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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old May 15th, 2008, 18:02 Thread Starter
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Slang!

Slang. It's not correct language, but it sho do be interestant.
What words or phrases are unique to the vernacular of your nation, region, prefecture, city or neighborhood. Please provide translations if it is not English, and if it is cursing...euphamise.

I will start off with Northern California's greatest cultural contribution to the English language:

Hella: An all-purpose modifier which is used to show degree. When used in conjunction with the word "cool", hella becomes an even stronger signifier of strength.
"Me and Jose went to the kegger by Serramonte and got hella drunk and it was hella cool."

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old May 15th, 2008, 18:05 Thread Starter
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I think that the word comes from a mispronounciation of the term "hell of". That is kind of hard to beleive, since we in NorCal speak just like the f'in dictionary tells you to and have no accent at all.

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old May 15th, 2008, 18:28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heather View Post
I think that the word comes from a mispronounciation of the term "hell of". That is kind of hard to beleive, since we in NorCal speak just like the f'in dictionary tells you to and have no accent at all.
That can't be true, since it's us Joisyans who speak with no accent and in fact, speak flawless Spanglish - which is just slang for the Queen's English, really.

Having said that, I don't think there's a more famous Joisyan slang than "youse", meant as plural "you". Such as, "Seven smackers fo Newports? Shiiiet, youse crazy."

Freedom is the great liberator of the mind – it threatens only the comfort of the sequacious intellect.

"ai am person tu!!!!"

Fight the Power!!!

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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old May 15th, 2008, 22:16
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is it true some Australians use instead of "seriously" "for cereal"?
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old May 15th, 2008, 23:40 Thread Starter
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Having said that, I don't think there's a more famous Joisyan slang than "youse", meant as plural "you". Such as, "Seven smackers fo Newports? Shiiiet, youse crazy."
Once in Trenton, from whence the world takes, I heard much the same expression, yet it was a box of Kools being haggled over.

We native SF Mission-ites have an accent frequently refered to as "Brooklynesque", so I think we'd manage to unnerstan' each odder without use of a translating dictionary.

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2008, 23:10
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The summer I lived on 24th and South Van Ness, I learned what "good parking karma" was all about

Now I'm curious if anyone knows the origins to:

Get outta here! (meaning unreal, you've gotta be kidding, etc.)

Loose lips sink ships (WW ii slang against spies? Although this phrase makes me think of a date who resembles Bardem...)

Shake-a-leg (hurry up, etc. Where does it come from? Southern USA?)

Return to our mutton (is this French, British, US?)

Shanghai (or Shanghai'ed - a 1920's slang? but what does it really mean?)

.

For me, football is irrationality, tribal, passionate... - Almogŕver
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2008, 23:41 Thread Starter
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Pshaw, try and park on Jersey Street...
I know two of these (guess which one).
1. Ask Elaine Benes.
2. Yep. back in my Grandparent's day, any loose gossip around the Kaiser Shipyards was thought to be but a step away from the ears of Tojo or Himmler, so it was best to zip 'em.
3. Crappy later-day AC/DC song.
4. Sheep loving...could be from New Zealand.
5. Back in the days of the Barbary Coast (not the one Gide was always on about, the other one), able bodied strapping young ploughboys often ended up on east-bound ships after downing a few drinks at the wrong bar. They were "Shanghaied" to Shanghai.

You know the scene it's very hum-drum
And my favorite song's entitled "Boredom"...
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old May 19th, 2008, 11:06
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A popular Dutch slang word is 'eikel'. You can hear it everywhere. Literally it means 'acorn', but it's slang meaning is something like 'dumbass', or 'idiot'. I'm not really sure why or how an acorn became associated with stupidity, but it can be quite confusing for visitors and new residents, who are confronted with this word, look it up in the dictionary to find it means 'acorn' and don't know if it's an insult or a compliment.

Mercedes bastard & Limburger-loving schmuck
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old May 20th, 2008, 17:28
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yepp, loose lips sink ships must be a wartime stuff
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old May 26th, 2008, 21:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agentpippo! View Post
is it true some Australians use instead of "seriously" "for cereal"?
Not that I'm aware.

Um, I'll have to think of some examples that originate in this country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatbox Ana
let me give u a lil love
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old May 29th, 2008, 21:36
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there's so much Irish slang that I wouldn't know where to begin

"Eejit" is a good starting point, denoting a foolish or stupid individual

"Gobshite" or the less common variant "Gobsheen" also serve a similar purpose

"What's the craic?" is also a vital expression in Irish society which serves to enquire how things are going with your associate at the time of delivery

haha

we talk A LOT of sh*t, believe me

and "shake a leg" is surely not American in origin - it's widespread in the UK - an interesting Irish take on this expression is to "throw a shape"
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old May 30th, 2008, 03:08
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and "shake a leg" is surely not American in origin - it's widespread in the UK - an interesting Irish take on this expression is to "throw a shape"
Interesting to know the phrase may be over 230 years old.

One other British slang I learned is headlights, totally incorrect yes but so very funny.

I picked up some fancy words every time I travelled to Hong Kong and China. My favourite Beijing slang (c. 2005) was Xiao Bai which comes from the phrase Bai Zhi (白痴, moron, idiot, brain dead). Calling someone Xiao Bai is not very nice--but with endearment nevertheless.

For me, football is irrationality, tribal, passionate... - Almogŕver
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old June 1st, 2008, 03:14
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Hopefully Glen stumbles upon this thread, could prove useful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatbox Ana
let me give u a lil love
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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old June 1st, 2008, 04:14
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Glen? Using Slang? As if, it must be like a french Bastin

Kat: "JCam, you may quote me now, but you are quite wise".

Kat: "JCam knows, we do not doubt in him".
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old June 1st, 2008, 05:42
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You're right, how embarrassing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatbox Ana
let me give u a lil love
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old June 1st, 2008, 17:40
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Originally Posted by Bonita View Post
Interesting to know the phrase may be over 230 years old.

One other British slang I learned is headlights, totally incorrect yes but so very funny.

I picked up some fancy words every time I travelled to Hong Kong and China. My favourite Beijing slang (c. 2005) was Xiao Bai which comes from the phrase Bai Zhi (白痴, moron, idiot, brain dead). Calling someone Xiao Bai is not very nice--but with endearment nevertheless.
from no less a resourse than www.shakealeg.org/ :


Where did the name ‘SHAKE-A-LEG’ come from?" The term derives from an expression used by officers in the Royal Navy to rouse sailors from their bunks. "Shake a leg!" or "Show a leg!", a captain or first mate would call out to a crewmember, to signal they were awake and ready to take the watch.
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old June 3rd, 2008, 08:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonita View Post
Interesting to know the phrase may be over 230 years old.

One other British slang I learned is headlights, totally incorrect yes but so very funny.

I picked up some fancy words every time I travelled to Hong Kong and China. My favourite Beijing slang (c. 2005) was Xiao Bai which comes from the phrase Bai Zhi (白痴, moron, idiot, brain dead). Calling someone Xiao Bai is not very nice--but with endearment nevertheless.
How would you pronounce these Chinese words?
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old December 5th, 2008, 10:41
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I'd love to be able to properly use slang, but if I did it right now it be a missmash of words used in the wrong context. Same goes for accent.
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