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post #81 of 1477 (permalink) Old February 8th, 2003, 04:53 Thread Starter
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I'm just putting that great article on the history of the Milano Derby here as well so it can remain where it belongs, in this thread. Cheers.

The History Of The Milan Derby
This is an extraordinary article on the history of the greatest derby on earth. It comes from the February 2003 issue of the British monthly great football mag, Four Four Two. It's a very neutral and unbiased article/dossier which is a wealth of information for both Milanisti and Interisti. Enjoy!

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!!

The History of the Milano Derby, by Kevin Buckley.

On a damp Saturday night, 80,000 expectant fans flock to the leafy well-heeled western outskirts of Milan, Italy’s football and fashion capital. From the outside, the three-tiered San Siro stadium resembles a giant Hallowe’en pumpkin, shafts of white light beaming out through the slits of the six huge spiraling walkways around its perimeter.

Once inside, each end suddenly explodes 10 minutes before kick off into huge, perfectly choreographed displays of banners, slogans and colour-coded placards. The whole vibrant spectacle is down to the dedicated work of hundreds of members of the much-maligned ultras, the organised supporters groups only some of whose members engage into violence. But tonight they compete in an artistic battle orchestrated with a synchronisation worthy of La Scala, the city’s other famous theatre a few kilometers away to the east in Milan’s cobblestoned city centre.

The second tier of the curva sud - south bank – of the “home” side disappears under a red-and-black sea of placards. In a seamless scene-change, an enormous banner unrolls above the crowd, 40 meters by 30, depicting a cartoon scene of Milan stars with the slogan, La Storia Infinita – the never-ending story. The 7,300 “visiting” Inter contingent respond by making the curva nord shimmer with hundreds of shiny blue-and-black placards, dotted with the famous bright yellow stars, sported only by teams who have won at least 10 titles.

Then they too unfurl above their heads a huge banner featuring Giuseppe “Peppino” Prisco, one of the club’s most popular directors, who died last season. Much love for his mischievous media comments, the elderly lawyer is shown with his trademark wicked grin and making a vulgar hand gesture. His message “to the worms in hell” is not lost on Milan’s diavoli rossi, the red devils. From the Milan end, the fireworks shoot into the night sky from the front of second tier. The whole show is carried off with style and humour, provoking gasps and applause from the around the packed stadium, and will lead the evening TV sports bulletins.

Tonight’s derby – in Italy the English term is used – has an importance beyond his usual city confines. For the first time in a decade, Milan’s two teams are simultaneously tilting for the Serie A title. Just one week before they had found themselves sharing the very top spot in the table, an event not seen for an astonishing 30 years. The line-ups feature a string of top Italians – Christian Vieri of Inter and his best friend Filippo “Pippo” Inzaghi of Milan, Gigi di Biaggio, Francesco Toldo, Paolo Maldini and his defensive sidekick of 15 years, Alessandro “Billy” Costacurta – but on the night this 253rd Milanese derby is won for Milan by a 12th minute display of Brazilian football geometry.

The gangly Rivaldo threads a flat diagonal pass from the centre circle towards wide player Serginho on the left edge of Inter box. Inter’s Argentinian defender Nelson Vivas, standing in for countryman Javier Zanetti after the latter’s midweek international duties, desperately stretches but can’t cut out the inch-perfect ball. With one deft touch the spidery Serginho takes the ball sharply square inside, wrong-footing keeper Francesco Toldo who is shaping to anticipate a burst towards the byline down the left. The move ends with a hard grass-cutting shot into the gaping Inter net, and the San Siro erupts with an ear-ringing roar. It is AC Milan’s 97th derby win, now 10 more than Inter. Gate receipts are around 1.4 million Euros. The worldwide TV audience runs into tens of millions. It wasn’t always thus.

In the very last days of the final year of the 19th century, a small group of enthusiasts met one evening to establish the Milan Cricket and Football Club. Most football historians quote the date as December 16 1899, but in reality, the original document of the club ‘s founding statute was lost, so the gathering could have been any time between the ninth and the 17th of the month. There is also doubt over its location. Some accounts refer to the Hotel du Nord in Piazza Repubblica, others locate it at the nearby Bar Fiaschetteria in Via Berchet, which certainly became the regular meeting place. No exact figures exist for the number in attendance.

But what is not in doubt is the club’s English roots. Half a dozen English names featured in the association’s original membership and the driving force behind that inaugural meeting of what would later become the mighty Associazone Calcio Milan – AC Milan – was an English textile worker, one Herbert Kilpin.

A keen striker, Kilpin, - the 29 years old son of a Nottingham butcher – was the team’s first captain, its first club president being one Alfred Edwards. So it was that the final letter “o” was dropped from Milano to adopt the English spelling. The club’s original pitch was on the site of what is now Stazione Centrale, Milan’s main railway station, a huge marble masterpiece of Italy’s Fascist era of public works in the 20’s and 1930’s.

But the history of the Milan derby is the history of a sporting divorce. The two parties separated over a point of principle without ever coming to blows, then ended up sharing the same home without ever quite kissing and making up. They are football’s odd couple.

The separation came just a little over eight years after that original gathering. A splinter group led by artist Giorgio Muggiani, broke away because it wanted to permit foreigners to play for the side, contrary to Federation regulations. On March 08th 1908, a group of likeminded rebels gathered together at the L’Orlogio restaurant in Via Orefici just a goalkeeper’s kick away from the city’s famous landmark, the giant Duomo cathedral. And thus was born Internazionale Milano, the new name proudly reflecting the reasons for the divorce. “The colours they chose for their new kits reflected these early romantic leanings,” says Fabio Monti, Inter’s expert at the Milan-based Il Corriere della Sera, Italy’s leading daily newspaper. “The black was to represent the night, blue for the sky.” It was an idealistic gesture towards the nascent internationalism of the turbulent European politics of the early 20th century. Ironically, after winning their first scudetto – (literally, “little shield”) – in 1910, Inter’s first captain Virgilio Fossati was himself to fall victim of the nationalistic carnage of World War I. Meanwhile, the design of the club crest produced by those artistic founders is today ridiculed by Interisti as illegible.

Italian football fans are notoriously superstitious. And the birth of Inter produced what must be one of the most eerie ghosts at any football feast. Barbara Ballardini, 29, who compiled an entire academic thesis on the fans of Inter and Milan, explains: “Historically, AC Milan have experienced a lot of ups and downs, with long periods without winning anything. Before the schism that created Inter, they had already won three Scudetti with the latest coming the year before the breakaway. But then, they entered their longest ever barren period. AC Milan had to wait another 44 years before they won their next Scudetto. And that inaugural Inter meeting was attended by 44 founding members.” Woo spooky.

For many years, the Internazionale splitters were dismissed as a bunch of upper-class intellectuals, while AC Milan remained associated more with the working classes. Indeed, Milanese dialect gave early nicknames of Cascivit for Milan and Bauscia for Inter – roughly translated as “spanners” and braggers”. But these original socio-economic differences are now well outdated. A recent survey also found little difference between the fans’ political affiliations, with the traditionally left-leaning Milan fans shifting toward the centre sine the arrival in 1986 of club president Silvio Berlusconi, the media billionaire and current Prime Minister of Italy’s centre right governing coalition. Like the rest of Italy, club nicknames derive from team colours, hence Nerazzuri (black-blues) for Inter, and Rossoneri for Milan’s red-and-black.

The first meeting of the two Milan formations was, perhaps uniquely in the history of footballing derbies, not actually staged in the home city – nor even in the country. The two sides came head to head on a football pitch for the first time in Chiasso, some 50 miles north of Milan, just over the border of Switzerland. “Nobody really knows why,” admits Fabio Monti. And if the affable Monti doesn’t know, you suspect nobody does.

The result of the match, reported at the time as a “Chiasso Cup” tie was a 2-1 victory for the Milan Football and Cricket Club. Goalscorer Lana, Milan’s number seven, went on to score the Italian national side’s first ever goal two years later.

The renegade Inter’s early history was peripatetic, shifting from one location to another until 1930 when they settled at the roofless Arena stadium just outside the city’s inner ring of ancient gates which date back before Napoleon. Evocative of an ancient Roman amphitheatre, the Arena still hosts Serie D games.

Meanwhile Milan, with the big money backing of the Pirelli tyre manufacturing family – nowadays one of Inter’s main sponsors – built a stadium on the then city periphery, in the San Siro area, in 1926. They sold it to the city authorities in 1935. And enlarged version was inaugurated in 1939 with a 2-2 draw against England in a friendly international, just four months before the outbreak of World War II. In Italy, not even global conflagrations tend to stop football matches, and the following year, Inter obtained permission to shift their title-winning end-of season fixture against Bologna to the larger San Siro to accommodate the crowds.

The odd couple were back living under the same roof. Or at least Inter had cheekily brought its toothbrush to stay the night. The domestic arrangement was to be made permanent from 1947.

“Yes, it’s a peculiar history,” admits Barbara Ballardini, the thesis-writing Rossonera. “Two huge teams with huge fan bases that share the same ground don’t really have any strong ties to any particular part of the city. They are devoid of religious or political rivalries, save for the 70’s when some ultras groupings reflected the violent political environment in Italy at the time.”

But one of the most curious features of Milanese football culture is that nobody can explain why they chose one team or the other. “As a little girl, I just always liked wearing red. I’d dress up as a Milanista at carnival,” laughs Barbara Ballardini. It’s about as good a response you can get. When asked by a sociological survey whey they chose Inter, one third quoted family allegiance. Yet an astonishing18 percent said they couldn’t remember. Thirty-five year-old financial advisor Andrea di Cola is an Inter season-ticket holder: “When I was a kid they were a legendary club. Now, even tough we haven’t won anything for years, I like the fans. They are notoriously critical, yes, but there is a lot of self-irony in it all. It’s good fun.”

The derby’s passion on the pitch comes without the surrounding air of menace sometimes associated with such confrontations. “There certainly isn’t the aggression that you get back home,” says Linda McCanna, a 30-year-old Manchester United fan from Cheshire, now living in Italy with Massimo, her AC Milan season-ticket-holding boyfriend. “If a City fan – or a Liverpool fan, for that matter – wandered into a United pub, they’d be likely to find a bit of bother, especially on a matchday. Here, they sing songs against each other at the match, but then afterwards they’re in the bar sharing a drink. They know each other, work in the same places, live in the same areas.”

Perhaps, surprisingly, the absence of violence also derives from the network of ultras. “There did used to be trouble between the opposing ultras,” Barbara Ballardini explains. “But back in 1983, when a particularly nasty derby confrontation outside the San Siro got out of hand – an Inter fan died – the ultra leaders got together and agreed a kind of non-belligerence pact between themselves.” It has held to this day.

“I’d say, if anything, Milan fans dislike Inter more than they dislike us,” admits Max, a Rossonero, season-ticket-holder. “We have to share “our” stadium with them, and we’ve won more than they have. The Milan curva sud sings songs against Inter at every game, not only when we are playing against them.” The chant “July and August” ridicules Interisti pre-season boasting which often comes to nothing by season’s end. Given Inter’s lack of a Scudetto since 1989, it hits home. “But they seem more bothered about beating Juve,” says Max. “At least that’s what they pretend.”

“It is true. For Inter the derby is a very important game. But historically, it’s against Juventus that feelings ran highest, “says no less an authority than Mario Corso, legendary left-winger of the “Grande Inter” side that swept all before them in the early 60’s. Under coach Helenio Herrera, regarded as the inventor of the notorious catenaccio defensive style, Inter won four Scudetti, two European Cups and two Intercontinental Cups.

Corso, who notched up 414 league appearances for Inter, recalls: “In 65, we won 2-0 and overtook Milan to win the league. And I scored. That is a special memory. But against Juve, there was an angry feeling, it always felt worse being beaten by Juve. It was almost a derby.” Indeed, the Juventus-Internazionale fixture is classically known as il derby d’Italia, being the only ever-present Serie A fixture and because of the Inter and Juventus supporters spread around the country. But across town, at Milan club headquarters in Via Turati, Cesare Maldini, whose captaincy included lifting the European Cup at Wembley after defeating Benfica 2-1 in 1963, dismiss any suggestion that Milan’s city is anything less than a charged-up affair. “No, no, the players really felt it, recalls the ex-Rossonero leader, and father of current captain Paolo.

“The derby was always the most important game – it meant being supreme, for the fans to say they were the top team in the city, for a few months. When Milan won 6-0 a couple of years ago, and at “their place” too, he chuckles, “it was a terrific shock. It really meant something.” From his own playing days, he can’t pick out one particular derby game, “but in those days the winning fans would go out celebrating in the streets, and carry mock funeral wreaths to the other club. Admittedly, you don’t see that any more.”

The lack of animosity between the clubs increasingly extends to the transfer of players. Last season saw Dutch midfielder Clarence Seedorf, Croatian defender, Dario Simic and much talked about trequartista (playmaker), Andrea Pirlo the year before along with midfielder Christian Brocchi. “I could have never changed from nerazzuro to Milan, no never,” affirms the 61 year-old Corso. “I had the opportunity,” reveals Maldini senior, “back before Paolo was born. Moratti (Angelo, the father of current Inter president, Massimo) wanted me but it didn’t come off. In those days, it was almost unthinkable to change colours. The players had certain bars and places we went to. Really, it was an unthinkable.” But Alberto Costa, Milan correspondent at the Corriere della Sera, insists switching shirts is not a modern phenomenon.

“There are precedents. When Mila were relegated to Serie B in 1982 they were in a very bad way financially. Inter helped them out by lending three players, Aldo Serena, Canuti, and Pasinato. They came straight backup into Serie A.” A modern echo of that camaraderie came last November. Inter’s Christian Vieri sent a congratulatory text message to Andriy Shevchenko when the back-from injury Milan striker scored the vital Champions League winner against Real Madrid. A week later, the gesture was reciprocated when “Bobo” Vieri himself ended a goal drought by blasting all four against Brescia.

The Corriere della Sera man sums up the relations between the Milan giants: “On the pitch, between the players, there is a great rivalry. But it’s very, let’s say, very “English”: it’s hard competition between professionals, it means a lot, but it’s all done with fair play.” He makes a telling point: “When they changed the name of the San Siro it wasn’t by accident that they renamed it Guiseppe Meazza stadium.” Meazza was an Inter hero whose career spanned 20 years until 1947, scoring 283 goals in 408 matches. “But he actually played the last two seasons of his career with the Rossoneri,” says Costa. “He represents both clubs.” The new San Siro museum has memorabilia and trophies of both teams exhibited together.

The derby may well serve to emphasise the original closeness of the Milanese clubs, but it also points up the peculiar differences in club “culture”. The old declination of working class reds and aristocratic blues may be long gone. But Inter still hang to that old patina of prestige, the first of the two to win the yellow star. Nowadays, however, without a title win since 1989, it is an illustrious history that weights ever heavier. “Two different realities”, is how the two institutions are summed up by Federica Zangalli, whose role as a football reporter for TeleLombardia, the leading regional TV station, gives her a unique insight. “As a club, Inter are still very much run like a family firm, dominated by Massimo Moratti. He is a fan, he the loves the club. There is no “wall” dividing the owner from the management who run the club, the team. If he sees a player he likes, he buys him.” This is why only Inter could have tolerated for so long the Ronaldo saga. Juventus, for example, would have cut their losses and offloaded the troublesome star much sooner, as they did with Zidane. “Moratti is a lovely man, a romantic, which football needs. But perhaps he is too nice a person for this modern business of football.”

The arrival of Berlusconi in 1986 revolutionised Milan. They are now run like a multi-national company. Unlike Inter, everyone knows their specific role and little things don’t blow up into great big problems.” The enormous Berlusconi-era successes- six Serie A titles, three European Cups, three European Super Cups and two Intercontinental Cups – reversed the imbalance in silverware with their neighbours.

“Whereas at Milan there’s an upbeat approach, at Inter, there is this culture of suffering,” observes Zangalli. “It is almost as though it’s in their DNA to suffer. The more they miss out on winning something, the more anxious they become, the fans, the club, so the more pressure there is to win something. It’s a classic vicious circle.”

But former player Corso denies Inter’s is a culture of pessimism. “There is a lot of irony, very self-deprecating. It’s always been like that.” It is perhaps no coincidence that many comics and literary figures are numbered amongst Inter’s celebrity fans. Away from the ultra-dominated curva, Inter supporters in the costlier seats are notoriously the most impatient in Serie A. “Yes, it’s true, they are very negative,” says Fabio Monti, Il Corriere’s Inter-watcher. If at half-time, they are not winning, they start to whistle against their own players every time they make a mistake.” Zangalli agrees: “That, of course, makes the players nervous still. Several players have moved from Inter to Milan in recent seasons, and they all notice the difference arriving at AC.” Is it just that success breeds success so the Milanisti are more relaxed and patient? “No, Inter fans have always been like that,” bemoans Monti. “Even before the barren period, they were always more negative, more critical of their side. Perhaps it comes from having such great expectations because of their history, it’s difficult to say,” he admits with an exasperated shake of the head.

Milan and Inter, the odd couple indeed. If AC are now the laid-back slightly devilish Walter Matthau, then Inter are the neurotic Jack Lemmon, trying too hard and beset by self-doubt. Simplistically speaking, AC Milan’s game classically is founded on a patient passing approach, dubbed by detractors as gioco orrizontale, - the square ball. Inter’s is traditionally built around one outstanding world-beater – Sandro Mazzola in the 1960’s, Ronaldo in the late 90’sm Vieri now – exploiting the gioco verticale, the direct long ball. Peppino Prisco, the rascally former Inter vice-president, once defended the team’s style by referring to the famous 1949 derby victory: “square ball five, long ball six.”

Milan sold over 53,000 season tickets for this current season. Inter, despite not having lifted that championship shield since 1989, and despite having inexplicably thrown it away by losing to Lazio on the very last day of last season, sold only a shade fewer. The odd couple look destined to share domestic life for some time yet.

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #82 of 1477 (permalink) Old February 10th, 2003, 13:25
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great stories people

Forza Juve!
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post #83 of 1477 (permalink) Old February 28th, 2003, 02:08 Thread Starter
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Here comes some more! From the February issue of Forza Milan!, the narration of one of the greatest gamse in the Milan history, a famous Juventus-Milan which ended 7-1 for Milan in Torino, related by the legendary Carlo Pellegatti and translated from Italian to English by yours truly, aka me. Enjoy!

FORZA CARLO!!!
FORZA MAGICO MILAN!!!


The year 1950 grants Milan with an historic win, in Turin, led by the Swedish Trio Gre-No-Li, the great protagonists. The victim is Juventus, thumped 7-1, at home, and above all their midfielder, Parola, sent off after kicking Nordhal. An ugly episode of the game, that however, would not compromise their friendship.

By Carlo Pellegatti.

An historic and unforgettable date, this far, very far day of 05 February 1950. The Milan of the Legendary Swedish Trio of Gre-No-Li beats Juventus 7-1 at the Stadio Comunale (Torino), thanks to a hat-trick from Nordhal and goals from Liedholm, Gren, Burini and Candiani. It's also in that day was born the Great Milan of the Swedish, that during the following season, would win, the fourth Scudetto of the History of the club, after a 44 years wait since the last title. Before starting relating that unforgettable game, let us spend some time understanding who were Gunnar Nordhal, Gunnar Gren and Nils Liedholm, the fantastic Swedish Trio, that the President Umberto Trabattoni wanted at all cost in his project for Milan, a project that would make the team win the Scudetto within a short period, the Scudetto, that the Rossoneri would win the following season.

The first to join Milan is Gunnar Nordhal, in 1949, a centre forward of a rare physical strength, devastating, who had just won, the year before, the London Olimpic games, with his National Team. And it is also Nordhal, that after the insistence of the Milan president, convinced his two other compatriots, Liedholm and Gren, to sign for the club. It is around these three, that team manager, Toni Busini, is trying to build a competitive team, whose bench was allocated to Lajos Czeizler and with a great champion in the net such as Lorenzo Buffon.

Gunnar Nordhal is among the strongest centre forwards ever seen in Italy. Legend has it that once, an opponent held his jersey in an desperate attempt to stop him, but he was simply pulled by Nordhal for over a good ten metres before finally scoring a goal. So powerful physically, yet such a fair play player. As a matter of fact, he was sent off only once, in Palermo, in 1952. His opponent Garioli, bruttalized him throughout the game until, at one time, the Swedish forward yelled at him to stop. The ref, being nearby, warned Nordhal to be careful with what he's saying, and the Milan forward asks the ref:"But can't you see that he's been continuously bruttalizing me throughout the game?". The answer of the ref, was a very harsh red card to the Swede, which caused the furious reaction of Gunnar Gren who broke everything in his path in the dressing room: lamps, doors, etc.. To this day, the Swedish forward still holds the record of goals for Milan in Serie A: 210 goals, an incredible amount scored in only 257 games, which will probably never be equaled.

If Nordhal is the strength, the power, Gunnar Gren is the class. When he arrived in Italy, he was already a mature player, at 29 years old. He was nicknamed "il Professore" (the Professor) as he was literally teaching football to his teammates, who were simply mesmerized by his stylistish prowesses. He was the only one able to juggle with the ball with the ball touching the ground, with both his head and feet three lapses around the San Siro. He could use with the same efficiency and ease either his right or left foot: a genius technically, but always at the service and disposal of the team.

Nils Liedholm is the youngest of the three. Tall and strong, typical of athletes from the North, he can invent a play at any given moment. He still holds an amazing record: he has never been yellow-carded. In those years, Milan will acquire their main characteristic: style and elegance, traits that will distinguish them for ever from then on.

Let us get back to that winter day of 1950. The Rossoneri only have one great opponent in that season, Juventus. And the rivalry was even more intense for the Gre-No-Li. Indeed, as the Scudetto was fought by two different schools of football, the Swedish one of Milan against the Danish of Turin, the great Hansen and Praest. Milan has been lately in great form: in the past 12 games that followed that astonishing 6-5 defeat to Inter, Czeizler's men went on to hot streak where they won 10 games, losing only once, in Roma against Roma and tieing 0-0 against Triestina, who were coached by a certain Nereo Rocco. The Milan attack has been in an extraordinary form: they scored 39 goal, bombarding the opposing defences with goals from everywhere. Among them, a 4-1 win against Fiorentina, a 5-0 against Genoa, an astonishing 9-1, at the San Siro against Bari, another 5 against Sampdoria, 4 to Como and 2 to the "lucky" Venezia.

It's the 4th day of the return games in the league. Juventus, strong with the presence of keeper Viola and of Piccinini (the father of the famous tv commentator of the tv show, "Controcampo"), Muccinelli, Parola and Boniperti, have a 3 pts lead over Milan in the Serie A standings. After a few minutes, the Torinesi take the lead thanks the Dane John Hansen, but within 26 minutes, reverses the situation and the first half ends with a 4-1 score for the Rossoneri, thanks to goals from Nordhal, Gren, Liedholm and Nordhal again. In the second half, Nordhal, Burini and Candiani seal the triumph with an emphatic and commanding 7-1 score, in Turin.

Let us allow Gunnar Nordhal, whom, in his autobiography "Oro e Campi Verdi" (literally Gold and Green Fields), has commented on that game. "This was the chef d'oeuvre, of the Gre-No-Li. The field was all wet due to the constant raining, our preferred type of field, and Juve were literally destroyed by our attacks. Everyone of us surpassed and transcended our performance in that game in which we came close to perfection in the play. It would be well worth the effort to do a cinematographic remake of that game in its entirety, a game which was a true benchmark of class, and the consecration of Gren's out of this world technical abilities and the sizzling accelerations of Liedholm.

In his memoires, Nordhal also remembers, another episode of that game. When the Juve defender, Parola, who was marking him during the game, loses his cool and literally kicks the Milan forward, causing the Juve player for an early shower. "He couldn't it - wrote Nordhal - because I know him and his character, which was a good and loyal guy, and I knew that this was mainly due to the pressure of the game. In the dressing rooms, we shook hands and to this day, we see each other with pleasure."

The reason of that great friendship is known to few people. It was in fact, Carlo Parola, that Gunnar had known during a friendly match with the Rest of the World in Glasgow, to ask him, for the first time:" Why don't you come to Italy"? The two met again, a few months later, where the team of Nordhal, Norkoeping, played on a cold Turin afternoon, Juventus. "The fable of my long Italian journey - recalls the Swede - really started after that phrase, that Parola said to me, in a snowy afternoon, in Turin".

Juventus - Milan 1-7
Turin, Sunday 05 February 1950.
Juventus: Viola, Bertucelli, Manente, Mari, Piccinini, Muccinelli, Martino, Boniperti, J. Hansen, Praest.
Coach: Carver.
Milan: Buffon, Belloni, Foglia, Annovazzi, Tognon, Bonomi, Burini, Gren, Nordhal, Liedholm, Candiani II.
Coach: Czeizler.
Goal scorers: J. Hansen 2' (Juve); Nordhal 15th, 26th, 49th; Gren 23rd, Liedholm 24th; Burini 70th; Candiani II 84th.
Referee: Galeati.

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #84 of 1477 (permalink) Old March 23rd, 2003, 06:13 Thread Starter
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Some of the recent milestones reached by San Paolo:

- 120 games in European competitions so far and counting... (previous record was held by Inter's Giuseppe Bergomi with 118 games in Europe!).

- reached the 500 games plateau in Serie A.
- equalled the record of Gianni Rivera of 501 Serie A games with Milan against Juventus tonight).
- 501 Serie A games and counting...the all-time record being held by Dino Zoff with 570 games. (more or less 2 more seasons and it will also be San Paolo's!!!).

Here's the all time list:

1. Dino Zoff 20 1961-83 570
2. Pietro Vierchowod 19 1980-2000 562
3. Roberto Mancini 18 1981-2000 541
4. Silvio Piola 21 1929-54 537
5. Enrico Albertosi 21 1958-80 532
6. Gianni Rivera 21 1959-79 527
7. Giuseppe Bergomi 19 1980-99 519
8. Giovanni Galli 18 1977-95 496
9. Tarcisio Burgnich 19 1958-76 494
10. Giancarlo De Sisti 19 1960-79 478
11. Giacinto Facchetti 18 1960-78 476
11. Paolo Maldini 17 1984-2002 476*
13. Franco Baresi 18 1977-97 474
14. Pietro Ferraris II 18 1929-50 470
15. Sergio Cervato 16 1948-64 466
16. Gianluca Pagliuca 16 1986-2002 463*
17. Franco Causio 18 1967-86 460
18. Jose Altafini 18 1958-76 459
19. Ciro Ferrara 18 1984-2002 454*
20. Giampiero Boniperti 15 1946-61 444
21. Mario Corso 16 1958-74 436
22. Giacomo Mari 14 1946-60 426
23. Franco Janich 16 1956-72 425
24. Amedeo Amadei 16 1936-56 423
25. Sandro Mazzola 17 1960-77 417
26. Cesare Maldini 15 1952-67 412
27. Teobaldo Depetrini 18 1930-51 410
28. Lido Vieri 17 1958-76 409
29. Sergio Santarini 16 1967-83 406
30. Giorgio Ferrini 15 1960-75 405
30. Giuseppe Savoldi 15 1965-80 405
30. Sandro Salvadore 16 1958-74 405
33. Mauro Tassotti 17 1978-97 404
34. Lucidio Sentimenti IV15 1938-59 403
34. Luciano Castellini 15 1970-85 403
34. Romano Fogli 16 1955-71 403
37. Diego Fuser 17 1985-02 402*
38. Gino Armano 13 1946-59 401
38. Carlo Reguzzoni 15 1929-48 401
38. Paolino Pulici 17 1968-85 401
41. Kurt Hamrin 15 1956-71 400
Roberto Baggio 17 1985-02


FORZA SAN PAOLO!!!!

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #85 of 1477 (permalink) Old March 28th, 2003, 23:48 Thread Starter
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A great article on San Paolo on the March issue of Forza Milan!. This article is where Paolo talks about the games in Serie A that has impacted him the most. Enjoy is all I can say as it is very very informative!

FORZA SAN PAOLO!!!

Paolo Maldini

The ten games in Serie A that have left the most intense memories and feelings: from the debut in Udine to the UEFA play-off match against Sampdoria; from the triumph in Napoli to the Derby of the 6-0. But also some of the worst games. 10 games plus his debut. 11 in total. 11 games in Serie A that will remain for ever in San Paolo's mind.

By Luca Seraffini.

We have simply lost count of his celebrations, of the records that have been falling one after the other, but Paolo Maldini is always looking ahead. If one asks him to look back in the past, he always does it with great attention and respect towards the past, recalling annecdotes and lessons learnt at that time that could still be useful today and in the future, for him and for others. Very soon, it will be 500 games in the league, his physic is still integre, his will intact, the rossonero jersey again shinning like the first one in 1986. Chosing the 10 games, maybe not the most beautiful but the most significative is not easy: here we are talking about different eras: the first part with Liedholm at his debut and then the succession of Capello, then Sacchi and then, again Capello without forgetting Tabarez and the two difficult come-backs, the sweet feeling of being coached by papa Cesare until the new day, with the reassuring face of Carlo Ancelotti. But let us the captain do the talking.

23 May, 1987: Milan-Sampdoria 1-0 played on neutral grounds at the Stadio Communale of Torino.

"A game that will be remembered for two important reasons. The first one is that after a few years on the down side, finally Milan managed to win a decisive match and in the same occasion, reaching an imprtant target. European qualification was fondamental for the new era under Berlusconi, who had been in place for a little bit more than a year. We prepared for this game in an extraordinary way, it was a tough and balanced match. The second reason that made this game very important was that Fabio Capello, at that time coach of the first team after having been in charge of the Primavera team (youth team), convinced everyone that he could very well coach at this level. After that season and for the following 4 years, he went to be a manager for Mediolanum and then, became the successor of Sacchi and I have always believed that this win against Sampdoria was the starting point for him.

25 October 1987: Verona-Milan 0-1

We had adhered to the Sacchi project with great enthusiasm. I will never forget that he had called me in June, during my holidays making me stop my cruise on my boat and holding me on the phone in the hall of the hotel for more than an hour in my bathing suit. He was a maniac but he taught us many things that we have never forgotten. He was on the verge of being fired; we were playing well but the results were not coming and we had suffered an unexpected elimination from the UEFA Cup that we had qualified for with much trouble and difficulty. The winning goal scored by Virdis was a kind of liberation, which allowed us to play in a liberated way and thus saving Sacchi from a possible firing. Had this happened, we may have probably never seen the stellar squad of the following 4 years. This day was also the day when my friend Billy Costacurta made his debut in Serie A and this also a nice memory.


1 May 1988: Napoli-Milan 2-3

How much meaning and weight can I give to this photo on my album? Infinitely. It was the crowning of an interminable race, a run perhaps never seen in the whole history of the Serie A eventough there has been lots of other cases where a team has won the scudetto at the last minute. We won in a stadium in disbelief, where all the spectators were given us a standing ovation at the end of the match. We had beaten the defending champions of Italy with the great Diego Maradona, the opponent that I have admired the most in my career. During those 90 minutes, there was the sum of everything and all the qualities that would allow us later on to win it all: 1 Scudetto, 2 Champions Cups, 2 Intercontinental Cups, Italian and European Super Cups. We would have probably not obtained a good result that day in any other way than through an offensive and spectacular style and not with defensive or speculative methods.


22 April 1990: Verona-Milan 2-1

I am not talking of a conspiracy or anything else, but certainly that match is one of the biggest injustices I have faced in my career. It was the year where the title was won in the last day by Napoli in front of us. We were denied an absolutely obvious penalty, but to be honest, we lost our cool and our heads: we were very tired and nervous that day, we had Van Basten, Rijkaard, Costacurta and Sacchi sent off. We lost a title that we should have probably won. To compensate the loss of the Scudetto, a few weeks later, we won a splendid Champions Cup. The responsability of that incredible loss was probably ours in big part, but Rosario Lo Bello (the ref of that Verona-Milan) has had his fair share in it which were not negligeable.

His debut: an unforgettable memory. Ten games plus one: in Paolo Maldini's gallery, it simply couldn't be without his debut in the league, which occured in the beginning of 1985, away from Milano covered by snow. But let us San Paolo tell us how it went:

20 January 1985: Udinese-Milan 1-1

Impossible forgetting that match. So many memories are tied with with Liedholm on this match! A truly Great, with his exceptional sense of humour he was able to put everyone at ease and able to make every one see the bright side of any situation. For exemple, that afternoon, at Udine, I was very stressed. Half an hour before the kick-off, in the dressing room, he came to see me and asked me:"Where do you want to play?". Yes you heard it!The Maestro was asking the debuting 16 year old kid where he preferred to play! Speaking about that today makes me laugh. However that day, fear and stress dominated my sense of humour. Nonetheless that question by Il Barone gave me the vital serenity I needed during the match.

4 October 1992: Fiorentina-Milan 3-7

The Viola were just behind us in the standings prior to this match. Had we lost that game, they would surpassed us in the top of the Serie A table. I regret that after that loss, they were not able to get back their old level and as a result of that free-fall, they were relegated to Serie B at the end of the season at the surprise of everyone. Fiorentina took the lead early on with Baiano, a mistake from our defence but our answer was devastating. Also at the end of that match, we left the stadium with a standing ovation by the Viola faithful and this for a footballer is one of the most gratifying and incredible satisfaction. This is the match from the Capello times that comes to mind right away, along with an 8-2 in Foggia at the very last day of the season. This 3-7 propulsated us towards the second consecutive Scudetto and proved definitely wrong all those we were suggesting that Capello's Milan were more a cynical and efficient team and not spectacular.

1 December 1996:Piacenza-Milan 3-2

The Sacchi and Capello eras had just finished, we had a squad which was not used to losing. In the negative moments we were lacking a kind of stability. I am sad that after that match, our coach Oscar Tabarez was sacked. He was a good person, very serious and good coach. He had to pay for everyone as it is unfortunately the case in football for coaches, even for faults that were not his. In reality, he had positive ideas that with time could have pay off. Three days later, we had a Champions League match in which we only needed a tie to advance to the 1/4 finals. Sacchi was recalled and the team was a little bit lost. We lost at home against Rosenborg. At the end of the match, we faced a heavy contestation from the fans and at the end of the season, the return of Sacchi turned out not to be a good solution. Thus, after Liedholm in 1987, almost 10 years later, we faced another sacking of the coach.

6 April 1997: Milan-Juventus 1-6

A tragic night, the lowest point ever in my career in Serie A. I don't believe there's any need to add a lot here. The memory of the game is enough and it has to be used to make sure to avoid at all costs to repeat in the future, a defeat such dimension.


[/u]11 April 1999: Milan-Parma 2-1[/u]

No, no, it's not because of my goal. But to be honest, a goal like that, in my career I had never scored one: a bullet shot from long range right into the top left corner. The importance of the game was very big: it was the first of the 7 consecutive wins that allowed us to win the Scudetto. Everyone was saying that it was all done, that the Scudetto would have been won by Lazio. During that Parma-Milan game, we were trailing them but Ganz completed the come-back. Maurizio scored that season some highly decisive goals, in particular in Piacenza and at home against Sampdoria. They were also saying that this Milan was not playing in a spectacular way whereas the forwards, Bierhoff, Weah, Leonardo and Ganz had scored between themselves almost 50 goals.


23 May 1999: Perugia-Milan 1-2

How many times have I heard that the Old Guard is finished, done, past it and that a rebuilding process was needed? Because of that, Seba Rossi, Demetrio, Billy, Boban and I felt, let us say, this Scudetto to be more, "ours". The last Scudetto was the most difficult of all, the least expected eventough Zaccheroni has had the merits to believe in it since the first day of summer training camp. After having browsed rapidly through the newspapers that first day, in the evening, he came in our rooms with the newspapers and told us all: "look, there is no one that put us among the favorites." The finale run was amazing: we won on the road in Torino, Vicenza, Udine and Perugia. I'm dissappointed that amng some of our opponents that we had beaten that year they did not have fair play comments. However, the celebrations were unforgettable. We deserved the win and that match (against Perugia) was a battle of nerves.

11 May 2001: Inter-Milan 0-6

A match that has entered into the legend: the biggest home loss in the history of the Nerazzuri, as a matter of fact, against us! After the 4th goal, San Siro was starting to empty and only our tifosi were remaining that deserved a nice satisfaction after period of disappointments and delusions that had led to Zaccheroni's sacking. Yes, my father was the coach and the fact that he had his name linked with this game, for me it has been an uncomparable joy in my career. We simply destroyed them with our grinta, will, determination, desire to win, with our game and speed. If the match had lasted 4 hours, we would have continued to score, but not to hurt them: they say that hurting is not fair play. I answer to that, that we players and tifosi, we had lots of fun, in fact, we had a blast.

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #86 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 13th, 2003, 15:16 Thread Starter
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Speaking of San Paolo, here's all the derbies he's played in his career so far, courtesy of the official site Enjoy! :

TUTTI I DERBY DI PAOLO MALDINI
12/05/2003 10:51



MILANO - Ecco tutti i risultati dei derby (44 in totale, 41 in partite ufficiali) disputati dal capitano del Milan Paolo Maldini.

1985-86
Campionato: Milan-Inter 2-2 Inter-Milan 1-0

1986-87
Campionato: Milan-Inter 0-0 Inter-Milan 1-2

1987-88
Campionato: Inter-Milan 0-1 Milan-Inter 2-0

1988-89
Amichevole: Milan-Inter 0-0
Campionato: Milan-Inter 0-1 Inter-Milan 0-0

1989-90
Campionato: Inter-Milan 0-3 Milan-Inter 1-3

1990-91
Campionato: Milan-Inter 0-1 Inter-Milan 0-1

1991-92
Trofeo Luigi Berlusconi: Milan-Inter 1-0
Campionato: Inter-Milan 1-1 Milan-Inter 1-0

1992-93
Campionato: Milan-Inter 1-1 Inter-Milan 1-1
Coppa Italia: Milan-Inter 0-0 Inter-Milan 0-3

1993-94
Campionato: Inter-Milan 1-2 Milan-Inter 2-1

1994-95
Campionato: Milan-Inter 1-1 Inter-Milan 3-1
Coppa Italia: Milan-Inter 1-2

1995-96
Campionato: Inter-Milan 1-1 Milan-Inter 0-1

1996-97
Campionato: Milan-Inter 1-1

1997-98
Campionato: Milan-Inter 0-3
Coppa Italia: Milan-Inter 5-0 Inter-Milan 1-0

1998-99
Campionato: Milan-Inter 2-2 Inter-Milan 2-2

1999-2000
Campionato: Inter-Milan 1-2 Milan-Inter 1-2
Coppa Italia: Milan-Inter 2-3 Inter-Milan 1-1

2000-2001
Campionato: Milan-Inter 2-2 Inter-Milan 0-6

2001-2002
Campionato: Inter-Milan 2-4

2002-2003
Amichevole: Milan-Inter 1-0
Campionato: Milan-Inter 1-0 Inter-Milan 0-1
Champions League: Milan-Inter 0-0

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #87 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2003, 01:04 Thread Starter
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Milan, and the Champions Cup, a Great Story and Tradition.

The month of May has been synonymous of celebrations for all, but importantly for Milan. Indeed, the month of May represent a month full of meaning with not only important dates of the past to remember but also and most importantly, an habit if not a duty to write even more glorious days in the present and the future. The Milan official site has been devoted the last couple of days to rememorate those days.

It started yesterday, May 22, 2003, with the 40th anniversary of the first Champions Cup won by Milan in Wembley against Benfica which article I have taken the time to translate to English as it is well worth the read for all the Milanisti. Today, May 23, it is celebrated as it is on a May 23 that Sacchi's Milan confirmed their superiority and imposed their stamp in football history as one of the greatest and most dominant club teams of all time, if not the greatest of all, yet again against Benfica in Vienna. Yesterday, in the official site, there was a big photo of the 1963 team in the first page. For those who have missed it, I am attaching it to this post.

In the next few days, these celebrations will continue to rememorate our glorious past with posts and pics about those who have contributed to make Milan what Milan are today. Now, it's the 2002-2003 Milan's turn to write another of such a glorious page, in the long and proud Milan History Book by matching the achievement of their legendary and triumphant predecesors.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!!!

22 May 1963: The Heart Still Beats

Milano - Milan's heart still beats. Important impulses, regular pulsations of the heart. Fourty years since the first triumph of an Italian team in the Champions Cup, Milan is still yet again in the finale. Not only that: it's in England yet again, the land of the foundator of Milan, Herbert Kilpin, yet again, with a Maldini as captain. To guard Eusebio, there was Cesarone; today to face Del Piero, there will be Paolo. Not Paolino. This was the youngster of 1985, of his debut of career, of the first steps in Italy, Europe and around the world. Today, it's Super Paolo, the father of two beautiful children and of so many football memories.

Paolo after Cesare, Old Trafford after Wembley: a short cut possible of some of the most historical and unique as the Rossonera History. Speaking of Maldini, today, the fourtieeth anniversary of the Wembley triumph against mighty Benfica, here's Cesarone Maldini's comments:"We have been the first, even to this day, I have a very vivid memory of this finale. But the amazing thing is that fourty years later, is that there's still a Maldini captain. This thing, on top of the passion and enormous bond I feel and I have towards Milan, make me very confident about our chances in the finale in Manchester."

The current head of the scouts of Milan, brillant protagonist as a coach of the end of the 2001 season, continues to share some of his memories of what, eventough later became part of History as the Magical night of Wembley, was in fact an afternoon filled with glory. "We were not the favorites, however, in all the previous matches of the Champions Cup that year (1963), we had played well, we had a very technical team, a true team every sense. We played against an extremely strong who had just eliminated both Barcelona and Real Madrid, which were at the time, teams filled with true legends of football." At the end, Milan managed to beat Benfica, coming from behind and for Captain Maldini and his teammates, receiving the well-deserved bonus from the club: "14 Million Lire each?No, 14 Million in total. I don't want to be wrong, but I believe we received each a bonus of about 700-800 thousand Lire. I was able to buy a Fiat with the victory in this finale."

The coach of the first Milan Champions of Europe was the legendary and much beloved Paròn Rocco, for whom Cesare Maldini has always had a high esteem: "I will always remember him. Each time that there's a discussion about football of the past and that we talk about anecdotes of the past, he always appears on the discussions. In any moment. He will be present in our minds. Not only at Milan, but also in Trieste (his city of origin). Each year, they hold ceremonies and celebrations in his honour and memory. When he was our coach, nobody had ever spoken bad about him, nor in the dressing room, neither inside the club. This man was able, with his humour and typical traits, to live and be friends with all of us and with all the great persons at the top, such as the presidents of the club, from Rizzoli to Carraro."

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #88 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 24th, 2003, 01:12 Thread Starter
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Here are some more great anecdotes, courtesy of "giannirivera" from DM where he posted these fabulous anecdotes. Enjoy is all I can say. Many a thanks to Giannirivera!

Quote:
Originally posted by San Siro

In the meantime, in another hotel, the Milan medical staff was working hard in order to heal the foot of Ruud Gullit. Without Virdis, sent off, and "Terminator" Ancelotti, suspended for a yellow card, it was vital to recuperate at all costs Il Tulipano Nero (The Black Tulip, Gullit). The two Milan doctors, Monti and Tavana were massaging relentlessly the suffering muscles in order to have Ruud at the very least on the bench.

Hello boys and girls. What Carlo Pellegatti fails to tell here is what happened that night in the hotel where Milan squad were staying. I mean the night after the first match, suspended for low visibility, and before the legendary repeat game. A few clients called reception complaining that a large animal is running upstairs making big noise. The bell man goes upstairs and carefully watches in the corridor. The scene he sees is hilarious:
Ruud Gullit is trying a few short runs in the hotel corridors. Two men: Arrigo Sacchi and Vincenzo Pincolini carefully watching him, dubious faces and scratching their head. After each run Pincolini checkes Gullit's muscle. That was the "big animal".
Then Ruud says: "I know a man who may help us".
In the morning a private jet takes off from Linate airport: it flies to Amsterdam, to pick up a man with a suitcase. He's Ted Troost, Ruud's personal phisioterapist. He lands in Belgrad, inspects Gullit's leg and says "Thirty minutes, he can only play thirty minutes". Sacchi says: "Ok that will be enough". Ruud sits on the bench. He can do nothing but his presence gives Milan more courage. When Donadoni gets injured Ruud comes on the pitch and he'll actually play the whole second half plus extra time. The price for this will be a long absence in the season. He can't run, but he stands at midfield, he hypnotizes the jugoslavians, he shoots the free kicks.
Another thing is what happened in Milan's changing room at halftime. Donadoni on the stretcher taken unconscious to hospital two minutes earlier. His heart had stopped beating for many seconds. The boys are shocked: a few of them are pale in their face, their legs trembling. Giovanni Galli keeps his temper and starts shouting and slapping many of them on the face. Maldini is first, anedoctically Baresi gets a few slaps as well.
Later, during shootout, another situation. Milan are ahead but they have to score the final penalty. cappellini, a youngsters has to go on the ball. It's the forth and decisive shot. His a penalty specialist and Sacchi has sent him in at last minute of extratime. but he's young and his face tells all his fear. Frank Rijkard looks at him and stops him with his hand while approaching the penalty box. "I go" he says. He's not a penalty specialist but he's a real man. He goes, and he scores the winning goal.
I was on television and nearly dying. Milan was already out of Scudetto, miles away from Inter. Without that win, the great cicle would have probably not happened. Sacchi would have probably been exonerated. But we won...

And some more:

"Not really an anecdote, but a glimpse of everyday life at Milanello. Not many know that there are major differences among different tables the players use at the restaurant in MIlanello.
There is a table where the coach sits with the old guard. Obviously sits are physically restricted, and only the old guard decides who can sit at that table. Being admitted is something that requires years, and stepping in that table means that a player becomes part of the old guard, a senator.
Arrigo Sacchi recalls that, when he was MIlan coach, he came to the table, and nobody dared to sit before the coach had arrived. When he got there, he looked at Baresi and Baresi gave a nod so everyone else could sit.
This is the spirit of Milan ! "

FORZA GIANNI!!!!

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #89 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 29th, 2003, 04:45 Thread Starter
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After having freshly won our 6th Champions Cup, there are a few more milestones and records to be added in here:

First, after Cesare, 40 years ago at Wembley, now, at Old Trafford, it is Paolo. Undeniably, the name Maldini will be forever strongly tied to that of Milan!!! And watch out, Christian, eventough just 6-7 years old is already playing in the Milan youth, who knows in about 12 years...

Now, Carletto, after winning the Cup, becomes the 2nd man in history of the Champions Cup/League to have won the competition as both a player and coach with the same team. The other man to have done it is Miguel Sanchez of Real Madrid who won the Cup with Real in the late 50's several times before winning it as a coach in 66.

Finally, Clarence Seedorf is now the only player to have won the Champions Cup/League with 3 different teams. No one has achieved that before. He won it 95 with Ajax, 98 with Real and now in 2003 with Milan.

The Milan History book is getting filled constantly with new brillant chapters. FORZA MAGICO MILAN!!!!

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #90 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 29th, 2003, 04:46 Thread Starter
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Also a great dossier done by la Gazzetta dello Sport, with a retrospective of all the finals of Champions Cup/League played by both Milan and Juve in their history. Enjoy!

http://www.gazzetta.it/gazzetta/comm...hampions2003&1

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #91 of 1477 (permalink) Old May 29th, 2003, 13:58
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There may be another milestone... but this is too far-fetched.
The son of 1969 captain Gianni Rivera (Gianni Rivera Marconi) is about 5 years old
The eldest son of 1989-1990 captain Franco Baresi (he was out on 1994, ndr) Edoardo, is 11 years old now (so it's Milan or Hogwarts School of Wizardry ^-^ ) the younger, Gianandrea, is about seven or eight.

We'd say, why not? (if Rivera consented to move back to Milan from Rome, that is ^-^ )

Sixth... sixth... I can't believe it!

ps. please don't go on teasing cugini, Payman, they'll go sick, they don't deserve it! True glory and proper Milan spirit is not going on with jokes after a win (ehm)

Every energy, smile, blink, inbreath, heartbeat skip, gesture of longing in my life comes from you,Toro!

The stars are the eyes of all our beloved and departed fellow Granata, reflecting their love upon their kin... us.

Nereo Rocco, 1912-1978
FACCHETTI, PUSKAS, LIEDHOLM, MYTHS OF A LONG-LOST SOCCER

Last edited by Yuumei; May 29th, 2003 at 14:03.
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post #92 of 1477 (permalink) Old June 29th, 2003, 18:01
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milan,proud owners of 6 european cups?
6 times is unbelievable , great,extraordinary
and milan are the greatest but of course under the 9 times european champions!!!!!!!!!

EDIT as it contained unacceptable comments in this particular thread as per my warning I had given you a few days ago.

Ciao.

Last edited by San Siro; July 2nd, 2003 at 23:09.
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post #93 of 1477 (permalink) Old June 30th, 2003, 00:53
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Dear urkell:
Sour grapes, anyone?
You surely don't know that quantity and quality are not the same.
You try and get the story on many of the scudettos won by Signora. Are they the best, or are they the foul?
You choose.
Many teams know they shouldn't mess up with juve or either counting their fingers and the money on their pockets...

By the way, Italy as a team is lousy, I admit it, catenaccio ecc. But are champions designed on merit?

And what are you so pridy at? what's your call-to fame? being a sore Madridista?

I never have got sour grapes like this from fellow Milanisti, not even when things got wrong.

Yours sincerely
Yuumei-chan

Every energy, smile, blink, inbreath, heartbeat skip, gesture of longing in my life comes from you,Toro!

The stars are the eyes of all our beloved and departed fellow Granata, reflecting their love upon their kin... us.

Nereo Rocco, 1912-1978
FACCHETTI, PUSKAS, LIEDHOLM, MYTHS OF A LONG-LOST SOCCER

Last edited by Yuumei; June 30th, 2003 at 02:30.
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post #94 of 1477 (permalink) Old June 30th, 2003, 01:37 Thread Starter
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I am very much tempted to completely delete this non-sense of a post that has nothing to do in this thread at all.

Listen Urkel, I'll give you 48 hours to delete your non-sense from this thread. If you don't then, I'll delete it after the 48 hours have lapsed.

No I am not censuring you and I am not abusing my powers but this thread is about the tradition, history, prestige of Milan. There's absolutely no place for anyone in here to come and bash Milan. :fero:

Again, you have 48 hours Urkel to fix what you have done.

Ciao.

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #95 of 1477 (permalink) Old August 14th, 2003, 21:48
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I dont understand one thing why milan fans are so proud of beating bayern in the league.they just beat bayern because of bayerns bad form at that moment.if one or two matches decide which team is better then i still remember milans humiliating defeat to empoli.now does that mean empoli is better.and also all the fans of other teams think bayern is a great team.which we are.some even saay bayern could be the best team in the world but the milan fans on the other hand are so proud.they think bayern aint good.now what do i take that as jelousy or some thing.i admit milan are the european champions but milan aint the first team to win the european championship.

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post #96 of 1477 (permalink) Old August 15th, 2003, 13:41
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Quote:
Originally posted by daudzai
I dont understand one thing why milan fans are so proud of beating bayern in the league.they just beat bayern because of bayerns bad form at that moment.if one or two matches decide which team is better then i still remember milans humiliating defeat to empoli.now does that mean empoli is better.and also all the fans of other teams think bayern is a great team.which we are.some even saay bayern could be the best team in the world but the milan fans on the other hand are so proud.they think bayern aint good.now what do i take that as jelousy or some thing.i admit milan are the european champions but milan aint the first team to win the european championship.

First of all this thread is for Milan fans by Milan fans. You should kindly read Payman's (San Siro) opening post where he describes the meaning of this thread. I will just reply to you to clarify some misunderstanding that you have.

Milan fans are proud of beating Bayern coz we did the double on one of the BEST SIDES in Europe! It is a sense of achievement and satisfaction of beating Bayern home and away coz not many teams have ever done it!!! It is not easy to do it coz Bayern is one of the toughest sides in world football!! It is the same feeling like when you did the double over Real and Man U two years ago

We are better than Bayern or anybody else coz we are the European Champions and have earned that status. However on Matchday 1 everything changes again and every club is on the starting line including us and the 8 month marathon begins which will conclude next May.

Bayern is one of the best teams and cannot be taken lightly! You have heard it from a Milan fan who acknowledges this fact. I hope this changes your mind toward Milan fans who like me acknowledge Bayern as a worthy rival and respect its pedigree, records and strength!

---

P.S Payman you can delete this post and the one above it if you please as it has no relevance to this thread.

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post #97 of 1477 (permalink) Old August 15th, 2003, 17:10
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Sour grapes yet again.
Deservings aren't merit for holding up cups? maybe! maybe not all teams deserve (just see the latter Italian league, sigh!) what they got.

But cups are not given out on the basis of "if..." (or Milan would have 19 titles!)
So... maybe next year, bayern and real supporters?

Every energy, smile, blink, inbreath, heartbeat skip, gesture of longing in my life comes from you,Toro!

The stars are the eyes of all our beloved and departed fellow Granata, reflecting their love upon their kin... us.

Nereo Rocco, 1912-1978
FACCHETTI, PUSKAS, LIEDHOLM, MYTHS OF A LONG-LOST SOCCER
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post #98 of 1477 (permalink) Old September 11th, 2003, 22:42 Thread Starter
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After a long period of no update, I'll be posting in the next few days, a few great stories in here. Starting with this one, which relates the first Scudetto of the modern era for Milan, in the 1950-51 season. It comes from Forza Milan of May 2003 and is written by the legendary and unique Carlo Pellegatti. I'm translating it to English. Enjoy!

FORZA PELLEGATTI!!!
FORZA MAGICO MILAN!!!!

SCUDETTO...FINALLY!!!!


"In 1951, Milan becomes Champions of Italy after a waiting of 44 years. Inside the dressing rooms, the emotions go from drama due to the unexpected home defeat to Lazio, to the euphory after the contemporany defeat of Inter, the only team able to pass the ragazzi in the standings. The big hero of this season is Gunnar Nordhal, author of 34 goals.

By Carlo Pellegatti.

Fourty five years without winning a Scudetto. An eternity! It was not easy to become and remain a Milan fan between 1907 and 1951, a time when glory had other colors. But the love of the Rossoneri of those years, love passed onto the next generation by aunts, uncles, grand parents and co, a love and dedication that paid off with tremendous trophies and titles, conquered in the second part of the last century that just finished. Successes and triumphs that took Milan to the top of the world.

It is indeed in order to honour that extraordinary event of a Milan, again first in the league, that on June 10, 2001, Adriano Galliani (accompagnied by an historic Milanista as Fedele Confalonieri) has wanted to meet and reward, with a gold medal, the heroes of this victory, half a century later. The first Scudetto of the modern era, the fourth of Milan's history. Liedholm, Zagatti, Buffon, Silvestri, Burini, De Grandi, Santagostino, Vicariotto with Davide Eleni, the Romaccioni of those years, were invited to re-live this event. They were all smiling, sereine and happy; however, fifty years ago, the atmosphere inside the dressing room was quite the opposite.


Let us go back in time and re-live the emotions of that unforgettable Milan, of this historic sunday. The Great Milan of President Umberto Trabattoni starts building the foundations of this success in the 1948-49 season, with the purchases of the Irish Sloan and the Islandish Gudmundsson. The sporting director Toni Busini is close to purchase also the Danish Ploeger, that Juve takes under the nose of Milan, in what almost caused as a provocation. In order to be forgiven for that "diplomatic incident", the Juve president, Agnelli, lets Milan freely get the centre forward of the Swedish National Team, Gunnar Nordhal (already optioned by the Bianconeri), debutting with Milan against Pro Patria on the 17th of January 1949. During the following season, the swede was joined by two great footballers of his country: Gunnar Gren aka "Il Professore" (The Professor) and Nils Liedholm, "Il Barone" (The Baron). The results are immediate, with a brillant second post in the league while scoring 118 goals.

The prerogative of a spectacular, devastating and prolific Milan was born at the beginning of the 1950-51 season. The Rossonero attack starts their new Serie A campaign with results like these: 6-2 against Udinese, 2-1 in Genoa against Sampdoria, 9-2 against Novara, 5-3 to Napoli. The Milan march seems unstoppable, but is put to an halt in the Derby of November 12th, 1950 where the Nerazzuri, led by Lennart Skoglund (another Swede) won 3-2. Despite this loss, the Rossoneri are still on top of the standings and their run continues until the triumphant epilogue on June 10th, 1951.

Second last day of the season, Milan is leading the table with 3 points over Inter, who plays that day in Torino, against the Granata while Milan faces Lazio at a full packed San Siro. The Milan fans are expecting that title for such a long time this moment. It could be the first Scudetto for a lot of the fans in the stands that afternoon. At that time, there were not the now famous "Tutto il calcio minuto per minuto" or there were no cellphones and the news from Torino came very scarcely and not that rapidly. The news coming from Torino were not very encouraging while the news from Milanello were dramatic. The first half, at the San Siro ends 2-1 in favor of the Biancocelesti, a result that would not change until the end of the game.

Let us know relive the last minutes of that afternoon with the words of Gunnar Nordhal, taken from his book "Oro e campi verdi" :
" We had to beat Lazio. It was this very obligation to win at all cost, almost played us a deadly trick to our nervous system. We played badly. We were very motivated, against a difficult and solid Lazio formation. We left the field, beaten 2-1 and depressed. I will always rememer - continues the Swede in his memoires - the deep sorow of Carletto Annovazzi, that as a born and raised Milanese, he had put everything he got into this Scudetto dream. Inside the dressing rooms, no one moved, no one had the courage to talk when Busini, the sporting director, entered yelling:" Inter lost in Torino!". At that moment, the atmosphere changed drastically: from players and coaches, staying silent in their seats, almost crying, everyone, in one single burst, yelled their joy and started embracing and hugging each other in a frenesy. Players embracing, managers, coaches crying of joy. The tifosi, who had heard the news via the loudspeakers of the San Siro stadium at the same time as the players in the dressing rooms of the incredible result of Torino, started asking loudly for the players to come back on the field. We were now sure of becoming Champions of Italy: the tifosi jumped above the fences of the stadium and joined us all on the pitch and celebrated with us, bearing us on their shoulders, crazy of happiness and joy."

The stats give an even greater meaning to the triumph of this fantastic Milan. Gunnard Nordhal, in the 37 games he played, scored 34 goals. He is the prince of the Milan attack, that would score that season, in total, 107 goals with only 39 against. After the Swede, the 2nd goal scorer for Milan is Annovazzi with 17 goals, then Liedholm with 13 and Burini with 12; 26 wins, 8 ties and 4 losses, for a Milan, that a few weeks later, would go onto to win, the Coppa Latina (ancestor of the Champions Cup) the first international trophy of its history. The beginning of the great Rossonero era started in that far away 10th of June 1951. A splendid history that is still moving, exciting, enthralling, infinite. The History of this Magico, Marvelous, Old Milan!"

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #99 of 1477 (permalink) Old September 13th, 2003, 02:53 Thread Starter
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Another one from the Forza Milan of July 2003 by the legendary Carlo Pellegatti. Enjoy!

FORZA PELLEGATTI!!!


Accade in Luglio: Battere la Juve è di...rigore. (It happened in July: Beating Juve is "di rigore"). (Italian play of words).

In Rome as in Manchester, thirty years ago: Milan faces the Bianconeri in the finale of the Italian Cup that the ragazzi win after the penalty session following a very hard fought game, venging the bitterness of Verona. Hero of the match, Villiam Vecchi, today, Dida's maestro.

By Carlo Pellegatti.

The opponent: Juventus. Reward: a Cup. The victory: at the penalyt kicks. The hero: the Milan keeper. It seems that one is writing about the latest, amazing, moving match in Manchester, however, the game in question was thirty years ago, on July 01 1973, when Milan won its third Coppa Italia. 1973, An unforgettable year, the year of Salonicco, of Verona, of Rome. Not only for the intense sensations that this team offered to the rossoneri fans, but also because this Milan was one of the most spectacular, classic, devastating of human memory. Rocco, believed to be a defensive coach, fielded a very offensive minded team strenghtened by the defensive experts such as Schnellinger, Rosato and Anquilletti but with a forward line that most times had simultaneously together, Bigon, Benetti, Prati, Rivera and Chiarugi. Five stars as talented as the ones of today's team for their class, their style, their pride and their will to win. And this Milan won and convinced, playing in both Serie A and Cup Winners' Cup, games of extraordinary beauty. No one can forget the 4-1 away against Sampdoria, or the magnificient goal of an ever inspired and simply magic Gianni Rivera in Vicenza, beaten 3-0.

It was not only a beautiful Milan, but also a concrete, solid, compact, never giving up team that used these qualities to perfection during the Cup Winners' Cup final, won with difficulty in Salonicco (Greece). Down 1-0 after only 6 minutes of play after Chiarugi's goal, the match turned into an assault from the English players of Leeds, towards the goal of Milan, forcing the heroic Milan defence into a perfect performance, with the keeper, Vecchi, the absolute hero of the game. Three days later, on May 20th, 1973, a fatal and unforgettable date for the Milan fans.

I still have in front of my eyes, the highway between Milano and Venezia of this sunday morning, with a long, very long Rossonero flag with a golden star, long of 140 kilometres, held on top of hundreds of cars and buses. The joy and enthusiasm of the Rossoneri fans, unaware of the sad and dramatic afternoon that they were about to experience, a striking contrast with the sadness, sorrowness in their faces, bathed by their tears at the end of the match. Indeed, Juventus won, at the 90th minute, a season dominated by the Rossoneri, that in Verona, for some still unknown reasons, collapsed in what is still to date, one of the great mysteries of modern football.

Only a few years later, we realized that this match, this day, represented a turning point for the Milan fans. Tthat day, a kind of generational passage occured. A lot of the fans, perhaps due to the great delusion felt that day, stopped following the Ragazzi in all the away games, friends of numerous travels, of so many long and tiring campaigns, of so many card games in the buses that left at 1 am the previous night to go to Roma or Napoli. But let us get back to these days. Milan loses the title of the Star (10th Scudetto) on May 20th, 1973, however, one week later, we cannot miss the beginning of the Coppa Italia campaign in Bergamo.After this game, the anger increased in the team and in all of us fans, as we all knew that Verona represented just an accident. A unique accident, black and incredible. Indeed because in Bergamo, the Ragazzi retrieved their real level, the one, just as an exemple among many others, against Bologna that they beat in front of 90,000 fans at the San Siro in a superb performance. Against Atalanta, Bigon and Chiarugi, secured the result early on as they scored inside the first 15 minutes and the team played a solid match. The team coached by Rocco was in the group B in the Coppa Italia along side Cagliari, Napoli and Atalanta while group A included Inter, Juventus, Reggiana and Bologna. The teams in each group would play each other twice, home and away in a mini-league type with the first team in each group would qualify for the final.

The following sunday, the team had a natural "day off" following a series of intensive and stressful games caused the team to lose at home against Cagliari, a loss that would not however, jeopardize Milan's chances in the Italian Cup that in the following 4 games, won all of them, Napoli home and away, Atalanta at the San Siro and Cagliari away. A secure path leading to a well deserved final but with a great dissapointment: in a splendid form, Gianni Rivera was suspended from the final thanks to Francescon of Padova for a foul, perhaps his first of the whole season.

In the other group, it was Juve who qualified giving the chance to a revenge of the robbery of Verona. Bettega opened scored right away for Bianconeri, but in the 5th minute of second half, Benetti, tied the game with a penalty. In the second half, the men of Cesto Vycpalek (Juve's coach), lead by Capello and Halle had a physical problem (calo) but the Rossoneri didn't manage to take advantage of it. The result didn't change not even in the overtime and thus, off we went to the penalty kicks. The 80,000 fans of the Olimpico of Roma, just like the players, were taken by the intense emotions of the game and exhausted the heat. Shnellinger was the first to go to the penalty spot. "Wolkswagen", as he was nicknamed by Rocco, didn't miss his shot. 1-0 for Milan. Then, Causio's turn came. Villiam Vecchi dived on his left and saved the "Barone's" shot.

A scream of joy was transformed right away into a scream of dissapointment: Angonese, the ref of the match, decided to have the shot retaken and in his second tentative, Causio scored. Next, Benetti's turn, who with a shot on the right of Zoff put the Rossoneri back into the lead. From this moment on, the Villiam Vecchi show started: first he saved the shot from Anastasi, diving on his right and blocking the ball, then, returned the hard but central shot of Bettega, while in the time being, Chiarugi and Biasolo secured the decisive lead for Milan. Milan scored again with Magherini, after the Juve defender, Spinosi, having sent the ball outside of the net. The last penalty was taken by Cuccureddu: saved yet again by Vecchi, but the inflexible Angonese ordered the shot to be retaken and on the second try, the defender from Sardagna, scored a useless goal.

The hero of Salonicco Vecchi had emulated his exploits 45 days later, thanks to his grinta, his style, his class and his courage. Zoff, the great Zoff, this time around, had to bow in front of his colleague that had lead his teammates to a victory that the taste of the big revenge on the Juventini rivals. The Milan of that season was very strong, the strongest. Only destiny prevented it from conquering the Scudetto of the Star (10th Scudetto) with six years of anticipation, but this Coppa Italia made it clear to all, critics and fans, the great qualities of this Milan squad, lead by a fabulous Gianni Rivera with the collaboration of the solid and concrete Bigon, of the funambulist Chiarugi, of the hard working Benetti. However, in that night, the greatest of all of them, was Villiam Vecchi, that 30 years later, has relived the exact same sensations of this July 01st, 1973 through his pupil, Dida. Cool on his line and implacable like him, against the same black and white jerseys. An incredible story that has repeated itself. A Milan story."

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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post #100 of 1477 (permalink) Old September 16th, 2003, 03:24 Thread Starter
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A new one: It happened in August: The last perle of the Capitano. From the Forza Milan of August 2003. Enjoy!

The 1995-96 season opens with a win in Padova, to be remembered for at least two reasons: the first goal of George Weah with the Milan jersey and the last goal of Baresi, at the end of his famous "Coast to Coast". At the end of that season, it was Scudetto # 15.

By Carlo Pellegatti.

I remember with affection each Milan of the past 40 years. For exemple, the one lead, inspired, illuminated by Gianni Rivera, accompagnied me from the victories in black and white (the triumphs of the 60's) to the successes in colour in yellow, the yellow of the Star (10th Scudetto in 1979). Or the one, that displayed the first signs of extreme class, in the middle of the 80's, and then later, oozing all their class under the guidance of president Berlusconi and Arrigo Sacchi. I have admired the implacable and relentless record making machine, lead by Fabio Capello, the Great. It was a Milan, that in these early years of the 1990's, had won the Scudetto at the end of the winter, without any possibility or hope for the opponents.

Strong, very strong are the emotions that the team led by Zaccheroni gave us, with their magnificient run of 7 wins. Never, never will I forget this goal by Ganz that gave us the win against Sampdoria, or those final minutes of the Fiorentina-Lazio, or the unbelievable save from Abbiati on the shot from Bucchi on the unforgettable afternoon in Perugia.

Unrepeatable, unforgettable this penalty kick by Sheva in Manchester, with the Cup, held 40 years later, by another Maldini. From Cesare to Paolo, while thousands upon thousands of lights shining, the flashes of the cameras of Rossoneri tifosi, illuminating this magnificient sight.

However, one of the Milan that entertained me the most, one of the richest Milan in terns of players of class, was the Milan of the 15th Scudetto, of the 1995-96 season. Between the posts, Sebastiano Rossi, the keeper of the records. The defence was composed of the 4 Padri della Patria ( 4 Fathers of the Nation) - Baresi, Costacurta, Maldini and Tassotti - with the addition of a champion like Panucci. In midfield, Desailly, Albertini, Boban, Donadoni, Eranio, Lentini, Di Canio to inspire the fantasisti Savicevic and Roberto Baggio with Weah and Marco Simone up front. Each of these names give me the goosebumps. What a marvelous cocktail of champions!

I still remember the emotion of seeing Roberto Baggio walking in Milanello, or waiting, in front of the door that leads from the dressing rooms to the Club House, for Boban and Savicevic, the Absolute Genius. No one forgets the smile of George Weah when he was parking one of his 1000's cars, nor forgetting his joyous salute, each day, with a warm voice:"Ciao, Carlos!". What a great Milan, what amazing wins that year, unforgettable actions and plays produced by these players with feet of pure and limpid class.

Everything began on this first day of the season, on a hot and humid day. It was on the 27th of August of 1995 and the Ragazzi are to play in Padova. The stadium is fully packed with everyone anxiously awaiting to see in action the Dream Team built and wanted by Silvio Berlusconi, who was present on the first match of that team, a few weeks earlier, at Alessandria, that ended with a promising and convincing 3-0. Very early on, at the 6th minute, the first emotion. Roberto "Zucchero filato" Baggio sends a sweet ball in the middle and George Weah jumps and heads it into the top corner. It's the first prowess of a great forward, one of the best and strongest of the History of Milan. Some of his goals, some of his moves and actions, some of his inventions are inimitable and unique. We all remember his goals at the Olimpico, against Lazio and Roma or the one against Juve, on match day six, when Milan went top of the table, waving at the rest of the teams and running towards Scudetto # 15. But from him, other than the one that I have voted best goal of the century, - the goal against Verona after a 90 metres run, "coast to coast" -, I also want to remind his other magic and inexplainable slalom in its ballistic absurdity, when surrounded by at least 5 opponents like the best James Bond, went past them all and gave the ball to Blomqvist to beat the Bologna keeper. You want to see that goal again? I remind you the date: 16 February 1997.

But let us get back to this first day of the 95-96 season, where Padova equalises in the middle of the first half with Amoruso. One minute from the half time, Franco Baresi goes into one of his trademark Coast to Coast. When our Capitano goes on his runs forward, the whole team is taken by goosebumps and projected in attack by the push forward of its fuoriclasse and we are all always touched and moved by that, as if we were witnessing Gulliver in the Country of the Lillipuziani.

All the Milan fans realize right away that this is not the usual run forward with a precise pass to a teammate at the end of the action. Not this time. The path before him turns into a large boulevard. "L'immensità che é diventato regola" (the Immensity that became a rule, one of the many nicknames of Franco Baresi), increases his speed, passes the ball to Weah, whom with one of his trademark feint opens up the Padova defence wide and returns the ball to Baresi, now alone in front of the opposition's keeper Bonaiuti. Time stops and is suspended for a long moment. Everyone stops breathing, even my voice in front of my microphone is stopped. It's been since the 25th of March of 1990 that we have not been screaming of joy for a goal of our Grande Capitano, in Serie A. Five long years have passed and with a soft and swift touch, beats the keeper and scores the goal of the lead. Everyone runs towards him to hug and congratulate Him. Everyone is happy, moved. It is not a normal goal, it's a goal by Franco Baresi. He that spits his blood and soul for Milan and making sure that the ball doesn't go beyond the Milan goal line, has given the lead to Milan.

The Ragazzi then would went onto win the match, that would remain unforgettable as it marks the first win of a season, dominated, and because it also celebrates the first official goal of a legendary striker, but above all, because, Franco Baresi, in that hot August afternoon, scored his final goal of his unreachable carrier. An historic goal, because everything that is related to Baresi is historic!

"En su vida, un hombre puede cambiar de mujer, sus opiniones politicas o su religion pero no su equipo de futbol." Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayen poet.

FORZA MAGICO MILAN!
ALLEZ LES BLEUS!

Non Vincete MAI!!!

Comprate chi volete, ma il nostro spirito non l'avrete mai!
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