. Did you know that 80% percent of heroin addicts in Holland are on treatment living virtually normal lives while the UK's is a pathetic 20-30% What does this tell us? People on drugs don't necessarily commit crimes and it can be stopped and controlled. It's a shame most governments and (generally) most people have a really closed mind and bad attitude towards drugs. Alcohol for instance is legal and yet most drugs aren't? It seems very hypocritical to me since 70% of crimes are commited while under the influence of alcohol! Alcohol is more damaging than a drug like heroin in the long run. Obviously there are risks of HIV (if its slammed) and OD. Most drugs are associated with empathy not violence unliek alcohol. I suppose over generations alcohol has become socially acceptable but thats not the point.

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post #15 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 07:38
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they took the risk let them pay the penalty

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post #16 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 07:57
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Ironic, but good thing the Aussies are coming around. When the situation is reversed, that war on drugs hasn't always been obvious:

Melbourne drug courier to hang (In Singapore)
Sunday Herald Sun ^ | 3-20-04 | Lincoln Wright

AUSTRALIA will seek clemency for a Melbourne man who has been sentenced to death in Singapore for drug trafficking.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said yesterday that Australia had a longstanding policy of opposing the death penalty.

If the appeal of Nguyen Tuong Van, 23, against his death sentence fails, Australia would seek clemency, the spokeswoman said.

"As this matter is before the courts, we are unable to comment further."

Australian High Commission officials had attended the trial of Nguyen in Singapore.

"Nguyen can appeal against the conviction. He's speaking with his lawyers," the department spokeswoman said.

Singapore High Court Judge Kan Ting Chiu read out the death sentence against Nguyen Tuong Van yesterday.

"The sentence of this court is that you be taken from this place to a lawful prison, then to a place of execution where you will be hanged by the neck until you are dead," Judge Kan said.

In January, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer tried to persuade Singapore not to execute Nguyen, a sales executive from Melbourne.

High Commission officials present in court yesterday declined to comment.

Nguyen's Australian lawyer, Lex Lasry, said he would likely appeal against the sentence.

Under Singapore law, anyone possessing more than 15g of heroin is presumed to be trafficking and must be sentenced to death.

Nguyen was arrested after Singapore airport police found heroin taped to his lower back and in his backpack during a routine security check as he prepared to board a flight to Australia in December, 2002.

He was charged with

trafficking almost 400g of heroin.

During his trial, the Singapore court heard Nguyen told police he had agreed to smuggle the drugs from Cambodia to Australia to pay off a massive debt owed by his twin brother.

He was attempting to switch planes in Singapore when he was caught at the boarding gate during a routine security check.

Nguyen was born in a refugee camp in Thailand and his family, who are Vietnamese, emigrated to Australia shortly after his birth, the court was told.

Father San Bart, of the Vietnamese Catholic Community of Huon Thien, said he was saddened by the court's decision.

Father Bart, who does not know Nguyen Tuong Van, said while anyone found guilty of heroin smuggling should be punished, execution was not the answer.

He appealed for the Singaporean judicial system to reconsider the verdict.

If his appeal fails, Nguyen would be the first Australian executed for drug trafficking since 1986, when two Australians were hanged in Malaysia.

But Singapore has a history of ignoring leniency pleas from abroad.

In August 1994, Dutchman Johannes Van Damme was hanged for drug offences in Singapore - despite pleas for clemency from the Dutch government and the Netherlands' Queen Beatrix.

Last year, an Australian woman condemned to death in Vietnam on drug trafficking charges had her sentence commuted to life imprisonment in a presidential amnesty after strong protests from Canberra.

Last edited by Firdaus; February 18th, 2006 at 08:03.
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post #17 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 08:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johan
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Right on and it's a better world when at least these scumbags are taken down .Let's plead clemency and be like Pussies for the selfish scumbags who only thought about themselves,pity our government is Piss weak,Martin you say no difference between life and death?I see that with life we still have to see these scums being fed and being able to breathe.next of all this angers me especially when it's a callous murderer who get's to live even in jail for many years and people have the gore to feel sorry for them.But we apparently don't have the sympathy for the victims who are lying six feet under. :irritate: Nice thread Leo.

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post #18 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 08:24 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firdaus
Ironic, but good thing the Aussies are coming around. When the situation is reversed, that war on drugs hasn't always been obvious:

Melbourne drug courier to hang (In Singapore)
Sunday Herald Sun ^ | 3-20-04 | Lincoln Wright

AUSTRALIA will seek clemency for a Melbourne man who has been sentenced to death in Singapore for drug trafficking.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said yesterday that Australia had a longstanding policy of opposing the death penalty.

If the appeal of Nguyen Tuong Van, 23, against his death sentence fails, Australia would seek clemency, the spokeswoman said.

"As this matter is before the courts, we are unable to comment further."

Australian High Commission officials had attended the trial of Nguyen in Singapore.

"Nguyen can appeal against the conviction. He's speaking with his lawyers," the department spokeswoman said.

Singapore High Court Judge Kan Ting Chiu read out the death sentence against Nguyen Tuong Van yesterday.

"The sentence of this court is that you be taken from this place to a lawful prison, then to a place of execution where you will be hanged by the neck until you are dead," Judge Kan said.

In January, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer tried to persuade Singapore not to execute Nguyen, a sales executive from Melbourne.

High Commission officials present in court yesterday declined to comment.

Nguyen's Australian lawyer, Lex Lasry, said he would likely appeal against the sentence.

Under Singapore law, anyone possessing more than 15g of heroin is presumed to be trafficking and must be sentenced to death.

Nguyen was arrested after Singapore airport police found heroin taped to his lower back and in his backpack during a routine security check as he prepared to board a flight to Australia in December, 2002.

He was charged with

trafficking almost 400g of heroin.

During his trial, the Singapore court heard Nguyen told police he had agreed to smuggle the drugs from Cambodia to Australia to pay off a massive debt owed by his twin brother.

He was attempting to switch planes in Singapore when he was caught at the boarding gate during a routine security check.

Nguyen was born in a refugee camp in Thailand and his family, who are Vietnamese, emigrated to Australia shortly after his birth, the court was told.

Father San Bart, of the Vietnamese Catholic Community of Huon Thien, said he was saddened by the court's decision.

Father Bart, who does not know Nguyen Tuong Van, said while anyone found guilty of heroin smuggling should be punished, execution was not the answer.

He appealed for the Singaporean judicial system to reconsider the verdict.

If his appeal fails, Nguyen would be the first Australian executed for drug trafficking since 1986, when two Australians were hanged in Malaysia.

But Singapore has a history of ignoring leniency pleas from abroad.

In August 1994, Dutchman Johannes Van Damme was hanged for drug offences in Singapore - despite pleas for clemency from the Dutch government and the Netherlands' Queen Beatrix.

Last year, an Australian woman condemned to death in Vietnam on drug trafficking charges had her sentence commuted to life imprisonment in a presidential amnesty after strong protests from Canberra.

^ load of bollocks that article. Despite what that says a vast number of the Australian public were of the same opinion that they are for the punishments of the Bali 9. Nguyen just had the sympathy of the ignorant do-gooders. My opinion is still the same, and was in full support of him being executed just as I am of those who were given a death sentence in Bali. If you go into another country you have no choice but to obide by their laws, or pay the price. In Sinagpore the price for trafficking drugs is death, as it is in Indonesia. No sympathy at all.

The thing is, though, that article is wrong. The Australian government never formally sent for clemancy to Singapore to not have Nguyen executed. Howard and Downer said pretty much every day leading to his death: "there is nothing we can do." Nguyen's lawyers, family and supporters (idiots) were pleading to the government to plead for clemency, but the government never did, which was the correct thing to do.
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post #19 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 08:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bean
The only option is to send Mr T and the rest of the A-Team.

I pity the fools.

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post #20 of 26 (permalink) Old February 18th, 2006, 08:50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Leonardo

The thing is, though, that article is wrong. The Australian government never formally sent for clemancy to Singapore to not have Nguyen executed. Howard and Downer said pretty much every day leading to his death: "there is nothing we can do." Nguyen's lawyers, family and supporters (idiots) were pleading to the government to plead for clemency, but the government never did, which was the correct thing to do.
Really. I beg to differ:

http://au.news.yahoo.com/051102/21/p/wmp7.html
http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=74766
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/20...html?from=top5
http://newsfromrussia.com/world/2005/11/03/66884.html
http://www.gnn.tv/headlines/6363/Tim..._of_Van_Nguyen
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